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Note: Sale prices are net prices -- no further discounts apply.

All books are first printings of first editions or first American editions unless otherwise noted.

(London), Survival International, (various dates). Five items: Robin Hanbury-Tenison's Report of a Visit to the Indians of Brazil on Behalf of the Primitive People's Fund/Survival International (1971); Left Out? The Indians and the Canadian Constitution, published in conjunction with the National Indian Brotherhood of Canada, c. 1979; the Annual Review 1988; an Urgent Action Bulletin, September 1994; and an undated promotional pamphlet. Each is near fine or better. [#018451] $40
$20
(Anthology)
click for a larger image of item #32966, McSweeney's Mammoth Treasury of Thrilling Tales NY, Vintage Books, (2003). The uncorrected proof copy of the Vintage edition (previously published, in slightly different form, as issue #10 of McSweeney's Quarterly). Signed by editor Michael Chabon and contributors Sherman Alexie, Harlan Ellison, Jim Shepard, and by Elmore Leonard, who has changed the title of his story to "Showdown at Checotah." Slight splaying to cover, else fine in wrappers. [#032966] SOLD
(Weston), Living Hand, (1974). His first book. Poetry, published as Living Hand 3, the third issue of the magazine that Auster founded and edited. Mild edge sunning and a couple of tiny spots on the rear cover; near fine in wrappers. [#911268] $200
$130
click for a larger image of item #28151, The Last Voyage of Somebody the Sailor Boston, Little Brown, (1991). Postmodern fiction meets Magical Realism, in a novel that takes place both in the contemporary world and in the ancient mythical realm of Sinbad and Scheherazade. Inscribed by the author: "For Bill & Jean, old shipmates, affectionately, Jack. 2/91." Inscribed to poet Bill Sylvester and his wife; a good personal and literary association. Slight spine slant and a small spine bump; near fine in a near fine dust jacket with an edge tear at the upper rear spine fold. [#028151] $100
$65
click for a larger image of item #33443, Trout Fishing in America; The Pill Versus the Springhill Mine Disaster; In Watermelon Sugar NY, Delacorte, (1969). A review copy of the first combined edition, and the first hardcover printing of Trout Fishing in America (the other two titles having appeared as hardcovers in signed limited editions). The text of each title is reproduced from the original editions, complete with title pages, copyright pages, etc. Spotting to the edges of the text block and lower corner of the final page; some rubbing to pictorial boards. Very good in a very good dust jacket with wear at the edges and folds, and a tiny burn mark on the front panel. [#033443] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #28091, Original Drawing for Tornado Alley 1988. An original drawing by Wilson for Burroughs' 1989 book Tornado Alley. This image was included in the exhibition "Ports of Entry: William Burroughs and the Arts" that was mounted by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 1996, and it is reproduced on page 140 of the exhibition catalog. Interestingly, the illustration in the book does not show some of the work that Wilson did, as it was done using nonrepro blue pencil which does not show up when photographed: Wilson's edits didn't appear in Tornado Alley and they don't appear in Ports of Entry, but they are quite visible in the work itself. Wilson, one of the great artists of the underground comix of the 1960s and beyond, whom R. Crumb has said was a major influence on Crumb's own work, collaborated with Burroughs on a number of projects. This is not only a significant work of art, and a significant association with Burroughs, but it is also signed by Wilson, who has added, "To Nelson" next to his signature: Wilson gave this work to his friend Nelson Lyon, who loaned it to the exhibition and is listed in the book as one of the lenders to the exhibit. This is, in effect, a three-way association: Nelson Lyon was the co-producer of Burroughs' Dead City Radio, a 1990 album of Burroughs reading his work (including pieces from Tornado Alley) against a background of experimental music by various artists. 9-3/4" x 6-3/4". Matted and framed. Fine. A notable association copy, and an artifact of one of the great collaborations that Burroughs engaged in. [#028091] $7,500
$5,625
click for a larger image of item #29577, Original Typescript of "Tribute to a Hero" 1933. 23 pages, carbon typescript, with approximately three dozen changes made in Cain's hand, and more than a dozen additional small variations between this text and the published version. Published in American Mercury in November 1933, "Tribute to a Hero," is an autobiographical piece about the Cain family following the father's 1903 job change from St. John's College at Annapolis to Washington College at Chestertown, MD, and the culture shock that ensued from this move to a "hick place" from one of "smartness, competence, and class," a state of affairs that was partially redeemed by the actions of "a great man" (with an assist from Cain's father) on the occasion of a Washington College-Maryland Agricultural College football game. Published the year before his first novel, The Postman Always Rings Twice (and following Our Government in 1930, nonfiction based on Cain's column for New York World). Called "one of Cain's finest essays" by David Madden in James M. Cain: Hard-Boiled Mythmaker. Carbon paper a bit yellowed, some pencil rubbing, not affecting text; near fine. An early manuscript of a boyhood epiphany by a writer who gained a place in the literary pantheon for his famous first novel, which is still considered one of the high spots of American hard-boiled fiction. [#029577] $2,500
$1,875
NY, Doubleday/Talese, (2007). Inscribed by the author to Robert Stone and his wife, with an added "Thank you! For sharing your wisdom! For being my teacher!" Stone has provided a blurb for the rear cover. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#033708] $50
$25
London, Secker & Warburg, (2001). Essays, mostly on literary subjects, including Robinson Crusoe, which formed the basis for Coetzee's novel, Foe, as well as Kafka, Musil, Borges, Rushdie, Harry Mulisch's The Discovery of Heaven, South African writers including Doris Lessing, Nadine Gordimer, Alan Paton and others, and other topics. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#031562] $40
$20
(Hay), Hay Festival Press, 2004. The first separate appearance of this story, with an introduction by De Bernieres for this edition. Number 63 of 100 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine without dust jacket, as issued. [#911483] $250
$163
click for a larger image of item #30714, Broken Vessels Boston, Godine, (1991). His first book of nonfiction, a collection of essays, which was a finalist for the 19992 Pulitzer Prize in the category of General Nonfiction. Inscribed by Dubus to another author (of children's books) who at the time lived in a neighboring town. Also signed in full by Dubus on the title page. Fine in a fine dust jacket. A nice literary association, and a reminder that Dubus was famous for being supportive of, and a mentor to, younger writers: for many years he held a weekly writers' workshop in his home, free of charge, as a way (he said) of giving back for all the help he received from his literary friends and colleagues after his traumatic accident. [#030714] $125
$81
(Otisville), Birch Brook, (1989). The first separate appearance of this story from The Times Are Never So Bad. A small, attractive letterpress limited edition. One of 300 numbered copies, signed by the author. Approximately 6" x 4-1/2". Mild spine roll, else fine in wrappers. [#912453] $175
$114
click for a larger image of item #10351, The Samisdat Poems of W.D. Ehrhart Richford, Samisdat, 1980. An omnibus volume collecting the poems in his three earlier Samisdat pamphlets, along with new poems. Fine in wrappers. [#010351] $40
$20
click for a larger image of item #15553, Typed Note Signed 1990. October 24, 1990. Elkin effusively thanks the recipient for comments on his recent article and apparently for having sent him soap, a subject that had come up in the article: ". . . thank you most of all for those wonderful wrapped emulsifiers and alkali-reamed fats, those delicious sodium and potassium salts and acids. Man, if I had your job I'd have been World Soap Czar by now!" Signed by the author. Folded for mailing; else fine, with hand-addressed mailing envelope. [#015553] $95
$48
click for a larger image of item #1425, The Orchid Stories Garden City, Doubleday, 1973. The uncorrected proof copy of this large collection of stories and prose poems, in the form of tall, bound galley sheets printed on rectos only. Stamped "Final Galley." A number of the galley pages are loose but all are present. Near fine in wrappers and signed by the author. Scarce, fragile format. [#001425] SOLD
London, Jonathan Cape, (1985). Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#912575] $200
$130
click for a larger image of item #33674, Moon Crossing Bridge (St. Paul), Graywolf, (1992). A collection of poetry, much of it reflecting on the death of her husband, Raymond Carver. Inscribed by Gallagher to Robert Stone: "For Bob -- many rivers & bridges, that one man we knew & loved -- Ray -- Love, Tess." Dated in Port Angeles, 6/2/92." Fine in a near fine, spine-sunned dust jacket with a closed gutter tear. [#033674] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #24524, What Is To Be Done? (Ontario), Quadrant Editions, 1983. Gallant's first play, written for television. Signed by the author. Gallant is most well-known for her short stories, and her collection Home Truths won the 1982 Governor General's Award, Canada's highest literary honor. A fine copy of the issue in wrappers. [#024524] $95
$48
Chapel Hill, Algonquin, 1987. Her highly acclaimed first novel, which won the Sue Kaufman Prize for First Fiction of the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters and was awarded a special citation by the Ernest Hemingway Foundation. It was also selected in London as one of the 20 best novels of the 20th century, and has become a classic coming-of-age novel and a part of the canon, frequently being combined on school reading lists with The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, To Kill a Mockingbird, and The Catcher in the Rye. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#913574] $100
$65
NY, Random House, (1994). The uncorrected proof copy, lacking the first page, which contained the publisher's text describing the book and, very briefly, the author, and was excised from most copies, reportedly at the author's request. From the library of author Peter Matthiessen, bearing his notes only on the final page: "Harada Roshi/ 'world is full of dread'/ huge clean wind." Foxed; very good in wrappers. [#032257] $40
$20
click for a larger image of item #32788, "For Fitch, Retired" in Year of Dog, Vol. 1, No. 1 (Putney), Year of Dog Press, 1972. A very early Irving appearance, a poem, in one of 650 numbered copies of this attractively printed and bound anthology. This is Copy No. 83. Signed by printers and designers Georgia Gojmerac and Kelly Lee. Robert Bly also contributes, among many others. Fine in a fine dust jacket that is adhered to the rear board, possibly by design. [#032788] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #33521, The Natural History of Selborne London, Cassell and Company, 1902. First thus: White's 1789 classic of natural history, here with a 7-page introduction by Richard Kearton and 123 photographs by the Kearton brothers, Richard and Cherry. Signed by both Keartons. Hinges just starting; a very good copy, without dust jacket. [#033521] $500
$325
click for a larger image of item #30739, No Rest for the Wicked (Stockholm), Imaginary Worlds, (2001). Keene's virtually unfindable first book, a collection of stories published by a short-lived specialty press in Sweden, whose books were printed in quantities measured in the hundreds. Warmly inscribed by the author in the year of publication. Keene has since gone on to win two Bram Stoker awards, including one for his first novel in 2003, The Rising, an early novel in the zombie craze that has pervaded pop culture in recent years. Bookplate of the recipient, another author, on the front flyleaf. A couple of small spots to the cloth; near fine in a very near fine dust jacket with a couple of tiny nicks along the folds. Laid in is the brochure for Keene's instructional program on Guerilla Marketing. Scarce. [#030739] $850
$595
click for a larger image of item #31419, Oregon Trail 1975-2000 Eugene, Bend in the River Council, (1974). An ambitious project conceived by Kesey (as Co-Director) and others to form a Council to address the major problems facing Oregon (and by extension, the U.S.) in a manner which would expose the issues to the public at large and allow for public input. This is a press kit cum prospectus for the council, including numerous separate pieces, e.g. a copy of a letter to Kesey from the Governor, lauding the project; a two-page set of proposals for the creation of the council and its structure and agenda; two issues of The Bend in the River Reality, a broadsheet newspaper, to which Ken Kesey and Ken Babbs, among others, contribute to Issue 1, the "Special Armory Issue," and the same contributions appear in Issue Number 2, the "Special Coast Issue"; there are two magazine-format issues of The BITR Papers, with different color covers and variant content, some of which overlaps with other items in the lot. The intent of the project was to create an educated, informed "Enlightened Constituency" that would "influence not only the state's politicians, the populace and the industry, but the future course of her sister states as well, and thus help steer this nation through the uncharted waters before us." While it may not be attributable to this particular effort, Oregon has become something of a bellwether for the rest of the region and for the country as a whole; one way or another, the project has in many ways largely come to fruition. All housed in a Bend in the River Council folder. Edge-sunned and musty; very good. Rare. [#031419] $565
$396
click for a larger image of item #31417, Sometimes a Great Notion Universal City, Universal Studios, 1970. Gay's screenplay based on Kesey's second novel, after One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, but his first novel to be brought to the screen. The novel concerns the Stamper family, an independent, sometimes ornery group of Oregon loggers. The film was directed by Paul Newman and starred Newman, Henry Fonda and Lee Remick, and it has fallen into undeserved obscurity: it was nominated for two Academy Awards and many consider it one of the last great performances of Fonda's career. This is labeled "Second Draft Screenplay," dated by hand February 10, 1970, with the name of legendary Hollywood editor Dede Allen written on the front cover (Allen is not credited on the film). Bradbound in studio wrappers; a bit dusty, but near fine. [#031417] $490
$319
click for a larger image of item #29934, Final Judgement Construction Company Annual Report & Literary Journal (n.p.), Well-Defended Press, 1990. A spoof on corporate reports, with contributions by a number of Canadian writers including Kinsella, Ann Knight, Spider Robinson, and others. Kinsella contributes "An excerpt from my essay, Treacherous Snivelling and Other Dangerous Trends in Contemporary U.S. Poetry." Also includes a poem (in Latin) by "Silas Ermineskin," a Kinsella alter-ego and one of the central characters in a number of Kinsella's highly praised Indian stories. Ermineskin's contribution is signed by "Ermineskin," somewhat illegibly. Also signed by Kinsella, Knight, Robinson and five others, presumably all the contributors, although the use of pseudonyms on the contributions makes it impossible to determine, from internal evidence alone, if this is the case. Folded sheets, with plain card-stock covers: apparently a home-made production by someone with a copier, a laser printer, and the friendship of a number of Canadian literary figures. Although the limitation is not stated, and the production methods did not preclude creation of more copies, we are told that there were 30 copies done. 24 pages, folded sheets in cardstock covers. OCLC locates only one copy, in the Canadian national archives. Fine. [#029934] $750
$525
(London), Golden Handshake, (1997). Inscribed by the author to Robert Stone and his wife "Miss you!" Near fine in wrappers. The cover has a label offering a CD inside; no CD included. [#033796] $50
$25
London, Polytantric Press, 1975. Inscribed by the author to Robert Stone and his wife: "I'm gonna read at Bradlys March 14th/ Maybe you guys'll come see me. I miss you." Light corner creasing and lamination peeling; near fine in wrappers. [#033800] $60
$30
Holyoke, Crossroads Press, 1999. The uncorrected proof copy of this limited edition. Signed by the author. Comb-bound with both printed and acetate covers. Stamp of Stanley Wiater on half title; near fine in wrappers. Scarce. [#029498] $115
$75
click for a larger image of item #911061, Morrab [Penzance], [Morrab Library], 1997. Le Carre's speech accepting the presidency of the Morrab Library. Computer printout; thirteen pages; double-spaced on cream paper; one of approximately 50 copies signed by Le Carre. Fine. [#911061] $375
$244
click for a larger image of item #32490, Pili's Wall (Santa Barbara), Unicorn Press, (1971). Poetry chapbook by this Pulitzer Prize-winning poet who later became Poet Laureate of the U.S. One of 500 copies in wrappers, of a total edition of 750. Inscribed by the author to Peter [Matthiessen]. Foxed, musty; very good in wrappers and a very good dust jacket. [#032490] $265
$172
(Springfield), Gauntlet, (1999). The advance reading copy. Stamp of another author on specifications page, faint foxing to top edge; else fine in wrappers. [#031027] $60
$30
Norwalk, Easton Press, 1997. One of the author's own copies of the leatherbound limited edition of the second novel in the Watson Trilogy, which later became Shadow Country. Unmarked, but from the library of Peter Matthiessen. Shrink-wrapped. Fine. [#032013] $115
$75
NY, Dutton, (1986). The uncorrected proof copy of this collection of stories. Signed by the author. Trace sunning to spine; still fine in wrappers. [#911717] $100
$65
NY, Knopf, 1975. Inscribed by the author in 1977 to another poet, "who has befriended Hazard and his grateful friend the author." Recipient's handmade bookplate front flyleaf; a near fine copy, with the main dust jacket sections clipped and attached to the boards. A nice literary association copy. [#023011] $40
$20
NY, Saturday Review Press/Dutton, 1974. Inscribed by the author to Robert Stone, in the year of publication, "in friendship and with great regard for your work -- and let's see more of it!" Push to spine, a very good copy in a very good, age-toned dust jacket with a small nick to the upper front panel. [#033804] SOLD
The first Japanese edition. Fine in wrappers, with publisher's wraparound band. Signed by the author. [#019574] $60
$30
(NY), HarperCollins, (2005). Inscribed by the author to Robert Stone and his wife: "Thanks for the inspiration! Enjoy." Fine in a fine dust jacket. With an interview with Olson laid in. [#033766] $45
$23
Tucson, Blue Moon Press, 1978. A collection of short stories. Cover photograph by Lee Marmon. Inscribed by the author to a Native American poet "in brotherhood and strength." Near fine in wrappers. An excellent association copy. [#025678] $150
$98
(n.p.), Fox Run Press, 2005. One of 94 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine in riveted wrappers. [#914581] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #31745, Shadow Box NY, Putnam's, (1977). A working copy of the uncorrected proof, with more than a half dozen of Plimpton's photocopied inserts stapled to existing pages, notations where the inserts occur, and a renumbering of chapters after Chapter 17 is broken in two. "Zeroxes [sic] of Plimpton corrections attached" written on front cover. Handling apparent to covers; reading creases to spine; very good in wrappers. An interesting glimpse of both the work-in-progress and the publication methodology of the 1970s: an artifact of a now long-gone era. [#031745] $500
$325
Vienna, AUSTRIA, Phaidon, 1936. First Edition. Yellow cloth with gold decorations. Near fine in very good dust jacket (edge-worn, scored). [#600016] $60
$30
click for a larger image of item #21689, White Velvet Garden City, Doubleday Doran, 1936. A novel by the prolific British author of the classic Fu Manchu series of fantasy novels, which were immortalized in a series of films, first in the 1930s and then again in the 1960s. Inscribed by Rohmer, "with love," and signed with his trademark "$ax." Bookplate front pastedown; spine-sunned; handling to boards; very good in a very good, modestly edgeworn dust jacket with a dusty rear panel. Books signed by Rohmer are uncommon these days, especially in collectible condition and in dust jacket. [#021689] $1,250
$938
click for a larger image of item #30137, Farm NY/(Chicago), Feature/ICI, (1988). An early issue of this small periodical of gay fiction, printing Sedaris' story "My Manuscript," which was collected in his first book, Barrel Fever, in 1994: there are enough textual differences between this version and the collected version to consider this text an earlier draft. An uncommon early appearance by Sedaris. [#030137] $750
$525
click for a larger image of item #29530, Others Ottawa, Borealis, 1972. The first book, a collection of poetry, by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Stone Diaries. Inscribed by Shields to the Canadian poet and novelist Rosemary Aubert: "For Rosemary/ with thanks for a delightful evening/ Carol Shields." Spine faded, with a little tear to the spine base; near fine in wrappers. A nice literary association copy of an important first book. [#029530] $750
$525
click for a larger image of item #11637, Query (n.p.), Albondocani, (1974). A card with a poem by Updike, used as a holiday greeting. One of 75 copies of the suppressed first issue, with the front cover drawing printed upside down. Fine in stapled wrappers. Uncommon. [#011637] $150
$98
click for a larger image of item #30282, The Dick Cavett Show. A Conversation with John Updike (n.p.), (n.p.), 1978. Transcript of two consecutive nights of Updike's appearances on The Dick Cavett Show in December 1978. Ten pages and eleven pages, respectively, plus cover sheet. Printed on rectos only. Near fine, in a blue acetate folder that has split along its fold. DeBellis and Broomfield A68. Later collected in Conversations with John Updike. [#030282] $565
$396
NY, Knopf, 1966. The first issue of this collection of stories, with the transposed lines on page 46. Signed by the author. Light splaying to boards; else fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#912072] $450
$293
Franklin Center, Franklin Library, 1997. The Franklin Library edition of this novel, which was initially published to mixed reviews: Margaret Atwood, in The New York Times Book Review, loved it; David Foster Wallace, a self-proclaimed Updike fan, wrote a scathing review of it in The New York Observer. Signed by the author, with a special introduction by him for this edition. Leatherbound, page edges gilt, with a silk ribbon marker bound in. Fine. [#013863] $95
$48
click for a larger image of item #30149, The Eighth Day NY, Harper, (1967). The three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning (Our Town, The Skin of Our Teeth, The Bridge of San Luis Rey) author's National Book Award winning novel. Inscribed by the author: "For JEAN and WALTER with deep regard and affection ever/ Thornton/ March 21, 1967." As with another copy of this book that was inscribed by Wilder on the same day, the recipients names are filled in in what appears to be a child's hand, while the inscription itself is in Wilder's small cursive. We are unaware of the point of this. We do know that Wilder was in New York on this date, and that he had reason to behold the Pulitzer Prize-winning critic Walter Kerr and his wife, the writer Jean Kerr (of Please Don't Eat the Daisies fame) with deep regard and affection: Walter Kerr lauded Wilder's work repeatedly in the 1960s, from his off-Broadway work ("the very special voice of Thornton Wilder...the homely, jaunty, gently poetic sound of it..."), to the cultural phenomenon that was Hello, Dolly!, which was based on Wilder's The Matchmaker. This is conjecture on our part, but suffice it to say we could not come up with another New York Jean and Walter that would fit the bill here. Regardless, an undeniably gorgeous, inscribed copy of a National Book Award winner: fine in a fine dust jacket. [#030149] $1,500
$1,125
Derry & Ridgewood, Babcock & Koontz, (1989). A short story printed in a handsome limited edition by the Coffee House Press. With a frontispiece illustration by Gaylord Schanilec. Of a total edition of 240 copies, this is one of 40 Roman-numeraled copies signed by the author and the artist. Fine without dust jacket, as issued. [#915718] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #11666, Children of the Ritz Sydney, Cornstalk Publishing, 1927. The first Australian edition of this early book by Woolrich, published the year after his first book. In the 1940s and '50s, Woolrich, writing under his own name and also as William Irish and George Hopley, wrote some of the classic volumes of noir fiction of the era, a large number of which were turned into the movies that defined film noir and gave it its cultural importance and artistic stature. Foxing to pages, as is typical with this edition; minor spotting and fraying to the spine. Very good, lacking dust jacket. [#011666] $115
$75
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Uncorrected Proofs and Advance Copies Catalog 171