Subscribe

Weekly Sale

-

Note: Sale prices are net prices -- no further discounts apply.

All books are first printings of first editions or first American editions unless otherwise noted.

NY, Random House, (1999). The uncorrected proof copy. Ackerman examines the state of full engagement with one's surroundings or one's abilities, occasionally crossing into her relationship with nature or our estrangement from it. Fine in wrappers, with a few holograph corrections to the text. [#015041] $20
$10
1993. Anderson's dot-matrix printout of a draft of what became the prologue and first chapter of his second novel. 24 pages, with extensive differences between this version and the published version. With a handwritten signed note by Anderson across the top of the first page, saying, in part, that he thinks the novel will be finished in another six weeks. Night Dogs was one of the most eagerly awaited novels of its time, but its publication was delayed as different publishers vied for it but no deal was reached for the publication rights. It was finally published in 1996 by Dennis McMillan, a small press/fine press publisher, primarily of limited editions. Later, in 1998, there was a publication by a major trade publishing house, Bantam, which had merged with Doubleday, the publisher of Anderson's first novel. This is a very early segment of the work-in-progress. Marked by a rusty paper clip, else fine. [#031325] $750
$525
(Anthology)
Browning, Blackfeet Heritage Program/(Browning Public Schools), (1979). A dozen stories from an earlier generation that had survived into the present era, with illustrations by Vernon No Runner. This is possibly a later issue in royal blue stapled wrappers. Near fine. [#025230] $20
$10
(n.p.), Viking, (1993). The uncorrected proof copy of his first novel, which received considerable praise and helped get him selected as one of The New Yorker magazine's "20 best young American writers." Dusty, with a couple corner punctures on the rear cover; very good in wrappers. [#019664] $20
$10
New Rochelle, Elizabeth Press, (1973). The hardcover issue of this collection of verse. Issued in an edition of 400 copies total, only 200 of which were hardcover. Fine without dust jacket, as issued, lacking the publisher's plain card stock slipcase. [#025308] $25
$13
NY, Harper & Row, (1980). Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#912895] $19
$10
NY, Putnam, (1970). Fine in near fine dust jacket and inscribed. [#010426] $20
$10
(KING, Stephen)
Philadelphia, Running Press, (1999). Copy F of 52 lettered copies, of a total edition of 552. Signed photograph of the author (Beahm) tipped to the front flyleaf. Bookplate of another author on the front flyleaf. Fine in a fine dust jacket and lightly rubbed, etched lucite slipcase. "The illustrated guide to the sites and sights that inspired the modern master of horror." [#030351] $250
$163
(NY), Viking, (1998). A review copy. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket with two pages of promotional information laid in. [#911385] SOLD
Frankfurt, Zweitausendeins, 1980, 1982. Three copies of the German editions of these two collaborations between Burroughs and illustrator S. Clay Wilson: one copy each of The Wild Boys and Cities of the Red Night, each signed by Burroughs and Wilson, and one copy of The Wild Boys in a trial binding that was rejected by Wilson, who was displeased with the endpapers, but which is signed by Wilson, with his handwritten explanation: "Trial endpapers not to my liking. They corrected this error for the published edition. I wanted the endpapers to appear as wallpaper reflecting my 'take' on Burroughs' text "I see his face in every flower." Both copies of The Wild Boys have some rubbing to the covers; very good. Slight corner tap to Cities of the Red Night, else fine. All three in cardstock slipcases. [#033129] $1,500
$1,125
(Washington, D.C.), (American Nature Association), 1939. A 3-page article in which Carson argues that starlings, introduced to the U.S. nearly 50 years prior, are more than earning their keep. Eugene Scheiffelin, head of the American Acclimatization Society, introduced two flocks into Central Park, one in 1890 and one in 1891; his motive (not mentioned by Carson) was a desire to import every bird ever mentioned in a work by Shakespeare (starlings had been mentioned once, in Henry IV.) This issue (June-July) is here bound together with the issues for the remainder of 1939, in a hand-lettered university library binding (with "discard" stamp inside the front cover and a circulation pocket at rear). The Carson issue is fine; the binding has a corner bump and is very good. A scarce Carson appearance. [#029061] $275
$179
(Santa Claus)
(1934, 1956, 1968). In 1897, eight year-old Virginia O'Hanlon wrote a letter to the editor of the New York Sun, asking, in part, "Please tell me the truth; is there a Santa Claus?" The reply of Editor Francis P. Church read, in part, "Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus. He exists as certainly as love and generosity and devotion exist, and you know that they abound and give to your life its highest beauty and joy. Alas! how dreary would be the world if there were no Santa Claus! It would be as dreary as if there were no Virginias...." Church's response became the most reprinted English language newspaper editorial in history. After O'Hanlon's death in 1971, the story lived on as an Emmy Award-winning animated television special in 1974; and, in 2009, it became a CGI animated television special entitled simply, "Yes Virginia." The items offered here all predate the story's animation fame, and include the typescript of a 1956 television appearance by O'Hanlon, a Sun broadside of the editorial, and two publications (1934 and 1968). The lot is as follows:
  1. The 3-page typescript of a 1956 segment of the television show The Children's Hour, hosted by Ed Herlihy, with guest appearances in this episode by Santa Claus and by Virginia O'Hanlon, who would have been in her late 60s. In it, Santa asks Herlihy if there really is a Virginia, and Herlihy introduces "Dr. Laura Virginia O'Hanlon Douglas," using her married name (kept after her divorce), acknowledging her doctorate (from her career as an educator), and revealing that "Virginia" was actually her middle name. Herlihy then recounts the story of the editorial, and O'Hanlon is given unscripted time to talk about events since, followed with her own reading of Church's famous response to her younger self. These pages are stapled to:
  2. An undated New York World Telegram/The Sun broadside of the full editorial, entitled "Is There a Santa Claus?," and adding a paragraph at the bottom on "How [the] Editorial Happened to Be Written."
  3. A cover letter is included, written on New York World Telegram letterhead and dated October 21, 1956, from a former employee of the paper to "Miss Clements" (Alice Clements, producer of The Children's Hour), saying that he is acquainted with O'Hanlon and feels he can convince her to appear on the show, adding, "Each and every year during the month of December I was shocked by the nation-wide demand for reprints of the Virginia O'Hanlon story." These three items are folded in half, and the corner staple is rusted; they are otherwise near fine.
  4. Is There a Santa Claus? [Grosset & Dunlap, 1934], a book printing the letter and response, as well as a 45 year-old O'Hanlon's message to the children of "today," asking them to believe, in much the same way as "Peter Pan once asked us to show our belief in fairies." Bookplate and owner initials, else near fine in a very good dust jacket.
  5. Two Christmas Classics, issued by Columbia University Press, ca. 1968, and printing both Church's editorial and Clement Clarke Moore's A Visit from Saint Nicholas ("Twas the night before Christmas") as a holiday keepsake, as both Church and Moore were graduates of Columbia College, and O'Hanlon had received her Masters Degree from Columbia. Approximately 4-3/4" x 6-1/2", edge-sunning to the front cover; near fine in stapled wrappers, with a holiday greeting laid in that is signed by Carl B. Hansen, of Columbia University Press.
A relatively early grouping of items in the enduring legacy of one child's curiosity and Church's timeless response embodying the meaning of Christmas. [#032276] $2,000
$1,500
(NY), (Grove Press), (2000). Second printing of the Grove reissue of Clark's classic 1971 book of photographs of the underbelly of the small, mid-American city where Clark was born, with an emphasis on the youth subculture of drugs and guns. Signed by Clark. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#026959] $400
$260
NY, Norton, (2001). The uncorrected proof copy. Fine in wrappers. [#916136] $19
$10
NY, Harper & Brothers, (1956). Bound galleys of Eastlake's first book, the first novel in what became (with The Bronc People and Portrait of an Artist with Twenty-Six Horses) his Bowman Family Trilogy. This copy was sent to Paul Bowles: a letter laid in from an editor at Harper's announces the book and solicits comments from Bowles. 6-1/2" x 11-7/16", printed on rectos only and perfectbound in plain wrappers with a label partially removed from the front cover. In a custom clamshell case. A very near fine copy of a scarce proof, dating from an era in which the production of bound proof copies was the exception, not the norm: this is the only copy we've ever seen. With notable provenance, having come from Paul Bowles's library, and with textual differences from the published book. [#016192] $1,500
$1,125
NY, Carol Southern, (1993). Epel interviews 26 writers about their dreams. Writers include: Amy Tan, Richard Ford, Isabel Allende, Stephen King, Anne Rice, William Styron, John Nichols, Bharati Mukhertje, John Barth, John Sayles, Maya Angelou, Elmore Leonard, Robert Stone, Maurice Sendak, Reynolds Price, Spalding Gray, Reynolds Price, Art Spiegelman, and others. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#914929] SOLD
NY, Harper & Row, (1968). A second printing of his first book, "a fictional memoir" and one of the defining books of the Sixties, which helped blur the line between fiction and nonfiction much the way the New Journalism of that era did. A finalist for the National Book Award, winner of both the William Faulkner Foundation Award for best first novel and the Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Foundation Award of the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, for a work that, while not a commercial success, was nonetheless "a considerable literary achievement." Made into a movie in 1972, which was a finalist for the Golden Palm award at the Cannes Film Festival. While Exley's book was not a bestseller at the time, over the years it has remained in print, been brought out in a number of different editions, and is widely viewed as a classic of the 1960s. Signed by the author. Very slight spine slant; near fine in a near fine dust jacket with a couple short tears at the crown. [#023413] $850
$595
London, Fortune Press, (1967). A volume of poetry by this Gloucester, MA, poet who was a longtime friend and sometime rival of poet Charles Olson, who directed a critical part of The Maximus Poems at Ferrini. Ferrini's response was a 30-page love poem, which was published as In the Arriving and which Olson later said was Ferrini's best book. Despite a rivalry that has been characterized as "brotherly," they remained close friends throughout Olson's life. Inscribed by the author: "____/ the heart of the book/ Vincent." The recipient's name was deliberately abraded by the recipient. Fine in a near fine, modestly edgeworn dust jacket. [#016201] $350
$228
Boston/NY, Houghton Mifflin, 1998. Tapebound advance copy, consisting of 8 1/2" x 11" sheets reproducing word-processed typescript; a very early state of the book. Fine. Laid in is a typed letter signed by the author. [#008119] $25
$13
NY, Doubleday, (2000). The advance reading copy of this novel by a writer who won the 1996 Southern Book Critics Circle Award. Fine in wrappers. [#019477] $20
$10
(Princeton), (Princeton University Library Chronicle), (1974). An offprint from the Chronicle; reportedly fewer than fifty copies printed for the author's use. Signed by Fowles. A scarce Fowles "A" item. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#006704] $350
$228
NY, Doubleday, (1974). Her first book, a novel for young adults about a young boy coming of age on an Idaho reservation. Hale grew up on the Yakima and Coeur d'Alene reservations. Her memoir, Bloodlines, received the American Book Award. Slight discoloration at inner hinges from binder's glue; near fine in a very near fine dust jacket with trace wear at the crown. An uncommon book, which seems to have been targeted primarily at libraries, so that copies that are not ex-library seldom show up. [#025511] $25
$13
NY, Macmillan, (1963). A play, with a 58-page autobiographical preface. Inscribed by the author in the year of publication: "For Bill Sloane,/ colleague at Bread Loaf -/ with good wishes." William Sloane was a longtime faculty member at the Bread Loaf writers' conference. After his death, a Bread Loaf Fellowship was instituted in his name. Faint foxing to top edge; else fine in a lightly spine-faded dust jacket with a couple small corner chips; still about near fine. [#016252] $175
$114
NY, Dutton, (1978). The second issue of the uncorrected proof copy, in tall green wrappers. Erasures and label removal shadow on the front cover; small label affixed to spine; near fine. Not as scarce as the mustard-colored proof, but many times scarcer than the white advance reading copy. [#032782] $1,000
$700
Boston, Twayne, (1981). One of the dedication copies of this critical study of Jones's fiction. Inscribed by Giles to Jones's widow, Gloria, and their children, Kaylie and Jamie: "In the hope that this reveals my respect and admiration for Jim and my affection for you." The book is dedicated to "Three Beautiful People: Wanda, Morgan, and Kaylie." Kaylie Jones is mentioned in Giles's Acknowledgments for her "rare kind of courage in talking about her father and taking me to places on the Island that evoked him because they had been special to him. She also took me to James Jones's grave." From the library of Peter Matthiessen; Jones and Matthiessen were friends, and lived nearby each other in eastern Long Island. Boards foxed; a very good copy, without dust jacket, presumably as issued. [#032297] $250
$163
NY, Knopf, 1996. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#916345] $19
$10
London, Hodder & Stoughton, (1992). The first British edition. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#914528] $19
$10
NY, High Risk, (1994). Three page corners turned (production flaw); else fine in self-wrappers. [#913155] $19
$10
Garden City, Doubleday, 1975. A later printing of his second novel, with the Q41 code on page 439. Inscribed by King in 1980 to the horror writer Stanley Wiater: "For Stanley - With good wishes and much respect. Keep writing; you're good, and will crack through. Best, Stephen King 11/1/80." Earlier in the year King had picked a story by Wiater as the winner of a Boston Phoenix short story contest (see below). As a writer, editor, interviewer and anthologist, Wiater has won the Horror Writers of America's Bram Stoker Award three times. Wiater's Gahan Wilson-designed bookplate on the front pastedown, the only bookplate Wilson ever designed; foxing to edges of text block; near fine in a very good, third issue ($7.95, "Father Callahan") dust jacket with shallow wear to the spine extremities. A nice association copy of an early edition of an early King novel. [#028936] $2,500
$1,875
Kansas City, Andrews and McMeel, (1995). A presentation copy of the limited revised edition. "PC" on the colophon, which is signed by Beahm and four others: Stephen Spignesi, David Lowell, Michael Collings, and Kenny Ray Linkous. With a typed note from Beahm to recipient laid in. Bookplate of recipient front flyleaf. Fine, without dust jacket, as issued; lacking slipcase. [#030350] $200
$130
Boston, Houghton Mifflin, (1993). The first American edition of the second novel by this Cherokee author who has lived in Canada for a number of years. This book was nominated for Canada's most prestigious literary award, the Governor General's Award. Fine in a mildly spine-faded, else fine dust jacket. [#914199] $19
$10
Garden City, Doubleday, 1980. One of the dedication copies of this pseudonymous work by the horror/thriller master. Inscribed by Koontz to Mary Ann Prencevic, one of the dedicatees: To Mary Ann, if you'll look ahead to the dedication page, you'll see that my pleasure in having you for a friend is set in cold type for everyone to see. Love, Brian Coffey alias Dean R. Koontz." Koontz is now one of the best-known and best-selling horror and thriller writers after Stephen King, but in 1980 he was much less well-known and had published most of his previous works only in paperback, many of them pseudonymously. This is a relatively early hardcover from Koontz, dating from before the days of his fame and celebrity. Small repaired scuff on the rear pastedown, lower corner bump; near fine in a near fine dust jacket with light wear to the spine extremities. Scarce: dedication copies seldom turn up on the market, especially by so popular an author as Koontz. [#032795] $1,500
$1,125
NY, Scientia-Factum, 1968. Kosinski's resume from 1970, the facts of which roughly correspond to to the biographical sketch at the rear of The Art of the Self, with the omission of his 1965 work Notes of the Author. Together with a copy of The Art of Self [NY, Scientia-Factum, 1968], a pamphlet containing short pieces relating to his National Book Award-winning novel Steps. Inscribed by the author. The pamphlet is edge-sunned; near fine in stapled wrappers. The resume is folded in thirds; edge-sunned with a small edge chip; near fine. A unique combination of items pertaining to Kosinski's writing career after the success of The Painted Bird and before the scandals that later plagued him after his celebrity, culminating in his suicide. [#022972] $750
$525
London, Bodley Head, (1960). The first British edition of the author's first book, a pseudonymously published nonfiction account of Russia in the postwar years, predating his first novel, The Painted Bird, by five years. Inscribed by the author as "Jerzy Kosinski" for Hugh Moorhead in 1982. Moorhead was a Philosophy professor at Northeastern Illinois University who wrote to 250 authors to ask them what they thought the meaning of life was, and then published their answers in a depressing book that suggested nobody had much of a clue. Stripe at bottom page edges; very good in a very good dust jacket chipped at the upper front spine fold. [#000989] $375
$244
Holyoke, Crossroads Press, (1992). A story by Lansdale, published as a limited edition with an introduction by the author and nine illustrations for it by nine different artists. This is a super-limited edition: supposedly issued in an edition of 500 numbered copies that were signed by the author alone, this is copy "A-23/23" and is not only signed by Lansdale but also signed by the eight artists: S. Clay Wilson, Elman Brown, A.C. Farley, Mark Masztal, Mark Nelson, Timothy Truman, and Michael Zulli. Stamp of another author inside the front cover; fine in stapled wrappers. An extremely rare edition of one of Lansdale's early stories, with the title character imaged by a group of well-respected fantasy artists, and signed by all. [#031423] $375
$244
(Oakland), Cloud Marauder, 1976. Second, expanded edition of his first book, originally published in 1963. Only issued in wrappers. Signed by the author in full on the title page and inscribed to Peter [Matthiessen] on the half title: "For Peter who has been everywhere -- Here is a book that goes nowhere. Love, Phil." Mildly foxed and faded; very good in wrappers. [#032493] $650
$455
[Paris], Stock, (1962). First thus, a French edition of Matthiessen's fourth book, third novel. Unmarked, but from the library of Peter Matthiessen. Abrasions to front cover; very good in wrappers. [#032037] $20
$10
(Denville), (Buddhist Ray), (1993). Unmarked, but from the library of Peter Matthiessen. Near fine. [#032078] $20
$10
NY, Viking, (1978). A second printing of his first National Book Award winner, which recounts a trip to the Himalayas with naturalist George Schaller in the hopes both of encountering a snow leopard in the wild and of coming to terms with his wife's recent death from cancer. From Matthiessen's own library and with more than a dozen passages marked in pen by Matthiessen, all having to do with the porter and camp assistant Tuktken. There are a couple of other passages marked in pencil, with page notations in the prelims. Rear flyleaf excised, else a very good copy, lacking the dust jacket. [#032371] $750
$525
NY, Macmillan, 1994. An advance copy, in the form of velobound typeset pages. With Matthiessen's markings, underlinings and a couple of his notes in the text. Matthiessen provided a jacket blurb for the finished book, and the markings indicate a close and thorough reading of the text. Cover stained; velobinding detaching. Very good. [#032423] $200
$130
(Thomaston), (Northwoods), (1984). Inscribed by the author to Peter [Matthiessen] in 1994: "Here's why I gave up on poems and cast my lot with fiction." Fine in wrappers. [#032102] $50
$25
(n.p.), Viking, (1992). The advance reading copy of the third book by this bestselling African-American author. Fine in wrappers. [#020421] $20
$10
(McSweeney's Quarterly Concern)
(n.p.), McSweeney's, (2001). The sixth issue. Hardcover, issued with a CD by They Might Be Giants. Published in two variant bindings, this being the one reading "We Now Know Who" (the other read "Find Them and Convince Them"). With an initialed ink and crayon drawing of a strawberry, by Dave Eggers, on the first blank. Fine, without dust jacket, as issued. [#032953] $350
$228
Undated. A color photograph of Eve, Miller's fourth wife. Eve is creating an Oriental mudra with her hands, in front of a mosaic of the same design, which is surrounded by various symbols, some appearing to be Sanskrit. The photo, 4-1/4" x 4-3/4", is fine. Previously mounted into a photography studio folder behind a mat on which Eve's name is written (in Miller's hand?). These elements are present, but detached. [#012923] SOLD
(Native American Periodical)
(NY), (AIRORF), 1994. Volume 1, No. 1. Newsletter of a nonprofit foundation established to aid in the process of repatriation of Native American cultural artifacts -- an important movement in recent Native American tribal histories. Folded for mailing; else fine. [#018281] $20
$10
(London), Flamingo, (1991). A British reprint edition. Fine in wrappers. [#010714] $20
$10
NY, Putnam's, (1977). A working copy of the uncorrected proof, with more than a half dozen of Plimpton's photocopied inserts stapled to existing pages, notations where the inserts occur, and a renumbering of chapters after Chapter 17 is broken in two. "Zeroxes [sic] of Plimpton corrections attached" written on front cover. Handling apparent to covers; reading creases to spine; very good in wrappers. An interesting glimpse of both the work-in-progress and the publication methodology of the 1970s: an artifact of a now long-gone era. [#031745] $500
$325
(n.p.), (n.p.), 1961/1962. Mimeographed typescripts of two one-act plays, which were collected in his 1962 volume entitled Children is All. Inscribed by Purdy on the title page of Cracks to the poet Quentin Stevenson "with the sincere admiration of James" and additionally signed, James Purdy. Children is All (1961) runs 41 pages; Cracks (1962) runs 16 pages. Each is near fine; stapled in the upper left corner. Purdy was a controversial author whose works explored, among other things, gay themes at a time when this was taboo; his popularity and critical reception suffered as a result, but many of his more celebrated contemporaries considered him a genius and a great writer, among them being Tennessee Williams (who wrote a blurb for the book publication of Children is All); Edward Albee (who produced Purdy's play Malcolm); and Gore Vidal, who called him "an authentic American genius" and wrote in the New York Times article entitled "James Purdy: The Novelist as Outlaw" that "Some writers do not gain wide acceptance because their work is genuinely disturbing. Purdy is one of them." As best we can determine, OCLC lists only two copies of the former typescript and one of the latter in institutional collections. Another collection lists "photocopies" of these two plays, but these productions predate plain paper photocopying. Scarce works by a writer whom Jonathan Franzen called "one of the most undervalued and underread writers in America." [#031486] $1,500
$1,125
(Saint Paul), Graywolf, (1988). A collection of short fiction by a writer who is now best-known for his writings in science and natural history, including Song of the Dodo, which won a John Burroughs Medal, and Spillover, which tracked contagious diseases that pass from animals to humans. Warmly inscribed by the author to Peter [Matthiessen]. Near fine in wrappers. [#032517] $350
$228
(NY), Viking, (1990). Owner signature on front flyleaf; else fine in a fine dust jacket. [#916736] $19
$10
Garden City, Doubleday Doran, 1936. A novel by the prolific British author of the classic Fu Manchu series of fantasy novels, which were immortalized in a series of films, first in the 1930s and then again in the 1960s. Inscribed by Rohmer, "with love," and signed with his trademark "$ax." Bookplate front pastedown; spine-sunned; handling to boards; very good in a very good, modestly edgeworn dust jacket with a dusty rear panel. Books signed by Rohmer are uncommon these days, especially in collectible condition and in dust jacket. [#021689] $1,250
$938
NY, Farrar Straus, (2000). Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#916879] $19
$10
NY, World Publishing, (1970). "The Natural History of Animals in Danger of Extinction." Fine in a near fine dust jacket and original cardboard slipcase, which is inscribed by Terry Southern to Peter Matthiessen: "Dear Pete - Spotted this tome en passant so to speak, and thought 'what the heck, that looks very much like the great Math's bag!', so I snapped one up (that's the kind of guy I am, Pete, just snapped it right up) and am sending it along in hopes you may groove on it. Some boss-pix. Best, yr. T." A fine Terry Southern letter on a cardboard slipcase of a gift, and an indication of the friendship between the two, which is not as widely known as some of Matthiessen's other literary friendships. [#032531] $1,250
$938
Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1967. His first book, a novel of drifters in New Orleans in the early Sixties caught up in the web of a quasi-religious political machine. Winner of the William Faulkner Award for best first novel of the year as well as a Houghton Mifflin Literary Fellowship Award. Inscribed by the author. Near fine in a very good, lightly foxed dust jacket with a creased tear to the lower rear panel. Basis for the film WUSA (the call letters of the right-wing radio station that figures prominently in the book), starring Paul Newman, Joanne Woodward and Anthony Perkins. [#031505] $950
$665
Boston, Houghton Mifflin, (1976). The Book of the Month Club edition. Signed by the author. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with one small edge tear. [#000637] $20
$10
Chapel Hill, Algonquin Books, 1996. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#916906] $19
$10
(NY), (New York Quarterly), (1973). An issue of the magazine, printing Updike's poem for the first time and made into a limited edition by means of a rubber-stamp. Of a total edition of 483 copies, this is copy number 334 of 457 numbered copies signed by Updike at his contribution. Fine in wrappers. [#030279] $50
$25
NY, Norton, (2002). The advance reading copy. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#916974] $19
$10
(NY), HarperCollins, (1996). Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#916984] $19
$10
Arlington Hts, Dark Harvest, 1991. A Publisher's Copy ("PC") of 400 copies signed by the author and by Phil Parks. Fine in a fine dust jacket and slipcase. [#031168] $250
$163
NY, Simon & Schuster, (1969). His first book, a novel. Inscribed by the author to noted author John Hopkins in the year of publication. Mild foxing to endpages and page edges; near fine in a dust jacket with a corner creased on the front flap, else fine. [#026176] $125
$81
(NY), HarperCollins, (1993). The advance reading copy. Fine in wrappers. [#913513] $19
$10
NY, Harcourt Brace, (1923). The first American edition. Owner name on flyleaf; stray pen mark rear cover; some abrasion to spine label; modest general handling. About near fine, lacking the dust jacket. [#017634] $300
$195
NY, Harcourt Brace, 1921. The first American edition of this early collection of short fiction, in which Woolf explores the stream of consciousness technique that she used to great effect in later novels. One of only 1500 copies, this copy in the black cloth binding. Slight foxing to cloth; near fine in a very near fine, price-clipped dust jacket, professionally, preemptively strengthened on the verso along the folds. A beautiful copy; easily the most attractive one we've seen. [#023688] $2,500
$1,875
For notifications of our sale lists, new arrivals, new catalogs, or other e-lists, subscribe to our email list:
*:
:
:

Note: Your email will not be shared and will only be used for Lopezbooks.com announcements.

New Arrivals: Jerome Rothenberg Catalog 170