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Note: Sale prices are net prices -- no further discounts apply.

All books are first printings of first editions or first American editions unless otherwise noted.

London, Hamish Hamilton, (1989). The first British edition, in a jacket price-clipped for Canada. Ackroyd's novel Chatterton was shortlisted for the Booker Prize, and his earlier novel Hawksmoor won the Whitbread Prize and the Guardian Fiction award. Inscribed by the author in London in 1996. Fine in a fine (price-clipped) dust jacket. [#022272] SOLD
NY, Norton, (1973). Second printing of the author's first book, a crime novel that was made into the highly regarded film Straight Time. Bunker was a career criminal, who wrote this book while in prison. After getting out, he had a hand in writing the screenplay for the movie, which Dustin Hoffman had purchased the rights to, and he even got a small part in the film. He went on to write a number of novels and scripts, and to maintain a career as an actor. After 1975, he never went back to prison. This copy is inscribed by the author to the novelist Kent Anderson -- "Congratulations and good luck." A nice association copy: Anderson was a decorated Vietnam vet who became a novelist and later a Portland, Oregon, cop, which became the basis for one of his books. Bunker's gritty, realistic crime novels set a standard for crime fiction that Anderson would have been cognizant of as a writer. Fine in a near fine, spine-sunned dust jacket with one short edge tear and a scuff near the crown. Signed copies of Bunker's first novel are extremely scarce. [#030696] $450
$293
Port Townsend, Copper Canyon Press, (1976). The first book, a collection of poems, by this writer who is an enrolled member of the Eastern Band of the Cherokee tribe. This book won the Washington State Governor's First Book Award in 1976. Inscribed by the author to another Native American poet in 1977, "with great respect for your writing, your support of newer poets, and your inspiration as a Keeper of Tradition." Recipient's handmade bookplate on flyleaf; near fine in wrappers. [#025385] $80
$40
NY, Holt Rinehart Winston, (1973). Inscribed by Carpenter to Peter [Matthiessen] in 1981. Mottling to boards; very good in a very good dust jacket. [#031845] $80
$40
(n.p.), Delacorte, (1976). Carter's most famous book, which its publisher originally identified as "a true story" while it identified the author as a "part-blood Cherokee who is Storyteller in Council to the Cherokee Nations." A dozen years after its initial publication, The Education of Little Tree was chosen by independent booksellers as the book they most liked to sell and it became a word-of-mouth bestseller in a paperback edition published by the University of New Mexico Press. Later, Carter was discovered to be a white man from Alabama who had worked for right-wing politician George Wallace, writing racist propaganda. Carter may have written racist tracts for George Wallace, but in The Education of Little Tree he endorsed humanist values of a high order, which he ascribed to Native American traditions -- respect for the land and one's family, honoring one's elders, promoting generosity and good faith, abhorring hypocrisy and brutality. Even as fiction, The Education of Little Tree raises serious and difficult questions, but it has been taken by many as strongly promoting a healthy sensitivity to, and respect for, Native American traditions and perspectives. In some circles, the question of the book's authenticity is today less of an issue than that of its sentimentality. Bound in the cheap "perfectbound" style, with the pages glued to the spine rather than sewn in signatures. Such bindings have proven extremely fragile over the years, which helps explain the scarcity of relatively recent titles such as this one. Spine lean; spotting to page edges; near fine in a near fine, price-clipped dust jacket with modest edge wear. [#013556] $125
$81
NY, Simon & Schuster, (1974). The uncorrected proof copy. Inscribed by the author. Fine in tall wrappers. [#031233] SOLD
NY, Delacorte Press, (2011). The sixteenth novel in the bestselling series of thrillers featuring Jack Reacher. This book is the "prequel" to the series, explaining parts of Reacher's past only alluded to in the other books. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket with a small "signed copy" sticker on the front panel. [#029064] SOLD
London, Secker & Warburg, (2003). Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#912379] $100
$65
Toronto, Westminster Co., 1899. Owner name and address front flyleaf, fading to the spine and light wear to the extremities; very good in pictorial boards, without dust jacket. [#011407] $20
$10
NY, Doubleday/Talese, (1995). An advance copy in the form of velobound photocopied sheets. Signed by the author. Fine. [#911461] $200
$130
NY, George Braziller, (1978). The hardcover issue. Inscribed by the author to another writer in 1979. Pages foxed; near fine in a near fine dust jacket. Laid in is an autograph note signed by DeFrees, who has replied on the bottom and verso of a note written to her, transmitting a copy of the author's novel. DeFrees replies that she is working on an article on James Wright and offers to be in touch after reading her correspondent's book. The note is creased; near fine. Also laid in is the printed text of the poem "Dominance: A Museum Guide," as delivered at the installation of new members, Phi Beta Kappa, Massachusetts Nu Chapter, May 26, 1984. Folded; staple holes upper corner; near fine. [#022337] $40
$20
Barcelona, Seix Barral, (1973). "Three bourgeois novels" by this Chilean writer, one of which was the basis for Luis Bunuel's classic film The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie, which won an Oscar for Best Foreign Film. Published in the U.S. as Sacred Families: Three Novellas. Donoso is also noted for his critical study of Latin American literature, which both defined and helped create the boom in Latin American literature that brought an entire new pantheon of South American writers into the forefront of world literature. Inscribed by Donoso. Very good in self-wraps. [#013580] $175
$114
January 20, 1980. A short note submitting a story for publication. Slight corner crease, not affecting text; else fine. [#012784] $25
$13
Long Island, Backstreet, (1982). Copy No. 100 of 526 numbered copies of this collection of poems by Ehrhart, Jeptha Evans, and Kraft Rompf. Text block threatening to separate from covers due to drying of glue; near fine in wrappers. [#028628] $25
$13
NY, Pantheon, (1996). Fine in a very near fine, slightly spine-sunned dust jacket. [#913991] $19
$10
London, London Limited Editions, (1985). The limited edition. One of 500 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine in glassine dustwrapper. [#912576] SOLD
NY, Atlantic Monthly, (1997). His first book, a Civil War novel and a publishing phenomenon: after a modest 25,000 copy first printing, the book eventually sold more than a million copies in hardcover and won the National Book Award -- a rare combination of literary and commercial success for any work of fiction, let alone a first novel. Fine in a fine dust jacket, with the John Berendt blurb attached on a label to the front panel (not exactly an issue point, as some copies had this affixed on publication day, while others didn't). Signed by the author in the year of publication. [#915001] $250
$163
NY, Atlantic Monthly, (1997). His first book, a Civil War novel and a publishing phenomenon: after a modest 25,000 copy first printing, the book eventually sold more than a million copies in hardcover and won the National Book Award -- a rare combination of literary and commercial success for any work of fiction, let alone a first novel. Fine in a fine dust jacket, with the John Berendt blurb attached on a label to the front panel (not exactly an issue point, as some copies had this affixed on publication day, while others didn't). Signed by the author in the month of publication. [#915000] $300
$195
NY, Random House, (2006). The limited edition of the second novel by the author of the National Book Award-winning Cold Mountain, which was one of the publishing phenomena of the decade -- a first novel by an unknown young writer that went on to sell over 4 million copies. That helped earn Frazier a reported $8 million+ for this novel, one of the highest dollar figures ever for a literary novel. One of 1600 copies signed by the author. Fine in a fine slipcase. [#912587] SOLD
(Marijuana)
Calcutta, H.C. Gangooly, (1912). Small volume comprising several essays on medicinal and psychoactive plants by an Indian physician. A printed label on the half title reads: "Graciously accepted & Read with interest by H.R.H. The Prince of Wales." Sections on hemp, ganja, hasheesh, and more, all first appearing in Indian Agriculturist. Green cloth binding has some wear and fraying, especially at the extremities; a very good copy and apparently uncommon: OCLC lists only one copy held, that being at the British Library. [#032305] $750
$525
NY, Simon & Schuster, (1952). The first American edition of the South African Nobel Prize winner's first book to be published outside of her native country. A collection of stories. Signed by the author. Small, neat owner name on flyleaf, faint edge-sunning; near fine in a near fine, spine-tanned dust jacket with some internal tape strengthening. An attractive copy of an important first book, and uncommon signed. [#021512] $500
$325
Garden City, Doubleday, 1978. Warmly inscribed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#000158] $25
$13
(n.p.), Well-Defended Press, 1990. A spoof on corporate reports, with contributions by a number of Canadian writers including Kinsella, Ann Knight, Spider Robinson, and others. Kinsella contributes "An excerpt from my essay, Treacherous Snivelling and Other Dangerous Trends in Contemporary U.S. Poetry." Also includes a poem (in Latin) by "Silas Ermineskin," a Kinsella alter-ego and one of the central characters in a number of Kinsella's highly praised Indian stories. Ermineskin's contribution is signed by "Ermineskin," somewhat illegibly. Also signed by Kinsella, Knight, Robinson and five others, presumably all the contributors, although the use of pseudonyms on the contributions makes it impossible to determine, from internal evidence alone, if this is the case. Folded sheets, with plain card-stock covers: apparently a home-made production by someone with a copier, a laser printer, and the friendship of a number of Canadian literary figures. Although the limitation is not stated, and the production methods did not preclude creation of more copies, we are told that there were 30 copies done. 24 pages, folded sheets in cardstock covers. OCLC locates only one copy, in the Canadian national archives. Fine. [#029934] $750
$525
(n.p.), (n.p.), (n.d.). Possibly printed to accompany the Corgi Books edition (London, 1967). Includes a biographical sketch of Kosinski and 9 pages of excerpted comments and reviews, including comments by such notable figures as playwright Arthur Miller, filmmaker Luis Bunuel, Nobel Prize winner Elie Wiesel, and numerous others from Europe and the USA, and particularly France where the book won the prestigious award Le Prix du Meilleur Livre Etranger -- the best book by a foreign writer. An interesting historical view of the reception of this book at around the time of its initial publication. Folded once; some staining and a marginal pen mark to the first page; near fine. [#027939] $50
$25
Austin, Mojo, (1996). Signed by Lansdale. Fine in wrappers. [#031255] SOLD
Boston/NY, Houghton Mifflin, 2010. The advance reading copy of Machart's well-received first novel. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers, with a cover blurb by Tim O'Brien. [#032801] $70
$35
NY, Random House, (1965). Matthiessen's own copies of the first three printings of his fourth novel. Three copies: the first, second, and third printings, each unmarked but from Matthiessen's library. The books show some minor Long Island foxing and are about near fine; the jackets (which are interchangeable) are in only good condition, being highly prized by insects, particularly their spines. [#032340] SOLD
London, Heinemann, (1952). Peter Matthiessen's copy, in which he has re-drafted his included story, "The Centrepiece." Roughly two dozen changes, in the space of ten pages, including a change in the ending. Matthiessen has written, on the flyleaf, "PM story edited in this volume." These changes were incorporated when the story was republished in the collection On the River Styx in 1989. Front hinge cracked, loss of color to spine extremities; a good copy, lacking the dust jacket, but for the front flap, which is laid in. [#032392] $650
$455
(NY), Simon & Schuster, 2002. An advance copy in the form of tapebound photocopied typescript, reproducing the author's corrections. 501 double-spaced pages, printed on both sides. Fine in cardstock covers. [#913323] $175
$114
(McSweeney's Quarterly Concern)
(Reykjavik), McSweeney's, (2001). Nine separate booklets laid into a binding. Flawed copy, with a duplicate Kevin Brockmeir booklet and no J.T. Leroy booklet. Inscribed by Dave Eggers on the rear cover. Also signed by Ann Cummins and by artist Elizabeth Kairys. Near fine (minus the one booklet), and also lacking the publisher's rubber band. [#032956] $100
$65
NY, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, (1981). His third book, first novel, which was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction. Fine in a near fine dust jacket bumped at the spine base. [#008227] $20
$10
(Seattle), (A. Wilbur Stevens), 1944. Miller contributes "Day in the Park," a fragment from Air-Conditioned Nightmare. "Sample Copy" stamped on rear cover and written in pencil on front cover; fine in stapled wrappers. [#017208] $50
$25
Alhambra, Museum Reproductions, (n.d.). Eight unused postcards, each reproducing a Miller watercolor from the 40s or 50s, and each signed by Miller on the verso. The paintings included are: "Val's Birthday Gift," "Deux Jeunes Filles," "Marine Fantasy," "Banjo Self-Portrait," "A Bridge Somewhere," "Girl with Bird," "The Ancestor," and "The Hat and the Man." Previously framed, the frames darkened the back of the cards, but the signatures were protected. The lot is near fine. [#027431] $1,200
$900
London, Rider and Company, (1972). The first British edition of the second book by this non-Native Jungian psychologist, a "poetic and psychological study of the Navajo emergence myth." Small abrasion front flyleaf and erasure first blank; else fine in a very good, price-clipped dust jacket with a diagonal tear at the upper front spine fold. [#025631] $20
$10
Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh Press, (1993). His first book, a collection of short stories that won the Drue Heinz Literature Prize, which was selected that year by Tobias Wolff. Three years later Wolff was one of the judges for Granta magazine in selecting the "20 Best Young American Authors," and O'Nan was among those selected. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#030017] $125
$81
1993. A typed letter signed by Ouellette to a friend and fellow writer, mentioning another screenplay he is working on based on an H.P. Lovecraft story -- which apparently never went into production -- and appending a printout of his four-page short story "The Fourth Witch," which appears to remain unpublished. Edge-creased, folded in thirds for mailing; near fine, with envelope included. [#031476] $250
$163
NY, Atlantic Monthly, (2000). A humorous epistolary mystery about a missing pet-problem advice columnist. Illustrated by New Yorker cartoonist Edward Koren. Inscribed by Plimpton to the author Robert Stone and his wife: "For the Stones/ very best to you both/ George." A good literary association. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#028508] $150
$98
Philadelphia, Lippincott, (1966). Pynchon's second novel, winner of the Rosenthal Award from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, and the most overtly political, and paranoid, of Pynchon's novels. Chosen by David Pringle as one of the hundred best novels of Modern Fantasy. Edge-sunning to boards; near fine in a very near fine, price-clipped dust jacket. [#915473] $675
$473
Normal, Dalkey Archive Press, (1994). "Critical Takes on Pynchon's Novel," edited by Donald Greiner, Geoffrey Green and Larry McCaffrey. This is the simultaneous issue in wrappers. Fine. [#915495] $175
$114
(Anthology)
NY, Random House, (1973). The uncorrected proof copy, inscribed by George Quasha. Light dust soiling; else fine in wrappers. [#001208] $25
$13
(RBS Gazette)
NY, Komar & Melamid, 2001. The first issue of the satirical newspaper "published every 55 days by the Rubber Band Society" and the brainchild of conceptual artists Vitaly Komar and Alexander Melamid, with inspiration from Maira Kalman. Sold at the McSweeney's Store, and with work by Alex Melamid, Amy Fusselman, Ian Frazier, Lawrence Weschler, Jamaica Kincaid, Art Spiegelman, and others. The lead headline is "10,000 Dead at Heraclea" and recounts King Pyrrhus' invasion of Italy in 280 B.C. Tabloid, folded, fine, with publisher's envelope. Scarce; it is unknown whether there were any additional issues. [#032995] $200
$130
(Lewisburg), Press of Appletree Alley, 1995. A fine press limited edition of a story that first appeared in The Partisan Review in 1986. One of 195 numbered copies, signed by the author. An uncommon edition: although the stated limitation was 195, the press was selling unbound copies a couple of years after the initial publication date, suggesting that not all of the sets of sheets were bound. Fine in quarter leather, burgundy cloth boards, in a fine slipcase. The nicest edition done of one of Roth's works. [#911247] $950
$665
NY, Holt, (1996). Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#916876] $19
$10
Boston, Houghton Mifflin, (1974). His second novel, winner of the National Book Award and one of the best novels to link the impact of the Vietnam war on American society in the Sixties to the dark side of that era -- the official corruption and the underside of the drug experiences of a generation. Made into the well-received movie, Who'll Stop the Rain? Near fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#032583] SOLD
Cambridge, Halty Ferguson, 1976. Of a total edition of 276 copies, this is copy number 16 of 250 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. This copy is also inscribed by Updike -- he has personalized the signature on the colophon in a different color ink -- and it includes a brief signed note by Updike on the prospectus, with a hand-addressed mailing envelope. By all appearances, Updike informed the collector of the existence of this edition by sending him a prospectus with a note saying "I thought you should be aware of this" and then the collector ordered the book and Updike personalized the signature for him. A mini-footnote to the relatively early years of Updike's being a highly collected author with numerous signed limited editions to his credit, with a glimpse of Updike's active involvement in helping a collector build his collection. [#031523] $500
$325
(Hopewell), Ecco Press, (1999). The first American edition of Marshall's 1902 golfing classic, published here with a ten-page introduction by Updike. This copy is inscribed by Updike: "For ___ ___/ wife of a great golfer/ Best, John Updike." Laid in is a notecard addressed to the "great golfer" in Updike's hand. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#030290] $250
$163
NY, Theia/Hyperion, (2002). Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#913730] $19
$10
NY, Harcourt, Brace, (1953). The memoirs of this director of more than fifty films, among them Northwest Passage, Billy the Kid, An American Romance, La Boheme, The Champ, Wedding Night, The Texas Rangers, The Citadel, Duel in the Sun and The Fountainhead. Inscribed by Vidor. The boards show wear at the corners; a near fine copy in a very good, rubbed dust jacket with several very small edge chips. With 16 pages of photographs. [#015759] $300
$195
London, Jonathan Cape, (1997). The advance reading copy of the first British edition. Fine in wrappers. [#011047] $50
$25
NY, Knopf, 1997. The advance reading copy of the first American edition of the third volume in White's autobiographical trilogy. One light corner bump; else fine in wrappers. [#008351] $20
$10
NY, Harcourt Brace, 1921. The first American edition of this early collection of short fiction, in which Woolf explores the stream of consciousness technique that she used to great effect in later novels. One of only 1500 copies, this copy in the black cloth binding. Slight foxing to cloth; near fine in a very near fine, price-clipped dust jacket, professionally, preemptively strengthened on the verso along the folds. A beautiful copy; easily the most attractive one we've seen. [#023688] $2,500
$1,875
(n.p.), Dreamworks, 2007. The shooting script for the film version of Yates's first novel: the book was published in 1961; the movie was released in 2008. This is a May 3rd shooting script with revisions for May 11 and May 16. "Revised" sticker on front. Pink and blue bradbound pages; near fine. The script was nominated for a BAFTA Award for best adapted screenplay; Haythe's first novel, The Honeymoon, was nominated for the 2004 Booker Prize. [#029373] $500
$325
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