skip to main content
Subscribe

E-list # 168

Books by Women

click for a larger image of item #911241, Appalachian Portraits Jackson, University Press of Mississippi, (1993). A limited edition, issued as part of the Author and Artist Series, of this highly regarded book of photographs by Adams, with narrative by Smith. This is No. 2 of 50 numbered copies signed by Adams. An uncommon book in any hardcover issue, and especially scarce in this limited, numbered issue. Fine in a fine slipcase. [#911241] $2,000
click for a larger image of item #913719, Appalachian Portraits Jackson, University Press of Mississippi, (1993). The hardcover trade issue of this volume of photographs by Adams, with narrative by Smith. Issued as part of the Author and Artist Series. Fine in a near fine, spine and edge-sunned dust jacket. An impressive book, and uncommon in the hardcover issue. [#913719] $950
click for a larger image of item #25284, Coyote's Daylight Trip Albuquerque, La Confluencia, 1978. Her second book, a collection of poems published by a small New Mexico publisher. Warmly inscribed by the author to another writer. Near fine in wrappers. [#025284] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #13485, Two or Three Things I Know For Sure (NY), Dutton, (1995). The uncorrected proof copy of this narrative work based on a performance piece that Allison wrote and performed after the success of Bastard Out of Carolina, her first novel. Together with the photocopied typescript, which reproduces numerous changes and corrections, presumably authorial, including the excision of several long paragraphs, still visible. Edge tears to the cover sheet; otherwise fine. The proof copy is fine in wrappers. Allison's first novel was highly praised, and controversial. It was adapted for a television miniseries which won an Emmy award and was nominated for several others, but was for a time banned in Canada because of the controversial subject matter. [#013485] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #914705, Homecoming NY, Grove, (1984). The hardcover issue of her first book, a collection of poetry, published seven years before her award-winning first novel, How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents. Inscribed by the author in January of 1985, the year following publication. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with just slight wear to the spine extremities, and a touch of unnecessary black ink added to the crown. The hardcover issue of this book is very scarce, particularly in fine condition and signed. [#914705] $850
click for a larger image of item #914607, Seven Trees (North Andover), Kat Ran Press, 1998. Autobiographical poems by the Dominican-American author of How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents and In the Time of the Butterflies, among others. With lithographs by Sara Eichner. One of 50 numbered copies of a total edition of 65 signed by the author and the artist, hardbound in handmade flax paper by David Bourbeau of the Thistle Bindery. The second publication by this press, an elaborate production that sold for nearly $1000 at publication and has been out of print for years. Eichner has since become one of the more collectible artists working today. An attractive and uncommon volume. 11-1/2" x 16-1/4". Fine, in the original clamshell case, with a bit of dust soiling, with publisher's prospectus laid in. [#914607] $1,500
click for a larger image of item #28849, The Kentucky Trace NY, Knopf, 1974. The uncorrected proof copy of this novel of the American Revolution by the author of The Dollmaker, as well as several highly praised books of nonfiction on Kentucky and the Cumberland Valley. This novel is a fictional counterpart to her nonfiction history The Flowering of the Cumberland, published in 1963. Small date written at top spine; small crease mid-spine and mild spotting to rear cover; about near fine in tall wrappers. The critical and commercial success of The Dollmaker -- it was a runner-up for the National Book Award, which was won that year by William Faulkner -- made Arnow an iconic figure as female novelist, and her strong, and strong-willed, female characters caused her to be identified in later years as something of a proto-feminist writer. [#028849] $150
click for a larger image of item #31653, One Good Turn London, Doubleday, (2006). The second of her acclaimed mystery novels featuring Jackson Brodie, which have pushed the boundaries of the genre. Signed (initialed) by the author. With two dust jackets, both the normal trade edition dust jacket and a variant that lacks a price on the front flap: we would declare this the export edition jacket but for two other changes: the heading "Case Histories" on the rear panel is in a variant typeface, and the front flap copy runs three more lines (owing to line breaks, rather than variant text). Atkinson's first novel, Behind the Scenes at the Museum, won the 1995 Whitbread Book of the Year Award and her 2013 alternate-histories novel, Life After Life, also earned her significant acclaim far outside of the mystery genre, both in the U.K. and in the U.S., and itself won several awards. Fine, in two fine dust jackets. [#031653] $200
click for a larger image of item #26676, Thoughts of a Human (Provincetown), Self-published, (1983). A humorous collection of pamphlets laid into an illustrated folder, done by the noted Provincetown artist. Pamphlets include "Shedding a Self," "The Birth of the Child of Choice," "Diary of a Prime-Time Crier," "Dogs I Have Known," and "How to Criticize Art." Baker has published a humorous book on Provincetown's dogs, is known for her Cape Cod landscapes, and had an exhibition in 2000 of a follow-up to this collection called "More Thoughts of a Human." This heavily illustrated collection of pamphlets was apparently self-published, and this copy is inscribed by the author to artist Raphael Soyer. An uncommon, interesting and funny work by a noted artist, and a significant association copy. [#026676] $150
click for a larger image of item #31812, Through These Eyes; What Remains; Highstead Portfolio Salt Spring Island, Self-Published, ca. 2004 and 2005. Three catalogs of Bateman's photographs, each printed on a Mac; each fine in oblong wrappers. All from the library of Peter Matthiessen; Highstead Portfolio is inscribed by Bateman to Matthiessen, with an autograph note signed laid in. [#031812] $150
Worcester, Metacom Press, 1981. The hardcover issue. The first separate appearance of this short story, which first appeared in Antaeus. Of a total edition of 276 copies, this is one of 26 lettered copies, signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#911362] $300
click for a larger image of item #29439, Saint Englewood, Pineapple Press, (1985). Her first book. Signed by the author in Miami in 1992. Together with a three page original story by Bell, in the form of letter, about a gang of three circus dogs gone bad that hang out behind Vinnie Tellarino's Steak House & Restaurant, emerging only to steal purses and books that need to be signed. The book has foxing to the endpages and page edges; near fine in a near fine dust jacket foxed on verso. Blurbs by Anne Tyler, Gail Godwin and James Dickey. The letter/story is a dot matrix print out that is folded in thirds and is also signed by Bell. As best we can tell, the story has not been published. Bell wrote the novel that was the basis for the 1995 film, The Perez Family, with Marisa Tomei and Anjelica Huston. [#029439] $300
June 22, 1988. Two pages promising to send an article which will apparently deal with the parallels between American Indian and Japanese ways of living, the life of Maria Sanchez, and "life lived as an entity, all of a piece. The artist as not a soul divided..." Folded in thirds for mailing; holograph corrections. A nice letter, with good content. Signed by the author. Fine. With envelope. [#015471] $125
click for a larger image of item #33604, Fabian Essays in Socialism London, The Fabian Society, 1889. Inscribed by contributor Annie Besant to her son, (Arthur) Digby Besant (twice) in April, 1890. With Digby Besant's ownership signature and bookplate. The volume was edited by George Bernard Shaw. Besant's contribution is titled "Industry Under Socialism." Besant was a socialist, theosophist, women's rights activist, and an early supporter of, and speaker for, the Fabian Society. In 1890, the year she gave her son this book, she met Helena Blavatsky, founder of the Theosophical Society; after Blavatsky's death in 1891, Besant became one of the leaders and key figures in the theosophical movement, which eventually split into several factions, and also led to the Anthroposophy movement, when Rudolph Steiner, another leader in the Theosophical Society, broke away from it. Spine and covers darkened, with wear to the joints; a good copy, and a unique family association copy. Books signed by Besant, one of the most prominent female activists of the 19th and early 20th centuries, are uncommon. [#033604] $850
click for a larger image of item #31835, Markings. Aerial Views of Sacred Landscapes (NY), Aperture, (1986). Signed by the author. Additionally, with a typed letter signed by the author to Peter Matthiessen laid in, reminding him that she had hoped for an essay by him for this text but had been turned down due to time constraints and requesting he consider writing a short text for her next book, Planet Peru. Bridges has included an Artist's Statement and her CV, along with press releases, news clippings, and promotional cards. The extra materials are edge-sunned; the book is fine in a very near fine dust jacket. [#031835] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #912303, Street Games Garden City, Doubleday, 1974. Her first book of fiction, a collection of stories. Inscribed by Brown to the writer Andre Dubus and his then-wife: "For Tommie and Andre, For such whole-hearted listening and such generous approval -- THANKS seems a tiny word. Rosellen/ May 1976." A little rubbing to the cloth edges; near fine in a near fine dust jacket with wear at the spine extremities. A nice inscription and an excellent association. [#912303] $175
click for a larger image of item #5660, Street Games Garden City, Doubleday, 1974. The uncorrected proof copy of her first book of fiction, a collection of stories. Publisher's informational sheet present but detached from front cover, leaving glue residue there. Mild creasing to rear cover; still near fine in tall, white wrappers. Uncommon format. There was also a comb bound issue in red wrappers. [#005660] $150
click for a larger image of item #5664, Opening Nights NY, Atheneum, 1985. A novel by the author of the Pulitzer Prize nominee The Buzzards and the National Book Award nominee Raw Silk. Warmly and lengthily inscribed by Burroway to award-winning writer Jay Neugeboren, author of Imagining Robert, among others, and dated in the year of publication. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#005664] SOLD
(Climate Fiction)
click for a larger image of item #33612, Parable of the Sower NY, Four Walls Eight Windows, (1993). The advance reading copy of this 1993 novel set in 2024-2027 amid a landscape of global warming and social inequality. Fellow writer Paul Di Filippo's ownership label on half title. Di Filippo reviewed the book for Asimov's Science Fiction. Butler, as a black woman writing science fiction that included some of the most highly praised novels of their era, was instrumental in opening the genre to perspectives that had been largely excluded previously. Corner crease front cover; near fine in wrappers. Advance copies of this novel are extremely uncommon. [#033612] $250
Washington, D.C., U.S. Department of the Interior, 1943. A 74-page booklet written by Carson in her position as aquatic biologist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The first of four such Conservation Bulletins Carson wrote, each focusing on a different geographic region. Small owner name (Leo Shapovalov) stamped to front cover. Shapovalov was at one point the editor of California Fish and Game. Shallow midline crease to booklet and a few edge tears; very good in stapled wrappers. [#029060] $175
click for a larger image of item #29061, "How About Citizenship Papers for the Starlings?" in Nature Magazine (Washington, D.C.), (American Nature Association), 1939. A 3-page article in which Carson argues that starlings, introduced to the U.S. nearly 50 years prior, are more than earning their keep. Eugene Scheiffelin, head of the American Acclimatization Society, introduced two flocks into Central Park, one in 1890 and one in 1891; his motive (not mentioned by Carson) was a desire to import every bird ever mentioned in a work by Shakespeare (starlings had been mentioned once, in Henry IV.) This issue (June-July) is here bound together with the issues for the remainder of 1939, in a hand-lettered university library binding (with "discard" stamp inside the front cover and a circulation pocket at rear). The Carson issue is fine; the binding has a corner bump and is very good. A scarce Carson appearance. [#029061] $275
click for a larger image of item #11725, The Mixquiahuala Letters Binghampton, Bilingual Press, (1986). The first novel (after several poetry books) by the author of My Father was a Toltec. An epistolary novel for which the author proposes three different routes through the text, none of them in strict conformance with a straight reading. Inscribed by the author to the poet Ai in 1987, in part: "As someone once said to Walt Whitman in a dedication, 'from a less poet'." This is the simultaneous issue in wrappers; tiny foredge nick, else fine. A nice association copy of an uncommon book. Ai won the National Book Award for Vice. [#011725] $250
(London), Granta, (2009). The first British edition, and first hardcover edition, of this highly praised, award-winning first novel, originally published in a small edition in New Zealand. Signed by the author in 2013. Fine in a very near fine dust jacket nicked at the upper rear spine fold. [#031353] $200
click for a larger image of item #29873, The Ecotopian Sketchbook Berkeley, Banyan Tree Books, (1981). A coloring book/sketchbook based on Ernest Callenbach's 1975 influential utopian novel Ecotopia, in which Washington state, Oregon and northern California secede from the Union to create a society based on ecological principles. Callenbach's book both reflected, and served as a blueprint for, the back-to-the-land movement of the 1970s and the Green movement later, and also served as a critique of society that it repudiated. Inscribed by Clancy to another artist, "with much love shared about drawing and life," and dated in February, 1981. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#029873] $125
click for a larger image of item #32278, Poems for Herb Gold Self-Published, [ca. 1980s]. A collection of 12 poems, velobound, in gold-stamped plastic covers, by a writer who was closely involved with the San Francisco Bay Area literary scene for decades. Herbert Gold was one of the many writers who made his home in the Bay Area during that time, and this collection includes one poem titled after each of Gold's books of fiction up until 1980 (with one book un-poemed). Near fine. Unmarked, but from the library of Peter Matthiessen. Unusual, highly uncommon artifact of one of the great literary centers of postwar America. [#032278] $150
(n.p.), Midnight Paper Sales, (2002). Number 51 of 170 numbered copies signed by the author and by Gaylord Schanilec, the printer. Hardcover, issued without dust jacket. Fine. [#912399] $275
click for a larger image of item #32971, Samuel Johnson is Indignant (Brooklyn), McSweeney's, (2001). Two advance states of this collection of stories: unbound photocopied galleys, 201 sheets, 8-1/2" x 11", printed on rectos only, fine but for a near fine cover sheet; and velobound 8-1/2" x 11" sheets, now including the cover art by David Byrne, fine. [#032971] $500
click for a larger image of item #33446, Manuscript/Typescript, Skippack School (n.p.), (n.p.), ca. 1939. A hand-lettered and hand-illustrated draft title page and a hand-illustrated typescript first page of de Angeli's 1939 book Skippack School: Being the Story of Eli Shawder and of one Christopher Dock, Schoolmaster About the Year 1750. Signed by the author. De Angeli wrote and illustrated dozens of books, including her 1950 Newberry Award winner The Door in the Wall. Two of her books were also Caldecott honor winners, the award given to illlustrated children's books, in 1945 and 1955. This title was based on the life of Mennonite educator Christopher Dock, who taught in Skippack, Pennsylvania. From the collection of Mabel Zahn, longtime proprietor of Sessler's, the legendary rare book shop in Philadelphia. Letter of provenance available. The two pages are in a contemporary frame whose cloth mat exhibits foxing; the backing of the frame is brittle and chipped; the manuscript pages appear to be fine. [#033446] $1,250
click for a larger image of item #19676, Publisher's Archive for Dale Loves Sophie to Death NY, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, (1981). A unique set of publisher's materials for her well-received first novel, winner of the short-lived National Book Award for best first novel. Printer's blues; two sets of long galley sheets; three copies of the dust jacket (folded flat); mock-up of binding. One jacket creased; else all items fine. Presumably this would have been the only such set generated, for the publisher's own internal use. [#019676] $200
click for a larger image of item #33670, Mornings Like This (NY), HarperCollins, (1995). Inscribed by the author to Robert Stone and his wife: "For Janice and Bob/ from Annie." Also signed in full, "Annie Dillard." Light edge bumps; near fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#033670] $300
click for a larger image of item #32762, Original Painting of Primo Levi Dillard, author of Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, Holy the Firm, and For the Time Being, among many others, has painted a portrait of Primo Levi, author of Survival in Auschwitz and The Periodic Table. Dillard has reportedly stopped writing, dedicated her time to painting instead. Signed "Annie Dillard" in the lower left corner. No date, 6" x 8-1/2". Fine. [#032762] $2,500
click for a larger image of item #24844, A Brief History of My Addiction (London), Warren Editions, 1974. The first separate appearance of a piece that appeared in the Sunday Times in 1973, in which Drabble shares her delight in raising children. One of 150 copies privately distributed for the publishers "to celebrate the birth of Daisy Victoria Gili." 4-1/2" x 5-1/4". Fine in self-wrappers. Scarce. [#024844] $350
click for a larger image of item #32642, Washington Journals. The Events of 1973-1974 NY, Random House, (1975). The personal journals of one of the leading Washington political writers, kept during the months that the Watergate scandal was unfolding, leading up to the resignation of President Nixon. As a Watergate history it was eventually overshadowed by Woodward and Bernstein's All the President's Men, but this book retains the immediacy of those days and those developments, recorded in real time. Inscribed by the author to a well-known New York philanthropist: "For ___ ___, With warm personal best wishes - Elizabeth Drew." Near fine in a very good dust jacket with a couple of small edge chips. An uncommon book signed. [#032642] $175
NY, Harper & Row, (1970). The first book by the author of the much-acclaimed Geek Love. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#912482] $250
click for a larger image of item #914648, Mystery Girls' Circus and College of Conundrum Ames Lake/Portland/Washington, D.C., M. Kimberly Press, 1991. An artist's book by the author of Geek Love, among others. One of 125 copies printed for the National Museum of Women in the Arts as the 1991 Library Fellows Artists' Book, the second volume in that prestigious series. Of each title produced, the artist received 25 copies and the Library Fellows each received a copy, leaving only a very small number available for sale. Signed by Dunn and by Mare Blocker, a highly praised book artist and Dunn's collaborator on this project. Elaborately printed and bound, with numerous woodcuts, color illustrations, fold outs, etc. Fine. [#914648] $1,500
click for a larger image of item #26009, Geode/Rock Body Santa Barbara, Capricorn Press, 1970. The first book by the author of The Solace of Open Spaces and Heart Mountain, among others, a collection of poems. This is one of 550 copies of the issue in wrappers, of a total edition of 600 copies. Inscribed by the author in 1992. Mild edge-sunning; else fine. [#026009] $300
click for a larger image of item #33718, Twilight of the Superheroes NY, Farrar Straus Giroux, (2006). Inscribed by the author to Robert Stone, "with decades of intense admiration," in the year of publication. Fine in a very near fine dust jacket with a small patch of dampstaining on the verso. Laid in is the 2006 program for the Brattleboro Literary Festival, with both Stone and Eisenberg listed. [#033718] $150
London, Rainbow Press, 1971. One of 300 numbered copies, signed by the three authors. Additionally, inscribed by both Fainlight and Sillitoe as a birthday gift to a friend in 2000. Leatherbound; fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#028421] $300
click for a larger image of item #33450, Soaked in Light Toronto, Quantum Theology, (2000). The first book by this Canadian horror fiction writer, a collection of four stories, signed by the author in 2001. One of the stories, "The Emperor's Old Bones," won the International Horror Guild Award for Best Short Story of 1999. Files was also a contributor to the Canadian television series The Hunger, an erotic horror anthology produced by Tony and Ridley Scott, and hosted in its two seasons by Terence Stamp and David Bowie. Files provided four of the stories for the 44-episode series, which was compared favorably to The Twilight Zone when it aired in 1997-2000. Fine in stapled wrappers. Includes a bibliography of her published short fiction up to that point. Uncommon; no copies listed in OCLC. [#033450] $200
click for a larger image of item #33451, The Narrow World Toronto, Quantum Theology, (2001). Her second book,signed by the author in the year of publication. Laid in are two autograph notes signed by Files. A collection of five short stories, including a reprint of her award-winning story, "The Emperor's Old Bones," which was included in her first collection, Soaked in Light. This volume has an introduction by Michael Rowe, the Canadian writer, and an updated bibliography of Files's short stories. Fine in wrappers. Only one copy listed in OCLC. [#033451] $200
click for a larger image of item #28219, The Country Between Us (Port Townsend), Copper Canyon, (1981). The limited edition, and the true first edition, of her second collection of poetry, the 1981 Lamont Poetry selection of the Academy of American Poets. Her first collection was published in the prestigious Yale Younger Poets series. This collection became the paradigm of "engaged" and activist poetry in the late '70s and early '80s. One of 200 copies signed by the author. Preceding the trade edition by several months. Fine. [#028219] $350
(Port Townsend), Graywolf Press, 1976. The poet's second book, this being the issue in wrappers, one of 1350 copies of a total edition of 1500. Inscribed by the author to another poet in 1981,with reference to "our days in Seattle," and signed with "Love." With the recipient's ownership signature. Fine in wrappers. A nice literary association. [#022701] $125
click for a larger image of item #33674, Moon Crossing Bridge (St. Paul), Graywolf, (1992). A collection of poetry, much of it reflecting on the death of her husband, Raymond Carver. Inscribed by Gallagher to Robert Stone: "For Bob -- many rivers & bridges, that one man we knew & loved -- Ray -- Love, Tess." Dated in Port Angeles, 6/2/92." Fine in a near fine, spine-sunned dust jacket with a closed gutter tear. [#033674] $150
click for a larger image of item #33673, Willingly (Port Townsend), Graywolf Press, 1984. The softcover issue. Inscribed by Gallagher to Robert Stone: a long inscription, referencing time spent together and commenting on three of the poems in this collection, concluding, "with affection and admiration," and dated July 23, 1985. Near fine in wrappers. [#033673] $150
click for a larger image of item #24524, What Is To Be Done? (Ontario), Quadrant Editions, 1983. Gallant's first play, written for television. Signed by the author. Gallant is most well-known for her short stories, and her collection Home Truths won the 1982 Governor General's Award, Canada's highest literary honor. A fine copy of the issue in wrappers. [#024524] $125
NY, Pantheon, (2010). Inscribed by the author to Peter [Matthiessen], with admiration and with an apology for stealing his time, adding "What a pleasure to spend the day with you." Fine in a fine dust jacket. Glass won the National Book Award for Three Junes. [#031913] $125
click for a larger image of item #28433, A World of Strangers London, Gollancz, 1958. Her fourth book, second novel. The British edition is the true first edition. Signed by the author. Owner name front flyleaf, else fine in a very good dust jacket with small chips at the corners and crown and a 1-1/2" tear at the upper front spine fold. Overall, an attractive copy. [#028433] $250
London, Cape, (1979). A novel of South Africa, which was originally banned there when it was first published. Inscribed by the author. Fading to top stain, one lower corner tapped; near fine in a near fine, lightly rubbed, spine-faded dust jacket. [#028436] $175
click for a larger image of item #26742, The Black Interpreters (Johannesburg), Ravan Press, (1973). Second issue, with passages by Mandlenkosi Langa censored on pages 54 and 60. Subtitled "Notes on African Writing," with one section on fiction and one on poetry. This copy is signed by the Nobel Prize-winning author. The poet was supposedly issued with a banning order in October, 1973 and the passages quoting him had to be deleted or the issues pulped: later reports say it was actually Langa's brother Benjamin who had been banned. Handling apparent to rear cover; about near fine in wrappers. A fairly uncommon book in either issue, and quite scarce signed. [#026742] $350
click for a larger image of item #21512, The Soft Voice of the Serpent NY, Simon & Schuster, (1952). The first American edition of the South African Nobel Prize winner's first book to be published outside of her native country. A collection of stories. Signed by the author. Small, neat owner name on flyleaf, faint edge-sunning; near fine in a near fine, spine-tanned dust jacket with some internal tape strengthening. An attractive copy of an important first book, and uncommon signed. [#021512] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #29313, Shamp of the City-Solo Providence, Treacle Press, 1974. The first book by the National Book Award-winning author of Lord of Misrule. One of 950 copies in wrappers of 1000 total. Inscribed by Gordon. With an autograph note signed by the author laid in; Gordon has written her note on the bottom of a letter from the publisher presenting this copy and announcing it as the first publication of Treacle Press. The book is near fine in wrappers; the note is also near fine. [#029313] $175
click for a larger image of item #22922, Chosen by the Lion (Saint Paul), Graywolf Press, (1994). The hardcover issue of her fourth collection. Warmly inscribed by the author "with gratitude and happiness." Fine in a fine dust jacket with a corner crease on the front flap. [#022922] $125
(Sydney), Picador, (1999). Winner of the Orange Prize. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#916233] $175
click for a larger image of item #5802, The Simple Truth NY, Harcourt Brace, (1955). The second novel by this writer who was a longtime contributor to The Partisan Review and The New York Review of Books and was married to the poet Robert Lowell for more than two decades. Inscribed by the author to a well known book collector "who finds everything." Watermark at spine base, visible only on verso of dust jacket; still near fine in a very good, price-clipped dust jacket. [#005802] $150
click for a larger image of item #25520, She Had Some Horses NY/Chicago, Thunder's Mouth Press, (1983). The very uncommon hardcover issue of the third book by this Creek author. Signed by the author on the title page, with a typed postcard signed to Clark Kimball of the Rydal Press laid in. Fine in a near fine, price-clipped dust jacket. Although the softcover issue of this title has had many printings, the hardcover had only one very small printing, in 1983. [#025520] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #33018, Letters to Mary: the Story of Helen Hayes NY, Random House, (1940). A book about Helen Hayes's life and work, authored by her mother, and written in the form of letters to her grand-daughter, Hayes' daughter Mary, when Mary was nine years old: it ends by passing the torch to Mary to be standing in the wings for all of Hayes' future exits. Sadly, both Helen and Catherine outlived Mary, who died from polio at 19. This copy is inscribed by Helen Hayes. Small bookplate under the front flap; foxing to the endpages; a very good copy in a very good, price-clipped dust jacket. [#033018] $125
San Francisco, City Lights, (1987). Velo-bound page proofs of these stories by women from all over the world about their experiences with war, some in Vietnam, others reaching back prior to World War I or forward to Central America in the 1980s. A powerful collection, published by City Lights and reprinted in 2003 by a university press. Plain cardstock covers. Plastic binding separating at ends. Near fine. Presumably only a very small number would have been printed in this format. [#030869] $200
click for a larger image of item #18924, Intrusions NY, Viking, (1981). The first book by the award-winning author of Stones From the River, among others. Warmly inscribed by Hegi in 1982: "For ____ - whose character Duane keeps haunting me - Ursula." Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#018924] $125
click for a larger image of item #32480, The Autumn Garden Boston, Little Brown, 1952. Later printing of this play by Hellman. Inscribed by the author to Peter [Matthiessen]: "For Peter, on his birthday, with affection, respect & other nice things/ Lillian/ 1963." Near fine in a good dust jacket. [#032480] $300
click for a larger image of item #32288, Ruby (n.p.), (n.p.), (n.d.). Bound typescript of what seems to be an unpublished novel, by a writer who specializes in murder mysteries set among the wealthy and whose mother, the actress Joan Alexander, was reportedly swindled out of $60 million by her financial adviser. Hitchcock's first novel was nominated for an Edgar Award. Her books chronicle the lives of the New York social elite, typically set in the Upper East Side and in the Hamptons on Long Island. Double-spaced, single-sided, 223 pages. Labeled "First Draft." Comb-bound in plain navy plastic covers. In an envelope address to Peter Matthiessen (but the return address is not Hitchcock's). Several penciled notations in the text in what appears to be Matthiessen's hand, confined to the first handful of pages; fine. [#032288] $150
NY, Farrar Straus Giroux, (1977). Her first book, a novel of teenage gangs. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#915112] $175
(Acomita), Acoma Press, 1985. A collection of stories by Hogan derived from a tale her father and grandfather used to tell. Her father's version (by Charles Colbert Henderson) is the first one in the collection; the rest of the writing is by Hogan. Signed by Hogan. Fine in wrappers. An attractive, uncommon volume published by a small press in Acoma Pueblo. [#916294] $250
(Acomita), Acoma Press, 1985. A collection of stories by Hogan derived from a tale her father and grandfather used to tell. Her father's version (by Charles Colbert Henderson) is the first one in the collection; the rest of the writing is by Hogan. This copy measures 9-1/2" x 5-3/4". If this is a true issue point, with a narrower outer margin than some copies we have seen, no priority has been determined. Fine in wrappers. [#029338] $125
click for a larger image of item #32482, Illusion of Memory East Hampton, Chopin Press, 2013. Inscribed by the author to Peter [Matthiessen]. Holden accompanied Matthiessen on one of his Auschwitz retreats, about which Matthiessen wrote in his last book, In Paradise. This is Holden's first novel, about the children of Holocaust survivors, and was self-published. Fine in wrappers. [#032482] SOLD
NY, Harcourt Brace World, (1965). Her first novel. Inscribed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#915192] $250
click for a larger image of item #8584, Half-Lives NY, Holt Rinehart Winston, (1973). The uncorrected proof copy of her second collection of poetry. Jong's breakthrough novel, Fear of Flying, published the same year as this collection, redefined the parameters for acceptable commercial fiction in the wake of the newfound freedoms of the Sixties and the women's movement, so much so that its title became a byword, and a part of the vernacular of contemporary political discussion. Inscribed by the author. Fine in tall wrappers with review slip laid in. [#008584] $175
click for a larger image of item #15617, Loveroot [NY], [Holt Rinehart Winston], 1975. A personalized advance copy of her third collection of poetry. Photocopied pages shot from an uncorrected proof copy, warmly inscribed by the author, and with one poem, "Advice to Myself After Losing My Wallet," crossed out, apparently by Jong. Together with an autograph note signed, on personal stationery, transmitting the sheets and thanking the recipient for some Nabokov books. All items fine in a torn, hand-addressed, postage due envelope. An interesting item from the author of the landmark novel Fear of Flying. [#015617] $250
click for a larger image of item #32298, Abacus Middletown, Wesleyan University Press, (1987). The first book, a collection of poetry in the Wesleyan New Poets series, by the author of the acclaimed memoirs, The Liars' Club and its sequels, and the recently published nonfiction, The Art of Memoir. This collection precedes her first memoir by eight years. This is the hardcover issue. Inscribed by the author to another writer in 1988: "For ___ -- with apologies for insults, memories of a lovely meal, & hopes for more." Fine in a very near fine dust jacket with faint edge creasing to the rear panel. Uncommon in hardcover, especially signed and as an association copy. [#032298] $500
click for a larger image of item #21174, Typed Letter Signed 1902. September 22 [1902]. Written to Mr. [William V.] Alexander, editor of Ladies Home Journal, who had requested a series of articles from Keller that were later published as The Story of My Life. Keller humbly thanks Alexander for payment for the last article; in part: "I only wish I could have made the story of my life more worthy of the generous praise it has received...It has meant a great deal in my life, and in Miss Sullivan's too -- the thought of the happiness that she says my compliance with your request has brought her is sweeter even than the thought of the kindness shown me in the letters that come constantly from old friends long silent and new friends whose words go to the heart..." Two 5" x 8" pages, typed with blue ribbon and signed "Helen Keller." A very early letter by Keller, preceding her first book, with exceptionally good content. Fine. [#021174] $3,500
(Immigration)
click for a larger image of item #33634, Immigration and the Future NY, George H. Doran, (1920). A book on immigration, economics, and race relations by a woman who was known for her work on immigration, women's rights, and prison reform. By the time this book was published, Kellor, who had her law degree, had been secretary and treasurer of the New York State Immigration Commission; chief investigator for the Bureau of Industries and Immigration of New York State; managing director of the North American Civic League for Immigrants; and director of the National Americanization Committee. This copy is inscribed by Kellor to Joseph Mayper, "with appreciation and gratitude for many years [?] of cooperation with work for the unforsaken [?] and for the pleasure of a happy association together." Mayper was the editor for Kellor's Immigrants in America Review. Spine-dulled, slight wear to corners, would be near fine but for the clean separation of the text block from the boards, thus only a fair copy, but an excellent association copy and a scarce signature. [#033634] $275
(Springfield), Gauntlet, (2000). Of 500 copies, this is a Publisher's Copy ("PC"). Signed by the author and by Richard A. Kirk, Douglas E. Winter, and Peter Straub. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#030649] $150
click for a larger image of item #29118, Annie John NY, Farrar Straus Giroux, (1985). Her second book, first novel, which expands on themes she touched on in her collection of stories, notably the plight of young, strong-willed girls born into a life of poverty. Inscribed by the author to Nicholas Delbanco and his wife, "with much love." Kincaid's pen ran out in the middle of the inscription: two colors are used. Fine in a very near fine, slightly spine-sunned dust jacket. A nice association copy: Delbanco was responsible for Kincaid's moving to Bennington to teach at Bennington College; and Kincaid and her then-husband, Allen Shawn (the dedicatee of this book), lived in Delbanco's house when they first settled in Vermont. [#029118] $150
click for a larger image of item #14851, Mermaids in the Basement Port Townsend, Copper Canyon, 1984. The uncommon uncorrected proof copy of these "poems for women." Stapled sheets with a black tape spine. A low-tech production, suggesting very few were done. Kizer won the Pulitzer Prize the following year, for her collection Yin. Fine, with publisher's promotional sheet laid in. [#014851] $125
click for a larger image of item #33636, The Looking-Glass Bronxville, Sarah Lawrence College, 1943. Two poems by Kizer, "So Speak" and ""I Dreamed I Was Saint Augustine," in this publication by the English Department of Sarah Lawrence College, designated as being "For Classroom Use." Kizer would have been a 17 year-old sophomore at the time: three months later she would have a poem ("When You Are Distant") published in The New Yorker. Her first book was not published until 16 years later. Modest spotting and sunning; very good in stapled wrappers. Uncommon. [#033636] $450
click for a larger image of item #6460, The Ungrateful Garden Bloomington, Indiana U. Press, (1961). The first regularly published book, a collection of poems, by a writer whose work is strongly associated with the Pacific Northwest and who later won the Pulitzer Prize. This is cloth issue, and is inscribed by the author to Oscar (Williams) "with love" in 1963. Williams is best-known as an anthologist but began by writing poetry: he won the Yale Younger Poets Award in 1921. A nice association copy of an important first collection. In addition to the inscription on the front flyleaf, Kizer has also added her contact information on the rear flyleaf. Fine in a near fine, spine-faded, price-clipped dust jacket. [#006460] $150
(Solar Eclipse)
click for a larger image of item #32928, Gold and the Sun. An Account of Experiments Conducted in Connection with the Total Eclipse of the Sun of 20th May, 1947 Edge, Stroud [UK], Kolisko Archive, 1947. Beginning in the early 1920s, and reportedly working on a suggestion by Rudolf Steiner, Lili Kolisko devised a technique she called "Capillary Dynamolysis" to assess food quality, from an anthroposophical perspective. She later applied her technique to investigate the effects of astronomical bodies on planetary metals: first during a total solar eclipse in Asia Minor in 1936 (building on work done in Germany in 1927), and here, during a total solar eclipse that was "visible" in the Southern Hemisphere, but which was detected by Kolisko's Capillary Dynamolysis in England. 24 page booklet of textual description, in stapled wrappers; with 22 loose pages/plates of photographic reproductions of her experiments with 1% solutions of gold chloride, and with 1% solutions of gold chloride in combination with 1% solutions of silver nitrate, copper sulphate, iron sulphate, tin chloride, or lead nitrate. Seminal scientific work, aiming to provide the basis for scientific understanding of metaphysics and spirituality and, in particular, the notion of correspondences between heavenly bodies and earthly effects. The text and the photographs are near fine, laid into a very good publisher's cardstock chemise. [#032928] $450
NY, Viking, (1980). Her first book, a novel. Signed by the author. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with one short edge tear. [#913604] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #33638, "Christmas to Me" in McCall's (Dayton), McCall's, 1961. Lee, writing the year she won the Pulitzer Prize for To Kill a Mockingbird, tells the story of the act of love from two friends [Michael and Joy Brown] that had given her the freedom to quit her job working for an airline in New York City and to write for one year -- or, as she puts it, "a full, fair chance at a new life." Wear to the spine and edges of the covers; very good. Other than her famous first novel, Harper Lee's appearances in print over the years have been few and far between. [#033638] $125
click for a larger image of item #23675, The Corolla, 1947 and 1948 Tuscaloosa, University of Alabama, 1947-1948. Two volumes of the yearbook of the University of Alabama, where Harper Lee studied law between 1945 and 1949. The 1947 Corolla shows Lee as editor of the humor magazine Rammer Jammer; sitting on the Board of Publications; voted one of the "campus personalities"; pictured as a student of law; and as a member of Chi Omega and of Triangle, an honor society of seniors who guide freshmen. In all, at least a half dozen pictures of Lee. Wear to the edges, rubbing to the joints; near fine. The 1948 Corolla pictures Lee only as a campus personality: before completing her degree requirements, Lee left law school for New York City, where she worked as an airline reservations clerk (and wrote To Kill A Mockingbird). From Lee's campus newspaper, as quoted in the book Harper Lee by Kerry Madden: "[Lee] is a traditional and impressive figure as she strides down the corridor of New Hall at all hours attired in men's green striped pajamas. Quite frequently she passes out candy to unsuspecting freshman; when she emerges from their rooms they have subscribed to the Rammer Jammer." Check marks in text; board edges worn; very good. [#023675] $1,000
click for a larger image of item #27232, In Search of Light NY, Exposition Press, (1969). A volume of vanity press poetry by Kelly, distinguished by a front cover blurb by Harper Lee, from a period of time when it was not uncommon for vanity publishers to simply warehouse their print runs for a predetermined length of time and then destroy them, with the majority of copies receiving distribution coming out of the author's allotment. For most vanity press works -- regardless of how many were originally printed -- the number of copies that ever made it into the marketplace probably averages in the low dozens. That fact, combined with the fact that Harper Lee has published so little other than To Kill a Mockingbird, makes this a rare occurrence in print by the author of one of the best-loved American novels of all time. This copy is inscribed by Kelly to Phoebe Lee "with fond best wishes." Kelly was a native of Excel, Alabama, less than 10 miles from Lee's hometown of Monroeville, Alabama. Small spot to front cover; near fine in a mildly rubbed dust jacket with a tear at the upper spine fold. [#027232] $375
click for a larger image of item #23539, Overland to the Islands Highlands, Jonathan Williams, 1958. The "Author's Edition" of this early collection of poetry, her fourth book, printed as Jargon 19. One of 50 copies, of a total edition of 500. While this edition is called for to be signed by Levertov on the front flap of the dust jacket, this copy lacks its jacket and is instead inscribed by Levertov with "love" on the first blank. Fine in plain white wrappers. [#023539] $400
(London), Review, (2004). The hardcover issue. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#913250] $175
click for a larger image of item #31471, Bobbie Lee. Indian Rebel (Toronto), Women's Press, (1990). First thus, with a new preface by the author. Signed by Maracle. The autobiography of a Canadian Native woman, recounting personal history and political radicalization. First published in 1975 by the Liberation Support Movement Press. This edition has a foreword by Jeannette Armstrong, Canadian Native writer and activist, and the grand-niece of Mourning Dove (aka Christine Quiinstasket), author of Co-Ge-We-A, The Half-Blood, and one of the earliest Native American women writers to be published. Scarce signed, in any edition. Near fine in wrappers. [#031471] $125
click for a larger image of item #915362, Fugitive Pieces (Toronto), McClelland & Stewart, (1996). An advance copy, in the form of comb-bound galleys, typeset but reproducing several holograph corrections. Her third book, first novel, which was first published in Canada, and only in wrappers. Winner of the Orange Prize for Fiction, the Guardian Prize for Fiction, the Books in Canada First Novel Award and the Trillium Prize. Signed by the author. 9" x 11". Fine. [#915362] $650
(Toronto), McClelland & Stewart, (1996). Her third book, first novel, this being the true first edition, only issued in wrappers in Canada. Winner of the Trillium Book Award, the Chapters/Books in Canada First Novel Award, the Orange Prize for Fiction, the City of Toronto Book Award, the Guardian Fiction Award, the Lannan Literary Award for Fiction, the Jewish Quarterly Prize for Fiction, and a number of other awards. Signed by the author, in Boston in 1997, "with best wishes." Fine in wrappers, with a Trillium Book Awards bookmark laid in. [#915361] $175
Toronto, Coach House Press, (1985). The first book, a poetry collection, by the author of the highly acclaimed novel Fugitive Pieces. Fine in wrappers. [#915358] $175
click for a larger image of item #33644, Conversation at Midnight NY, Harper & Brothers, (1937). A limited edition of this narrative poem by Millay, in the form of a play, reconstructed by the author after the original manuscript burned in a hotel fire. This is Copy No. 303 of an edition of 615, and it is signed by the author. Trace foxing to the board edges and spine cloth; a very good copy in a very good, edge-sunned slipcase with a 2" crack along an upper joint. [#033644] $350
NY, Dutton, (1986). The uncorrected proof copy of her first book, a well-received novel that was quickly reprinted. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#913333] $175
click for a larger image of item #6530, Vanishing Animals & Other Stories Boston, Godine, (1979). The uncorrected proof copy of her first book, a collection of stories that won an award from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters. Spine and lower rear panel abraded from label removal; still about near fine in wrappers. Signed by the author. [#006530] $125
Franklin Center, Franklin Library, 1992. The Franklin Library edition of this novel, which immediately preceded her being awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1993. This is the true first edition of this title. Signed by Morrison, with a special introduction by her for this edition. Leatherbound, all edges gilt, and with a silk ribbon marker bound in. Fine. [#912661] SOLD
NY, Knopf, 1977. Her third book and the first to go into multiple printings immediately after publication. Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award and chosen at the time of publication as a Main Selection of the Book of the Month Club, which probably gained the book exposure to more than 100,000 readers who would not have otherwise encountered it. A fine copy in a near fine, spine-sunned dust jacket. [#912668] SOLD
NY, Knopf, 1981. The first trade edition of her fourth novel. Signed by the author. Fine in a near fine, mildly sunned dust jacket. [#912669] $175
NY, Viking, (1982). Her first book, a novel constructed in seven stories. Winner of the American Book Award for best first novel of the year, and later the basis for a television miniseries. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#914229] $500
NY, Knopf, 2014. The advance reading copy of Offill's second novel, a "sparse," "experimental" portrait of a marriage that made the New York Times' list of top ten books of 2014. Fine in wrappers. Uncommon in the advance issue. [#031474] $125
click for a larger image of item #33649, The Kewpies and the Runaway Baby Garden City, Doubleday Doran, 1928. Inscribed by the author at Christmas in the year of publication: "To Somebody the Kewpies love/ from all the band, including Dr. Goldwater and Rose O'Neill." Creator of the Kewpie comic strip, and the inventor of the Kewpie doll, O'Neill was also the first published female cartoonist in the U.S. and active in the women's suffrage movement. Small (original) price stamp rear flyleaf, slight play in text block, and light crown wear; a very good copy in a good, edge-chipped dust jacket with some tearing at mid-spine. With a letter of provenance from a descendant of Dr. Goldwater. Uncommon signed and in dust jacket. [#033649] $1,500
click for a larger image of item #31477, Trust (NY), New American Library, (1966). The uncorrected proof copy of her first book, one of a handful of literary first novels published by NAL during the mid-60s, including John Gardner's The Resurrection and William Gass's Omensetter's Luck. Tall, comb-bound galley sheets. Laid in is a letter sent by editor David Segal to author John Barth, sending him "yet another first novel" and requesting "the pleasure of reading your opinion," as it appears Barth had made it clear that he would not be offering "a quotable quote." A noteworthy letter: Segal took over the newly founded hardcover publishing branch of New American Library, which previously had specialized in paperback publishing only -- notably the Signet and Mentor imprints, which reprinted classics and bestsellers. Segal immediately began publishing literary fiction by young, unknown writers, and in the course of a couple of years introduced William Gass, John Gardner, Michael Shaara, Alice Adams and Cynthia Ozick to the world, all of whom went on to become major American authors. It's a bit surprising that Barth would have been averse to providing a "quotable quote" for the likes of these, but apparently that was the case. This copy is signed by Barth on the first page and with his address stamp on the front cover. Ozick's name was left off the cover and has been added in ink. Mild sunning and curling to the covers; small tear at upper spine; about near fine. A very scarce proof of an important first book, and a copy with exceptionally interesting provenance. [#031477] $1,500
click for a larger image of item #29703, Enormous Changes at the Last Minute NY, Farrar Straus Giroux, (1974). The second collection of stories by one of the most highly acclaimed contemporary masters of the short story. Nominated for the National Book Award. Inscribed by the author to Shirley Solotaroff: "Shirley my old pal/ love/ Grace." Fine in a fine dust jacket with a bit of rubbing to the black front panel. [#029703] $200
click for a larger image of item #29162, The Little Disturbances of Man Garden City, Doubleday, 1959. A wonderful association copy of her first book, a collection of stories, by a writer who helped define the role of women and politics in contemporary literature: engaged without being didactic, Paley focused on both the ordinariness and the wonder of everyday life. Inscribed by Paley to Jean Stafford and her third husband, the journalist A.J. Liebling: "To Jean & Joe -- Grace Paley." Like Paley, Stafford's greatest medium was the short story: her Collected Stories won the Pulitzer Prize in 1970. Paley's Collected Stories, which included stories from this title, was a finalist for both the Pulitzer and the National Book Award, 25 years later. Offsetting to the endpages; near fine in a very good dust jacket with spotting to the rear panel and rubbing to the folds. [#029162] $750
click for a larger image of item #27452, Los Ambulantes North Brookfield, Thistle Hill Press, (1982). A study of and tribute to the itinerant photographers of Guatemala. With photographs by Parker and text by Neal. Printed in a deluxe edition of 100 copies, this copy is out of series and from the library of the authors. With an original selenium-toned silver print signed by Neal. The print is housed in a folding chemise; the book is bound in Guatemalan "ghost" fabric, purchased by the authors on their trip; both are enclosed in a clamshell box with paper labels. A trade edition was issued by the MIT Press, but the limited edition is extremely scarce. Fine. [#027452] $750
click for a larger image of item #4289, Black Tickets (NY), Delacorte Press/Seymour Lawrence, (1979). The uncorrected proof copy of her well-received first collection of stories, her first book to be published by a major, mainstream publisher. Inscribed by the author to publisher Seymour Lawrence and signed only as "the witch." Spine sunned; else fine in wrappers. A nice association copy. [#004289] $575
For notifications of our sale lists, new arrivals, new catalogs, or other e-lists, subscribe to our email list:
*:
:
:

Note: Your email will not be shared and will only be used for Lopezbooks.com announcements.

Corinne Demas Archive for Eleven Stories High: Growing Up in Stuyvesant Town, 1948–68 Signed Books for $19 From the Library of Robert Stone