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Note: Sale prices are net prices -- no further discounts apply.

All books are first printings of first editions or first American editions unless otherwise noted.

(Washington, D.C.), Survival International U.S.A., (1981-1982). Volume 1, No. 1 and Volume 2, Nos. 2, 3/4. Four issues (one double issue, so 3 items). One issue folded for mailing; two issues sunned; near fine. [#018432] $40
$20
click for a larger image of item #25307, Earlier New Rochelle, Elizabeth Press, (1972). One of an unspecified number of hardcover copies, of a total edition of 400 copies. Inscribed by the author to Joseph and Carol Bruchac in 1982, a nice association copy. Slightly spine-faded else fine in publisher's cardboard slipcase, which is near fine. [#025307] $150
$98
click for a larger image of item #6249, The South Dakota Guidebook (NY), New Rivers Press, 1974. The second book, a collection of poetry, by the author of First Light, and others. This is the simultaneous issue in wrappers. The total edition was 600 copies, of which 400 were issued in wrappers and 200 in cloth. Baxter's first book was a poetry collection published four years earlier. Well-known these days as a writer of fiction, his first novel wasn't published until 1987, seventeen years after his first book and thirteen years after this volume. Near fine. A scarce title in either the hardcover or softcover issue. [#006249] $95
$48
NY, Scribner, (1962). His second book, again featuring Carlo Reinhart, after his discharge from the Army following World War II. Signed by the author. Faint sunning to the cloth at the spine extremities, else fine in a near fine dust jacket with light wear to the edges and folds. [#912266] $200
$130
click for a larger image of item #28091, Original Drawing for Tornado Alley 1988. An original drawing by Wilson for Burroughs' 1989 book Tornado Alley. This image was included in the exhibition "Ports of Entry: William Burroughs and the Arts" that was mounted by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 1996, and it is reproduced on page 140 of the exhibition catalog. Interestingly, the illustration in the book does not show some of the work that Wilson did, as it was done using nonrepro blue pencil which does not show up when photographed: Wilson's edits didn't appear in Tornado Alley and they don't appear in Ports of Entry, but they are quite visible in the work itself. Wilson, one of the great artists of the underground comix of the 1960s and beyond, whom R. Crumb has said was a major influence on Crumb's own work, collaborated with Burroughs on a number of projects. This is not only a significant work of art, and a significant association with Burroughs, but it is also signed by Wilson, who has added, "To Nelson" next to his signature: Wilson gave this work to his friend Nelson Lyon, who loaned it to the exhibition and is listed in the book as one of the lenders to the exhibit. This is, in effect, a three-way association: Nelson Lyon was the co-producer of Burroughs' Dead City Radio, a 1990 album of Burroughs reading his work (including pieces from Tornado Alley) against a background of experimental music by various artists. 9-3/4" x 6-3/4". Matted and framed. Fine. A notable association copy, and an artifact of one of the great collaborations that Burroughs engaged in. [#028091] $7,500
$5,625
Houston, Arte Publico Press, 1984. Inscribed by the author in 1986. Fine in wrappers. [#914438] $175
$114
1993. An apparently unproduced screenplay. Cook self-published Rent a Family as a novel in 2010. Claspbound photocopy in plain covers; near fine. [#030537] $40
$20
click for a larger image of item #34526, Shorter Lyrics of the Twentieth Century: 1900-1922 London, Poetry Bookshop, (1922). Later printing of this collection edited by Davies. With the 1924 ownership signature of Cheryl Crawford. Several poems marked with an "X" in pencil. Mild foxing; very good, without dust jacket. [#034526] $35
$18
London, Bachman & Turner, (1973). His first book, a satirical novel that was only published in England. Cocked, with some foxing to boards and prelims; very good in a very good dust jacket with a couple edge tears and a crease to the front flap. [#028618] $60
$30
click for a larger image of item #26009, Geode/Rock Body Santa Barbara, Capricorn Press, 1970. The first book by the author of The Solace of Open Spaces and Heart Mountain, among others, a collection of poems. This is one of 550 copies of the issue in wrappers, of a total edition of 600 copies. Inscribed by the author in 1992. Mild edge-sunning; else fine. [#026009] $225
$146
click for a larger image of item #23413, A Fan's Notes NY, Harper & Row, (1968). A second printing of his first book, "a fictional memoir" and one of the defining books of the Sixties, which helped blur the line between fiction and nonfiction much the way the New Journalism of that era did. A finalist for the National Book Award, winner of both the William Faulkner Foundation Award for best first novel and the Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Foundation Award of the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, for a work that, while not a commercial success, was nonetheless "a considerable literary achievement." Made into a movie in 1972, which was a finalist for the Golden Palm award at the Cannes Film Festival. While Exley's book was not a bestseller at the time, over the years it has remained in print, been brought out in a number of different editions, and is widely viewed as a classic of the 1960s. Signed by the author. Very slight spine slant; near fine in a near fine dust jacket with a couple short tears at the crown. [#023413] $640
$448
click for a larger image of item #32871, Original Drawing Undated. An anatomical sketch by Feitelson, working on a male form, with a rocking chair on the verso. 4-1/2" x 8". Unsigned, but accompanied by a signed copy of the magazine Minotaure from 1933. The sketch shows some light green watercolor on the page and is near fine; the magazine has endured some unsuccessful attempts at reinforcing with a tape binding; the covers are detached. The signature, "Property of Lorser Feitelson," appears on the upper edge of the front cover. Feitelson was one of the founders of what came to be called the Los Angeles School of painting, a post-surrealist style that developed into what became the "Hard Edge" style of abstraction. This drawing exhibits a classical approach to draftsmanship. The issue of Minotaure is number 3-4, and features writing by Andre Breton, Tristan Tzara, and others; photographs by Man Ray and Brassai, among others; and artwork by Picasso, Matisse, Miro and Dali, among others. A glimpse of the artist's work, and a well-used example of a key surrealist publication, that provides some context for the artwork. [#032871] $1,500
$1,125
(Hohenwold), (Book Source), (2000). A chapbook published as Oxford Series: Two. One of 500 numbered copies. Fine in saddle-stitched wrappers. [#913570] $200
$130
(Hohenwold), (Book Source), (1999). A chapbook published as Oxford Series: One. Number 173 of 250 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine in saddle-stitched wrappers. [#913569] SOLD
NY, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, (1974). His only children's book. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#912617] $350
$228
(London), Quartet Books, (1996). Inscribed by the author to Robert Stone, "with utmost admiration and respect." Fine in self-wrappers. [#033725] $50
$25
click for a larger image of item #16662, Song from the Earth. American Indian Painting Boston, New York Graphic Society, (1976). Highwater was one of the controversial figures in the field of Native American literature. He claimed to be of Blackfeet/Cherokee heritage, but critics disputed that and saw it as yet another case of exploitation of Native Americans -- in this case, Native American heritage and ethnicity itself, and the "authenticity" that comes with it -- by self-promoting whites. For nearly 30 years, though, "Highwater" -- his real name was Jackie Marks -- wrote extensively on American Indian culture and was one of the most visible promoters of Native American interests. He won awards for his writing and his other works, including some from Native American organizations and tribes. His ethnicity may have been a sham -- it was -- but for a time he was an important contemporary literary voice dealing with matters of Native American culture and heritage, with a hefty dose of self-promotion folded in. His writing was prolific, and his books -- on Native American painting, dance, and other subjects -- filled voids left by other writers and became landmarks in their fields. This title, Song From the Earth, an introduction to American Indian painting, and The Sweet Grass Lives On, a subsequent volume that introduced 50 contemporary American Indian artists, together helped launch the trend in collecting contemporary Indian art, and reviving memory of such artists as "the Kiowa Five," from the early 20th century, as well as promoting more contemporary artists. Inscribed by the author. Near fine in a near fine, price-clipped dust jacket worn at the corners and spine extremities. [#016662] $60
$30
click for a larger image of item #25104, Pure Fiction (NY), Weisbach/(Morrow), 1999. An advance excerpt from Homes' Music for Torching, together with an interview with Homes, a review, and praise for her earlier books. Also includes excerpts of work by Amanda Davis, Scott Lasser and Dale Peck. Fine in stapled wrappers, with accompanying CD, all housed in publisher's tri-fold folder. A highly unusual, multimedia publisher's promotional item. [#025104] $60
$30
September 14, 1978. To the editors of Farrar, Straus & Giroux: "I'm taking the liberty of submitting to you a ms. of short stories, not mine, that I think is worthy of consideration for publication..." The author on whose behalf Ignatow is writing is unnamed, although he does add that Grace Paley is interested in writing an introduction. One corner staple; editorial "logged in" remarks; folded in thirds; and typed on a machine that made only partial "o's." Near fine. [#013665] $40
$20
click for a larger image of item #32786, A Widow for One Year (n.p.), (n.p.), [ca. 1997-98]. An advance issue consisting of velobound, double-sided typescript. 743 pages. A very uncommon format -- we've seen this typescript once before, but in a different type of binding. It appears to predate any publisher's production of this title; the earlier copy we had seen had been sent to a U.K. reader whose blurb appeared on the U.K. advance reading copy. Velo binding cracked at the front, missing the bottom third; otherwise near fine. [#032786] $340
$221
London, Faber and Faber, (1986). His second novel, winner of the Whitbread Award and shortlisted for the Booker Prize. This is the second issue, printed by Richard Clay. Pages edges mildly darkened; still fine in a fine dust jacket. [#911630] $100
$65
(Dance)
click for a larger image of item #26729, Last Night on Earth NY, Pantheon, (1995). A book that is "part memoir, part meditation, and part performance" by the noted dancer and choreographer. Signed by Jones. Small quarto. This is the hardcover edition, fine in a near fine dust jacket with corner tears to the rear flap fold. [#026729] $40
$20
click for a larger image of item #31419, Oregon Trail 1975-2000 Eugene, Bend in the River Council, (1974). An ambitious project conceived by Kesey (as Co-Director) and others to form a Council to address the major problems facing Oregon (and by extension, the U.S.) in a manner which would expose the issues to the public at large and allow for public input. This is a press kit cum prospectus for the council, including numerous separate pieces, e.g. a copy of a letter to Kesey from the Governor, lauding the project; a two-page set of proposals for the creation of the council and its structure and agenda; two issues of The Bend in the River Reality, a broadsheet newspaper, to which Ken Kesey and Ken Babbs, among others, contribute to Issue 1, the "Special Armory Issue," and the same contributions appear in Issue Number 2, the "Special Coast Issue"; there are two magazine-format issues of The BITR Papers, with different color covers and variant content, some of which overlaps with other items in the lot. The intent of the project was to create an educated, informed "Enlightened Constituency" that would "influence not only the state's politicians, the populace and the industry, but the future course of her sister states as well, and thus help steer this nation through the uncharted waters before us." While it may not be attributable to this particular effort, Oregon has become something of a bellwether for the rest of the region and for the country as a whole; one way or another, the project has in many ways largely come to fruition. All housed in a Bend in the River Council folder. Edge-sunned and musty; very good. Rare. [#031419] $565
$396
(NY), Plume, (1996). First thus: a collection of the four early Bachman novels, Rage, The Long Walk, Roadwork and Running Man, but with a brand new introduction by King, "The Importance of Being Bachman." The first omnibus edition, in 1985, had a different introduction by King. Stamp of another writer inside the front cover; fine in wrappers. [#030297] $95
$48
NY, New American Library, (1989). The advance reading copy. Inscribed by the author (but not signed) to Robert Stone and his wife. Very good in wrappers. [#033747] $75
$38
click for a larger image of item #32707, Pictures of Fidelman NY, Farrar Straus Giroux, (1969). A novel in the form of six related short stories, three of which had appeared in earlier collections of his, two of which were uncollected, and one of which was previously unpublished. Inscribed by Malamud, "For Mike and Katharine/ With love/ Bern," presumably his long-time friends Michael Seide and his wife. Fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#032707] $265
$172
click for a larger image of item #29978, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time Promotional Card London, David Fickling, 2003. A promotional postcard for Haddon's Whitbread Award winning book, which was released simultaneously in an edition for adults by Jonathan Cape and for children by David Fickling. Fickling issued a set of promotional postcards with Volkswagens of varying colors (of significance to the protagonist): three of the five cards featured author quotes; one had a quote from the publisher; one had a quote from the book. McEwan's card reads: "A superb achievement...a wise and bleakly funny writer with rare gifts of empathy." The other two authors quoted in this set of five are Arthur Golden and Oliver Sacks. In addition to the Whitbread, the book won the Guardian Children's Fiction Prize. Fine. [#029978] $55
$28
NY, Random House, (1984). The uncorrected proof copy. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#911714] $250
$163
click for a larger image of item #27323, Art & Outrage London/NY, Putnam/Dutton, 1959/1961. A review copy of the American edition, consisting of the true first (British) edition, copyedited on the title page and front flap to reflect changes to be made in the American edition, with a pencil note on the front flyleaf about the projected change in size. With review slip laid in. Correspondence about Miller between Lawrence Durrell and Alfred Perles, with interjections by Miller. Miller met both Durrell and Perles in Paris in the Thirties. Dusty top edge; fine in a very near fine dust jacket. Together with a copy of the American edition, as issued. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#027323] $115
$75
click for a larger image of item #33645, Autograph Letter Signed 1958. An autograph letter signed from Miller to editor and publisher Pascal (Pat) Covici, regarding R.K. Narayan's book The Guide. A full page, plus one margin, of Miller's writing in pencil, praising Narayan's book and asking about others. Two passages are bracketed in red, presumably by Covici, and marked "excerpt." In the second of these, Miller writes, "I was amazed that a man of his world could exhibit such a modern technique. To boot, he's a born story teller. With a fine sense of the tragi-comic." Dated in Big Sur, 6/13/58. Another hand has added, "File H. Miller." Browned, else fine. Good literary content. [#033645] $500
$325
(Milano), (All Insegna del Pesce D'oro), (1962). The first Italian edition of Obscenity and the Law of Reflection, a volume first published in 1945 at the Alicat Book Shop. One of 2000 numbered copies, with 30 pages of photographs not in the original volume. Approximately 3 3/4" x 5". Fine in wrappers, with dust jacket, and wraparound band. [#017195] $40
$20
(Sports and Fitness)
click for a larger image of item #32322, Typed Letter Signed, with Vim and Vigor 1964. May 15, 1964. Hall of Famer Musial ("Stan the Man") played baseball for the St. Louis Cardinals from 1941 to 1963 (minus one year in the Navy); in February, 1964, he began a three-year term as Consultant to the President on Physical Fitness, under President Lyndon Johnson. This (form) letter, written on White House stationery, addressed to the Public Relations Director of the L.A. Dodgers, and signed by Musial as "Stan," asks for help, "since we don't have funds for advertising" in publicizing "two new books -- Vim for girls, Vigor for boys -- which explain how important [exercise] can be to their future." Included here are copies of Vim and Vigor, "A Complete Exercise Plan for Girls/Boys 12 to 18." [Washington, D.C.: President's Council on Physical Fitness, 1964]. Each is 24 pages, leading off with a Presidential Message from Johnson and concluding with a message from President Kennedy "prepared especially for this book in November, 1963." The 50+ year old advice is surprisingly current, and the advice across the two genders is surprisingly balanced. The letter is fine; the booklets are very good (Vim) and near fine (Vigor) in stapled wrappers. An example of the youthful President Kennedy's foresight in his emphasis on physical fitness, and the subsequent President taking up the mantle to continue his effort with the help of one of the athletic superstars of the day. [#032322] $565
$396
NY, David McKay, (1965). His first novel. Some loss to spine lettering and modest handling to boards; near fine in a very near fine dust jacket with one short edge tear on the upper front panel. [#911784] $200
$130
click for a larger image of item #32506, Simple Gifts (Thetford), Self-Published, (2001). The uncorrected proof copy, published by Nichols himself in an edition of 100 copies. Inscribed by the author to Peter Matthiessen and with an autograph note signed laid in, written across the top of a photocopied letter to friends about the writing of the work. This proof covers "Part One - Revised" and "Beginning Part Two." As best as we can tell, Simple Gifts remains unpublished. Nichols died in 2010. The Vermont author was a neighbor and friend of Grace Paley and of Peter Schumann, the founder and director of the Bread and Puppet Theater. The letter is folded and near fine; the proof is fine in wrappers. [#032506] $190
$124
NY, Doubleday, (1994). The advance reading copy of his second book, first novel. Winner of the 1993 Pirates Alley William Faulkner Prize for the Novel. Inscribed by the author: "For ___, this cold, cold book. Stay warm!" Fine in wrappers. [#030018] $115
$75
NY, Hyperion/Miramax, (1996). The Minghella screenplay for the film based on Ondaatje's novel. With an introduction by Michael Ondaatje. Signed by Ondaatje at his introduction. Illustrated with photos from the movie. Fine in wrappers. [#913390] $150
$98
click for a larger image of item #31477, Trust (NY), New American Library, (1966). The uncorrected proof copy of her first book, one of a handful of literary first novels published by NAL during the mid-60s, including John Gardner's The Resurrection and William Gass's Omensetter's Luck. Tall, comb-bound galley sheets. Laid in is a letter sent by editor David Segal to author John Barth, sending him "yet another first novel" and requesting "the pleasure of reading your opinion," as it appears Barth had made it clear that he would not be offering "a quotable quote." A noteworthy letter: Segal took over the newly founded hardcover publishing branch of New American Library, which previously had specialized in paperback publishing only -- notably the Signet and Mentor imprints, which reprinted classics and bestsellers. Segal immediately began publishing literary fiction by young, unknown writers, and in the course of a couple of years introduced William Gass, John Gardner, Michael Shaara, Alice Adams and Cynthia Ozick to the world, all of whom went on to become major American authors. It's a bit surprising that Barth would have been averse to providing a "quotable quote" for the likes of these, but apparently that was the case. This copy is signed by Barth on the first page and with his address stamp on the front cover. Ozick's name was left off the cover and has been added in ink. Mild sunning and curling to the covers; small tear at upper spine; about near fine. A very scarce proof of an important first book, and a copy with exceptionally interesting provenance. [#031477] $1,500
$1,125
click for a larger image of item #1806, To Say if You Love Someone Prairie City, Decker Press, (1948). An unrecorded variant of this uncommon title. Gray cloth with the same design as that of the apparently first issue yellow cloth, in a purple and pink floral dust jacket with red and blue lettering, a $2 "Gift Edition" price, and different jacket copy. Near fine in a good dust jacket: the front flap has separated and is laid in. [#001806] $565
$396
click for a larger image of item #33894, Helen; or, Will She Save Him? Cleveland, Sayers, 1902. A dedication copy (albeit the fifth edition) of this temperance novel arguing that women can not reform men who drink too much, through marriage. This copy is inscribed by the author to her youngest daughter, Emma who, along with her two sisters, is a dedicatee of the book: "Emma M. Perkins/ from La Mere/ Mar 8, 1903." Emma was valedictorian of her class at Vassar, in 1879, after which she moved to Cleveland, where she was soon joined by her widowed mother, who passed away two years after this inscription. Emma Perkins never married. A bit of rubbing to the corners and rear board; front hinge starting; still a very good or better copy, without dust jacket. [#033894] $300
$195
(London), Little Brown, (2004). The advance reading copy of the British edition of this massive novel, which was loosely based on the author's life story, including his escape from an Australian prison and living on the run for a number of years. He wrote the novel while in prison, after being recaptured, and it became a bestseller. He is now working on a sequel to it. Labeled "uncorrected bound proof." Fine in wrappers. Uncommon in an advance issue. [#914678] $250
$163
(Greensboro), Unicorn Press, (1974). Poems from the "Poland 1931" sequence. Inscribed by Rothenberg to Clayton [Eshleman], "with admiration & thanks for the encouragements & challenge." Illustrated with posed photographs featuring Rothenberg and Kathy Acker, among others. One of 2000 copies in wrappers. Near fine. [#033542] $65
$33
click for a larger image of item #33535, The Flight of Quetzalcoatl Brighton, Unicorn, 1967. Translation of an Aztec myth/song, rendered into Spanish verse in the 16th century and then adapted into Spanish prose, from which this translation was done. Of a total edition of 426 copies, this is Letter X of 26 lettered copies, signed by Rothenberg and by Tony Bennett, who designed the cover. Near fine in stapled wrappers. [#033535] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #33531, Sightings/Lunes (NY), (Hawk's Well Press), (1964). Inscribed by Rothenberg in 1965 to Clay [Clayton Eshleman] and Barbara: "these poems for light and all." Two volumes in one: Sightings by Rothenberg and Lunes by Kelly, published by Rothenberg's small press. The glue has failed on the tipped-in drawings by Amy Mendelson; the drawings are now laid in; otherwise near fine in wrappers. Laid in is a small sheet printing instructions for reading "Sightings" by Rothenberg, and similar instructions for "Lunes" by Kelly on the verso. In addition there is an announcement of the 1965 birth of Rothenberg's son laid in. A nice association, with scarce ephemera laid in. [#033531] $125
$81
click for a larger image of item #29530, Others Ottawa, Borealis, 1972. The first book, a collection of poetry, by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Stone Diaries. Inscribed by Shields to the Canadian poet and novelist Rosemary Aubert: "For Rosemary/ with thanks for a delightful evening/ Carol Shields." Spine faded, with a little tear to the spine base; near fine in wrappers. A nice literary association copy of an important first book. [#029530] $750
$525
Chapel Hill, Mud Puppy Press, (1988). Of a total edition of 400 copies, this is number 48 of 374 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine, without dust jacket, as issued. [#915585] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #34473, Three Poem Broadsides (San Francisco), (San Francisco), (1963-1964). Three broadsides: Gary Snyder's Nanao Knows, Lew Welch's Step Out Onto the Planet, and Philip Whalen's Three Mornings. Each reproduced by photo-offset from the author's own calligraphy and printed in an edition of 300 copies on the occasion of a reading at Longshoreman's Hall, San Francisco, June 12, 1964. Each broadside is signed by its author. Snyder, Welch and Whalen first met when they attended Reed College, a progressive school in Oregon; the friends later became three of the most influential poets of the Beat generation. The Welch is sunned with two creases; the Snyder and Whalen have some light creases and edge sunning and are also signed by an unknown hand in an upper margin, with "much happiness." A very good set. 9-1/2" x 12-1/2". Publisher's postcard prospectus laid in. [McNeil A7.] [#034473] $700
$490
(NY), Dell, (1973). Inscribed by Solow to Pauline Kael: "To Pauline -- The mother of all us movie lovers -- Marty." A paperback original; near fine. [#034582] $35
$18
click for a larger image of item #26396, Wedding Card Signed 1990. An autograph wedding greeting to longtime friend Nelson Lyon, crafted on a Lou Beach collaged image. Lyon was responsible for getting Southern a job on Saturday Night Live in the 1980s when Southern was hard-pressed for both money and paying work, and he directed and co-produced, with SNL music director Hal Wilner, Southern's spoken word CD, "Give Me Your Hump." Lyon was also famous, or infamous, for having been with John Belushi the night Belushi died of a drug overdose. Signed "Uncle Ter." 8-1/2" x 11"; glue stains on verso; else fine. [#026396] $225
$146
click for a larger image of item #33357, Dog Soldiers Typescript [Boston], [Houghton Mifflin], [1974]. The photocopied typescript of Stone's second novel, winner of the National Book Award and one of the best novels to link the impact of the Vietnam war on American society in the Sixties to the dark side of that era -- the official corruption and the underside of the drug experiences of a generation. Bearing the [now crossed out] working title: Skydiver Devoured By Starving Birds. The title appears in a scene in the novel; it also appears in Stone's memoir, in an account of his time working for a tabloid newspaper where the writers were given headlines made up by other writers and had to create stories around them. The one time it appeared in print was in the excerpt from Dog Soldiers that appeared in the newsprint literary magazine, Fiction, in 1973. Stone's piece was called "Starving Birds" and at the end was identified as being from "Skydiver Devoured by Starving Birds." According to a 1987 letter of provenance, this copy was generated by the publisher and sent to the Book of the Month Club for early consideration for possible book club adoption. The pages bear, at the bottom, a torn Book of the Month Club filing sticker. 318 pages, plus cover sheet. The cover sheet and the letter of provenance are each signed by Robert Stone. The quality of the paper varies: several sheets have the blue tone of a mimeo. Near fine or better, in the bottom half of a manuscript box and the folding cardstock case of the Book of the Month Club, at this point more artifactual than protective. As far as we can tell, a unique copy of this award-winning novel, the basis for the highly regarded film Who'll Stop the Rain? [#033357] $1,500
$1,125
Dickinson, Dickinson State College, 1974. Tate served as poetry editor for this annual publication, and here contributes an insightful and amusing three-page introduction. The collection includes, among other things, Stratis Haviaras's first poems in English. Spine-sunned, near fine in wrappers, with the stamp of a previous owner inside the front cover. [#030830] $40
$20
(Haiti)
click for a larger image of item #18565, Canape-Vert NY, Farrar & Rinehart, (1944). A novel of Haiti by these two Haitian brothers, which won a prize in the Second Latin American literature contest sponsored by Farrar & Rinehart. Inscribed by Thoby-Marcelin to Barbara Howes in 1971. Poet Barbara Howes edited From the Green Antilles, one of the first anthologies of Caribbean literature to appear in the U.S., in 1966. She was married to the poet William Jay Smith. This book has the Howes/Smith bookplate on the front pastedown. Translated by Edward Larocque Tinker, who designed and illustrated the book, and who provides an introduction to it entitled "Haitian Background," explaining both the history and the metaphysics of Haitian religious beliefs. Fine in a good, price-clipped dust jacket threatening to split at the flap folds. An important book, and especially scarce signed. [#018565] $340
$221
click for a larger image of item #30282, The Dick Cavett Show. A Conversation with John Updike (n.p.), (n.p.), 1978. Transcript of two consecutive nights of Updike's appearances on The Dick Cavett Show in December 1978. Ten pages and eleven pages, respectively, plus cover sheet. Printed on rectos only. Near fine, in a blue acetate folder that has split along its fold. DeBellis and Broomfield A68. Later collected in Conversations with John Updike. [#030282] $565
$396
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Catalog 172