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Note: Sale prices are net prices -- no further discounts apply.

All books are first printings of first editions or first American editions unless otherwise noted.

(Sixties)
click for a larger image of item #35565, Be Here Now (San Cristobal), (Lama Foundation), (1975). A later printing of Alpert's enormously popular autobiography and guidebook to enlightenment, first published in 1970 in a different form in an edition of 300 copies under the title From Bindu to Ojas. While others before Alpert -- notably Aldous Huxley and Alan Watts -- had laid the groundwork for understanding principles of Eastern religions in terms familiar to Westerners and also describing the psychedelic drug experience in the terms of mystical religious experience, Alpert's book was a bestseller, being reprinted numerous times, selling hundreds of thousands of copies, and fostering what has come to be known as the "New Age" movement. This copy is inscribed "in love" by the author. Laid in is a ticket and program for Ram Dass's "Cultivating the Heart of Compassion" tour, during which this copy was presumably signed, on November 9, 1986. Rubbing and creasing to the covers; dampstaining to the page edges; a good copy in wrappers. [#035565] $750
$525
click for a larger image of item #31324, Defense of Faculty Reviews 1992. A 7-page dot-matrix print-out of a letter by Anderson defending himself against a series of complaints made against him as a faculty member at Boise State University. Together with an unsigned cover letter from 1993 expressing, among other things, a wish he could publish the letter and a tirade against "the new thing, the E-mail," and its allowing people to hide behind a curtain like the Wizard of Oz. Also together with four of Anderson's reviews as a faculty member, three of which have Anderson's holograph annotations (e.g., "don't know how she got this guy in her pocket"). And also together with, and paper-clipped to his faculty reviews, the Pablo Neruda poem "Guilty," on which Anderson has written: "I make my 'Creative Writing' students memorize this for their mid-term." Not signed on the preceding items, but with a 1993 letter of transmittal signed by Anderson, saying, among other things, that he expects he'll be in Boise a few more years "before [they] manage to get rid of me." Rust from paperclips; otherwise all items fine. [#031324] $450
$293
(Author Autographs)
ca. 1990s. More than 75 author autographs from the 1990s, in multiple fields (fiction, sports, politics). Most take the form of an autograph note signed in response to a request for a signed copy of the author's book. Authors include: Jeff Abbott, David Adler, Lloyd Alexander, Stephen Ambrose, Carol Benjamin, Ira Berkow, Jose Raul Bernardo, Fergus Bordewich, Bobby Bowden, Carol Brightman, Po Bronson, John Gregory Brown, Lorenzo Carcaterra, James Carville, Robert Creamer, Jeanne Dams, Jeffrey Denhart, John Derbyshire, Gerald DiPego, Richard Dooling, Michael Dukakis, Tom Dyja, Carole Epstein, Terence Faherty, Earlene Fowler, Joseph Garber, Elizabeth Gunn, Rick Harsch, Carolyn Hart, Stephen Hunter, Walter Iooss, Alan Isler, Michael A. Kahn, David M. Kennedy, Laurie King, William Kingsolving, Virginia Lanier, Marshall Loeb, Carol Lee Lorenzo, Demetria Martinez, Dennis McMillan, Mark Miano, John Ramsey Miller, Skye Kathleen Moody, Christopher Moore, Marcia Muller, Lyn Nofziger, Jack O’Connell, Bruce Olds, Denise Osborne, Alexandra Ripley, Roger Parloff, Sharon K. Penman, Julie Poll, Shirley Povich, Phil Reed, Christopher Reich, William Relling, Lisa See, Thomas Simpson, Annick Smith, Debra Spark, Dana Stabenow, Domenic Stansberry, Diane Stevens, Doug Swanson, Charles W. Sweeney, Paul Szep, Henry W. Thomas, Megan Whalen Turner, Will Weaver, Russell Weigley, Mark Winegardner, John Wessel, Michael C. White, John Wilson, and John Wooden. There are additional dozen or so letters where a representative replied in place of the author. Most of the mailing envelopes are included. The lot is near fine. [#035801] SOLD
London, Collins, 1968. The uncorrected proof copy of her autobiography. Very good in wrappers [#035702] $45
$23
click for a larger image of item #35341, In Our Time (NY), Dial Press, (1999). A review copy of this "memoir of a revolution" by the author of Against Our Will: Men, Women and Rape. This copy belonged to Karen DeCrow, president of NOW (National Organization for Women) in the 1970s: DeCrow reviewed the book for the Syracuse New Times. Laid in is a typed letter signed from Brownmiller to DeCrow thanking her for the review (belatedly, in 2002), and offering to make her dinner. DeCrow is mentioned in the book (p. 225). A copy of her published review is laid in as well. Fine in a fine dust jacket with 4 pages of publisher's review material, including a Women's Liberation Movement Quiz (the answers to which can be found in the book). As fine an association copy as one could hope for. [#035341] $350
$228
(Nature)
click for a larger image of item #35119, The Rolling Earth Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1912. Burroughs provides an 8-page introduction to this collection of "Outdoor Scenes and Thoughts From the Writings of Walt Whitman," as compiled by Waldo R. Browne. Says Burroughs, in part, "As a poet he did not specialize upon flowers or birds or scenery, or any of the mere prettiness of nature, but he thought of wholes, he tried himself by wholes, he emulated the insouciance, the impartiality, the mass movements of the earth." Trace shelf wear; a very near fine copy in a good dust jacket: chipped at both spine ends and rear corners, and fragile at the folds. Uncommon in the original edition; scarce in any jacket. [#035119] $300
$195
click for a larger image of item #35295, His Monkey Wife Or, Married to a Chimp London, Peter Davies, 1930. His first and most famous novel, describing the marriage between an explorer and his pet chimpanzee. This copy is inscribed by Collier to Welsh author Caradoc Evans, with an autograph letter signed by Collier to Evans tipped in at the front pastedown. The letter, dated December 5, 1930, expresses pleasure in reading his, Evans', book and conveys his own book in return. A copy of Evans' book, Nothing to Pay (Faber, 1930), is included. His Monkey Wife is unjacketed; but for some staining and wear to the front board and a tiny owner name on the front flyleaf, a very good copy, and a nice association. [#035295] $500
$325
click for a larger image of item #29580, Suppose One Were A Fish [Seattle], Incunabla, 2007. The lettered limited edition of this poster, a broadside excerpt from Crowley's 1981 novel Little, Big, issued in conjunction with what was to be the 25th anniversary edition of Crowley's World Fantasy Award-winner, which was not published until 2021. A 24" x 37" poster, with art by Peter Milton, whose haunting drawings, etchings, engravings and prints are to grace the new edition. When Little, Big was first published, Ursula Le Guin famously wrote that "all by itself it calls for a redefinition of fantasy"; Thomas Disch called it "the greatest fantasy novel ever." The literary critic Harold Bloom listed three books by John Crowley, including Little, Big, in his book The Western Canon. Bloom is listed as providing an introduction to the anniversary edition of the novel. One can get a sense, from this poster, of the aesthetic of the anniversary volume. One of 26 lettered copies, this being letter "L," signed by John Crowley, artist Peter Milton, editor John Drummond and book designer John D. Berry. Rolled; else fine. A scarce artifact of a prolonged publishing project and labor of love, associated with one of the best-loved and most highly regarded fantasy novels of all time. [#029580] $750
$525
click for a larger image of item #33260, Selected Stories London, Godine, (1990). The uncorrected proof copy of the first British edition, and the first proof to contain the full complement of all 23 stories: the U.S. proof was intended to be issued with only ten of the stories; was mistakenly issued with the "left out" 13; and then re-issued with the intended 10. Signed by Dubus. Foxing near the spine; near fine in wrappers. [#033260] $250
$163
NY, Norton, (1991). The uncorrected proof copy of his first book, a collection of stories. Signed by the author. Spine-sunned; near fine in wrappers. [#912476] $200
$130
(Tokyo/NY), Japan Publications, (1985). First-hand experience of the wife of a Los Alamos physicist. Inscribed by the author: "To a writer from a non-writer who tried because she had something to say -- to a friend from you-know-when - Fondly, Phyllis." Near fine in a very good dust jacket. [#035806] $50
$25
click for a larger image of item #914963, Communist Derry/Ridgewood, Babcock & Koontz, (1987). Ford's first limited edition and the first and only separate appearance of this story, which was originally published in Esquire and later collected in Rock Springs. Of a total edition of 240 copies, this is copy "IV" of 40 hardcover, Roman-numeraled copies signed by the author. Fine. [#914963] $350
$228
1987. July 20, 1987. Ford writes, presumably to a publisher, declining to offer unspecified praise (review or book blurb) for another writer's book, despite having "some genuine admiration for it" and admitting that "he's a nice writer of sentences." At the same time, Ford gets in a pitch for Richard Bausch's book Spirits. Folded for mailing, else fine. [#912557] $150
$98
(Poetry)
click for a larger image of item #35642, Poeta in Nueva York Mexico, Editorial Seneca, 1940. The most famous poem by the prominent Spanish poet, who was killed by fascists during the Spanish Civil War. This is the first Spanish-language edition, published a few weeks after the bilingual edition done in the U.S., and the first illustrated edition, with four original drawings by the author, two of them printed in color. Two owner names and a comment in the prelims; tape shadows to the endpages; upper and lower edge tears at the front joint. A good copy in wrappers, with less of the darkening and chipping that frequently afflicts the wrappers of this title. [#035642] $750
$525
click for a larger image of item #31393, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time Promotional Items London, Jonathan Cape, 2003. A 4-page promotional flyer (with the McEwan blurb); and a set of five Fickling promotional postcards with Volkswagens of varying colors and featuring either a quote from the book, from the publisher, or from Ian McEwan, Arthur Golden, or Oliver Sacks. Together with two copies of the Fickling jacket, which are near fine; the flyer and the postcards are fine. Uncommon promotional ephemera. [#031393] $80
$40
Sylva, New Native Press, 1985. A broadside poem, printed in an edition of 100 copies. Approximately 9" x 17", now matted to 13-1/2" x 21-1/2". Fine. 3 copies in OCLC. [#035453] $75
$38
NY, Ballantine/Del Rey, (1978). The hardcover issue. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#916291] $150
$98
click for a larger image of item #29930, Verbannte [Exiles] Zurich, Rascher & Cie., 1919. The first German edition of Joyce's play Exiles and the first of his works to be published in translation in any language. One of 600 copies printed: Joyce was living in Zurich at the time and he paid for the publication of this book out of his own pocket. This copy is inscribed by the author: "To J.R. [sic] Watson, Jun / with grateful regards / James Joyce / 8. ix. 1919." J.S. Watson, Jr. was at the time the co-owner of the modernist literary journal The Dial, which he bought from Martyn Johnson with his friend and fellow Harvard graduate, Scofield Thayer. Watson became president of the magazine and Thayer became its editor. The "grateful regards" refers to a gift of $300 that Watson had sent Joyce earlier in the year at the urging of Thayer, who had himself sent Joyce $700. These sums bailed Joyce out of dire financial straits, allowed him to settle a court case against him, and helped him support the theater group that he had associated with in Zurich, the English Players. In 1920 The Dial published a piece by Joyce, and in 1921 Thayer was one of his most ardent and influential supporters in the censorship case in New York against Ulysses and its publication in the Little Review. A notable association copy of Joyce's first translation. Slocum & Cahoon D44. Pages browned and acidified, and covers strengthened at all the edges and spine with tape, with a hole cut in the spine for the title to show through. The first blank, on which the inscription appears, is also strengthened at the edges with tape. Fragile, and a candidate for de-acidification, but a significant association copy from a critical point in Joyce's life and career. [#029930] $10,000
$7,500
NY, Dutton, (1985). Reviews from the mid-1980s: Flashdance, Desperately Seeking Susan, Footloose, Stop Making Sense, The Big Chill, etc. Unmarked, but from the estate of the author. Very faint foxing to the edges of the text block; still fine in a fine dust jacket. [#035357] $40
$20
click for a larger image of item #35647, The Current Cinema NY, The New Yorker, 1968-1988. Kael's own copies of 190 of her "Current Cinema" columns for The New Yorker, which she wrote for over two decades. All but two of these (one from 1968 and one from 1970) date from 1980 forward, after her leave of absence to try her hand in Hollywood. Included here are 20-26 columns for each of the years 1981-1987; 9 from 1980; and 13 from 1988. Several copies of each issue are present, which Kael has clipped together. Kael has also written the date on the majority, which tend to lack a printed date; and approximately a dozen columns bear Kael's corrections, markings or comments, in addition to one or two showing a copy-editor's changes. The first issue present, November 16, 1968, reviewing the forgettable Sean Connery vehicle Shalako, has Kael's note attached, which says, "Ugh." The lot is near fine. [#035647] $2,500
$1,875
click for a larger image of item #28935, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest NY, HBO/Cannon Video, (n.d). The 1975 Academy Award-winning movie based on Kesey's novel, in VHS format. Signed by Kesey on the case, over the picture of Jack Nicholson, who himself won an Academy Award for the lead role. The placement of the signature may have been a statement on Kesey's part: he was known to have strongly opposed the casting of Nicholson as McMurphy (thinking a more physically imposing actor, such as Gene Hackman, would have been more appropriate), and he reportedly considered having his own name taken off the movie in protest. Kesey's son, Zane, said that this was the only copy of the movie he had ever heard of being signed by his father, because of how thoroughly unhappy he was with the film. Fine in a very good, rubbed case, with a small sticker removal abrasion. [#028935] $750
$525
click for a larger image of item #31419, Oregon Trail 1975-2000 Eugene, Bend in the River Council, (1974). An ambitious project conceived by Kesey (as Co-Director) and others to form a Council to address the major problems facing Oregon (and by extension, the U.S.) in a manner which would expose the issues to the public at large and allow for public input. This is a press kit cum prospectus for the council, including numerous separate pieces, e.g. a copy of a letter to Kesey from the Governor, lauding the project; a two-page set of proposals for the creation of the council and its structure and agenda; two issues of The Bend in the River Reality, a broadsheet newspaper, to which Ken Kesey and Ken Babbs, among others, contribute to Issue 1, the "Special Armory Issue," and the same contributions appear in Issue Number 2, the "Special Coast Issue"; there are two magazine-format issues of The BITR Papers, with different color covers and variant content, some of which overlaps with other items in the lot. The intent of the project was to create an educated, informed "Enlightened Constituency" that would "influence not only the state's politicians, the populace and the industry, but the future course of her sister states as well, and thus help steer this nation through the uncharted waters before us." While it may not be attributable to this particular effort, Oregon has become something of a bellwether for the rest of the region and for the country as a whole; one way or another, the project has in many ways largely come to fruition. All housed in a Bend in the River Council folder. Edge-sunned and musty; very good. Rare. [#031419] $550
$385
click for a larger image of item #27232, In Search of Light NY, Exposition Press, (1969). A volume of vanity press poetry by Kelly, distinguished by a front cover blurb by Harper Lee, from a period of time when it was not uncommon for vanity publishers to simply warehouse their print runs for a predetermined length of time and then destroy them, with the majority of copies receiving distribution coming out of the author's allotment. For most vanity press works -- regardless of how many were originally printed -- the number of copies that ever made it into the marketplace probably averages in the low dozens. That fact, combined with the fact that Harper Lee has published so little other than To Kill a Mockingbird, makes this a rare occurrence in print by the author of one of the best-loved American novels of all time. This copy is inscribed by Kelly to Phoebe Lee "with fond best wishes." Kelly was a native of Excel, Alabama, less than 10 miles from Lee's hometown of Monroeville, Alabama. Small spot to front cover; near fine in a mildly rubbed dust jacket with a tear at the upper spine fold. [#027232] $250
$163
(Theater)
click for a larger image of item #35620, The Blue Bird NY, Dodge Publishing, 1911. A six-page photographic calendar (for 1912) depicting scenes from Maeterlinck's "The Blue Bird" (with the added attribution "As I saw it played/Louise Hurlbut Mason.") Photographs by Byron. Ribbon-tied; 14" x 11". The calendar is a 4" x 2" inset accessible from all inner pages. Gift inscription on rear cover; moderate foxing; shallow insect damage to lower edge. Very good. [#035620] $75
$38
Bloomington, Indiana University Press, (1970). The poet's first book. Inscribed by the author to another poet in the year of publication "with love and best wishes, Sandy." Recipient's handmade bookplate on front flyleaf. Near fine, with various portions of the dust jacket clipped and pasted on the boards and endpages. [#022758] $40
$20
click for a larger image of item #34568, "Theme to a Dream: Notes on a Film in Progress" Charlottesville, Blue Ridge Review, 1978. An essay in the combined issue 1 & 2 of The Blue Ridge Review, with an autograph post card signed laid in to Pauline Kael, inviting her to visit him in Charlottesville and wishing her a happy birthday. The essay recounts Minckler's efforts to make a film about the director Claude Jutra, and includes excerpts from the film, including a scene at the end of the film when Jutra cites Kael as one of the only critics he understands, and the film focuses on Kael's portrait on the dust jacket of one of her books, and slowly zooms in, leaving just her eyes. On this page Minckler has written another note to Kael suggesting she might be interested in this scene, and again inviting her to visit. Signed "Love, David." Offsetting to pages from the paperclip holding the postcard in; about near fine in stapled wrappers. A bookmark has Minckler's address, and on the postcard Kael has written "answered." [#034568] $75
$38
(Nature)
click for a larger image of item #35603, Rescue the Earth! Conversations with the Green Crusaders (Toronto), McClelland & Stewart, (1990). The Canadian author of Never Cry Wolf, among many others, here interviews environmental activists including Ron Burchell (The Sierra Club); Monte Hummel (World Wildlife Fund); Stephen Best (International Wildlife Coalition); and others, including David Suzuki, Peter Singer, and Elizabeth May. Inscribed by Mowat in the year of publication. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#035603] $125
$81
(KENNEDY, John F.)
click for a larger image of item #32322, Typed Letter Signed, with Vim and Vigor 1964. Hall of Famer Musial ("Stan the Man") played baseball for the St. Louis Cardinals from 1941 to 1963; in 1964, he began a three-year term as Consultant to the President on Physical Fitness, under Lyndon Johnson. This (form) letter, written on White House stationery, addressed to the Public Relations Director of the L.A. Dodgers, and signed by Musial as "Stan," asks for help, "since we don't have funds for advertising" in publicizing "two new books -- Vim for girls, Vigor for boys -- which explain how important [exercise] can be to their future." Included here are copies of Vim and Vigor, "A Complete Exercise Plan for Girls/Boys 12 to 18." [Washington, D.C.: President's Council on Physical Fitness, 1964]. Each is 24 pages, leading off with a Presidential Message from Johnson and concluding with a message from President Kennedy "prepared especially for this book in November, 1963." The 50+ year old advice is surprisingly current, and the advice across the two genders is surprisingly balanced. The letter is fine; the booklets are very good (Vim) and near fine (Vigor) in stapled wrappers. An example of President Kennedy's foresight in his emphasis on physical fitness, and the subsequent President taking up the mantle to continue his effort with the help of one of the athletic superstars of the day. [#032322] $500
$325
(Politics)
click for a larger image of item #34903, Ollie (n.p.), J. Faraone, 1987. An Oliver North paper doll. Drawn, printed, hand-cut, (i.e. "shredded"), and signed by Jim Faraone, founder of the International Fashion Doll Convention. A political statement, taking aim at National Security Council staff member Oliver North, who, with his secretary Fawn Hall, shredded documents that presumably would have implicated him in the Iran-Contra scandal (the selling of arms to Iran to fund Nicaraguan rebels). A reminder of simpler times in political corruption, when it sufficed to simply hide the truth, as opposed to fabricating new truths and then fighting for them. 8-1/2" x 11". Bottom edge shredded by design; fine. No copies listed in OCLC. [#034903] $200
$130
NY, #Magazine, 1981. Oppenhemier's poetry comprises the entire unnumbered special issue of #Magazine. This copy is inscribed by Oppenheimer to Edward Hoagland: "For Ted/ also progressing/ Joel." A nice association copy: Oppenheminer and Hoagland were friends in the 1960s when they both lived in NY and wrote for The Village Voice, among their other pursuits. Mild edge sunning; else fine in stapled wrappers. [#026364] $80
$40
(Sydney), Picador, (2003). Signed by the author. Slight bump to crown; else fine in self-wrappers. [#912691] $100
$65
(African American)
click for a larger image of item #35564, The Street Boston, Houghton Mifflin, (1991/1992). An advance reading copy of the reissue of her first novel, which won the Houghton Mifflin Literary Award when it was first published in 1946. Copyright date on this edition states 1991, but a publisher's sticker on the front cover states a publication date of "Feb. 12, 1992 (Black History Month)." Fine in wrappers, with a publicity photo of Petry laid in. [#035564] $35
$18
(Publishing)
click for a larger image of item #35044, Amok Press Collection New York, Amok Press, (1987-1989). A complete run of the books published by Adam Parfrey's Amok Press, his first publishing imprint, a transgressive effort intended to provoke readers and critics. Its first publication was the only novel by Joseph Goebbels, Adolph Hitler's propaganda minister. Eight titles, ten volumes, as follows:
  • GOEBBELS, Joseph. Michael. 1987. Goebbels' novel, originally written in 1923 and first published, in German, in 1929. This is the first and only edition in English, although the book had gone through 17 editions in German by the end of World War II. Translated by Joachim Neugroschel. A handful of marginal markings; several small post-it place-holders inserted. Near fine in wrappers. No other copies of this title are listed online.
  • PARFREY, Adam, editor. Apocalypse Culture. 1987. An anthology of short pieces on a number of controversial, even taboo, subjects. Near fine in wrappers. Together with a later printing of the expanded and revised edition, done by Feral House -- Parfrey's second publishing venture (its motto was "Refuses to Be Domesticated") -- which includes a preface by Parfrey that is not in the original edition, and which is signed by Parfrey in 2002. Very good in wrappers.
  • BLACK, Jack. You Can't Win. 1988. First thus. Black's 1926 autobiography, with a new introduction by William Burroughs, who said he first read it in 1926, and used characters and scenes from it in his own work fifty years later. Near fine in wrappers.
  • GORDON, Mel. The Grand Guignol. 1988. Near fine in wrappers. The first history of the Paris "Theatre of Fear and Terror." Heavily illustrated quarto.
  • KEEL, John A. Disneyland of the Gods. 1988. Fine in wrappers. A book on various paranormal and unexplained events and phenomena, by a noted UFOlogist. Blurb by Robert Anton Wilson.
  • REITMAN, Ben L. Boxcar Bertha. 1988. An autobiography, as told to Reitman, originally published in 1937 as Sister of the Road. A rare look at hoboes, anarchists, hopping freight trains, and the underbelly of society from the point of view of a woman. Introduction by Kathy Acker. Near fine in wrappers. Together with the BOMC hardcover edition, which is fine in a near fine dust jacket.
  • SCHRECK, Nikolas, editor. The Manson File. 1988. A compendium of writings, drawings, and photographs by Charles Manson and friends and followers, published 20 years after the Manson murders in Hollywood. With a blurb by Lynette ("Squeaky") Fromme, one of his followers. Near fine in wrappers.
  • BLACK, Bob and PARFREY, Adam, editors. Rants and Incendiary Tracts. 1989. "Voices of Desperate Illumination, 1558-Present." Short pieces by a variety of writers, from Jean Paul Marat to Timothy Leary. Near fine in wrappers.
[#035044] $1,500
$1,125
(Pandemics)
click for a larger image of item #34919, Spillover. Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic NY, Norton, (2012). From Quammen's website, ca. 2012: "The next big and murderous human pandemic ... will be caused by a new disease -- new to humans, anyway. The bug that’s responsible will be strange, unfamiliar, but it won’t come from outer space. Odds are that the killer pathogen -- most likely a virus -- will spill over into humans from a nonhuman animal." Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#034919] $400
$260
(Radical Education Project)
Detroit, Radical Education Project, ca. 1965. Four publications: Dave Gilbert's "Consumption"; Martin Nicolaus' "The Contradiction of Advanced Capitalist Society and Its Resolution"; Andre Gunder Frank's "On the Mechanisms of Imperialism"; and Regis Debray's "The Long March in Latin America." All near fine in stapled wrappers. [#035740] $35
$18
(n.p.), International Collectors Library, 1976. First thus: the International Collectors Library edition. Gold on black hardcover binding. Slight loss of gilt to spine, else fine, without dust jacket, as issued. The date (1976) is the copyright date: possibly issued later. [#035371] $100
$65
click for a larger image of item #35613, Anne Rice's The Queen of the Damned (Wheeling), Innovation, (1991-1993). Ten of the twelve issues (#s 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10 and 11) of Innovation's graphic serialization of the third book in the Vampire Chronicles. All are fine in stapled wrappers. [#035613] $200
$130
click for a larger image of item #29530, Others Ottawa, Borealis, 1972. The first book, a collection of poetry, by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Stone Diaries. Inscribed by Shields to the Canadian poet and novelist Rosemary Aubert: "For Rosemary/ with thanks for a delightful evening/ Carol Shields." Spine faded, with a little tear to the spine base; near fine in wrappers. A nice literary association copy of an important first book. [#029530] $750
$525
NY, Dutton, (1987). A review copy of this collection of poetry. Mild age toning to pages, else fine in a fine dust jacket, with review slip, author photo and promotional pages laid in. [#916868] $100
$65
(NY), Dell, (1973). Inscribed by Solow to Pauline Kael: "To Pauline -- The mother of all us movie lovers -- Marty." A paperback original; near fine. [#034582] $35
$18
(Climate Fiction)
NY, Random House, 1941. Stewart's classic novel of the 12-day development of a cataclysmic storm named "Maria." (The practice of naming storms was reportedly inspired by this novel.) Storm was a bestseller and was picked up by the Book of the Month Club: most copies on the market are Book Club editions, which have blue and white headbands and tailbands and lack the $2.50 price on the dust jacket. This is a later printing (no statement of first edition) of the Random House edition. A book that anticipates the many novels of climate catastrophes that have been written in recent years, this title is still in print 80+ years later, having been re-issued in the NYRB Classics series, with an introduction by Nathaniel Rich. Owner bookplate to half-title. Near fine in a very good dust jacket with light edge wear and a small chip at the spine crown. [#035804] $45
$23
click for a larger image of item #912822, Dog Soldiers Boston, Houghton Mifflin, (1974). The uncorrected proof copy of his second novel, winner of the National Book Award and one of the best novels to link the impact of the Vietnam war on American society in the Sixties to the dark side of that era -- the official corruption and the underside of the drug experiences of a generation. This is the second issue proof, in gold-brown wrappers with a publisher's letter to booksellers reproduced on the front cover. Signed by the author. Shallow creases to three corners; near fine in wrappers. [#912822] $500
$325
NY, Fiction, (1973). An excerpt from a novel-in-progress, which turned out to be Dog Soldiers. A bibliographically significant piece, in that this is the only place where Dog Soldiers is identified by the title Skydiver Devoured by Starving Birds. Signed by Stone. Also includes John Lennon, Donald Barthelme, Jerome Charyn, and others. Tall newsprint journal. Fine. [#914689] $125
$81
click for a larger image of item #32829, Unpublished Typescript about George Orwell and Nineteen Eighty-Four (n.p), (n.p.), [ca. 1983]. In 1983, Robert Stone, National Book Award-winning novelist, was commissioned to write a piece on George Orwell and his dystopian novel Nineteen Eighty-Four, as that calendar year approached. In the piece, Stone made an effort to reclaim Orwell from the conservative right wing, which had taken his most famous, anti-totalitarian novels -- Nineteen Eighty-Four and Animal Farm -- to be explicit condemnations of the Soviet Union and Communism, and by implication all leftist thought itself. Instead, Stone argues that Orwell's writing in Homage to Catalonia -- not to mention his fighting on the Republican side in the Spanish Civil War -- identifies Orwell as someone with both a socialist sympathy and "a certain affinity with what I believe is best about the United States," a kind of Puritanism that is characterized by "rectitude...conscience and common sense." He goes on to point out that Orwell "was the sort of radical who makes enemies on both sides of epic struggles," owing to his "originality and intelligence, [and] above all his thoroughgoing honesty, [which] always got him in trouble. A writer and man more predictable and dull, less infernally scrupulous would have had a better time of it." Stone adds that Orwell was idealistic but non-ideological -- as Stone was himself -- and deeply committed to the kind of "pragmatism that has characterized American moral thinkers from Jefferson to James to Neibuhr." He concludes that "We may never produce a greater political novel than Nineteen Eighty-Four" and that "it has done its work for us" in shaping our fears and cautions sufficiently for us to have avoided the totalitarian dystopia that was latent in the post-War years of the Cold War. The confluence of writer and subject here was, in many ways, a near-perfect one but the piece seems never to have been published; we can find no record of it; a cover letter from Stone's wife, Janice, indicates this was done for Thames Television, but whether it was produced or used remains unknown to us. One of Stone's novels includes an allusion to a critical moment in Nineteen Eighty-Four: Stone's character explains that one has "to look the gray rat in the eye" -- an allusion to the torture by rats that Winston Smith, in Nineteen Eighty-Four, is faced with, which causes him to "break" and betray himself and his loved ones. 18 pages, ribbon copy typescript, with Janice Stone's cover letter, laid into an agent's folder. Fine. An unknown Robert Stone piece, on a subject that touches close to many of the central and pervasive themes of his own writings. Unique. [#032829] $8,500
$6,375
NY, Crime Club/Doubleday, (1991). First American edition. Near fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#035417] $40
$20
click for a larger image of item #34609, Fetal Brain Tango (Northampton), Tundra, 1991. A book of sketches by Totleben, one of the key artists associated with Swamp Thing and the horror anthology Taboo. Published as Number Two in the Tundra Sketchbook Series, the press that was an offshoot of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle phenomenon. Fine in wrappers. [#034609] $75
$38
(Literary Exile)
click for a larger image of item #35585, Literary Exile in the Twentieth Century NY, Greenwood Press, (1991). An 850+ page biographical dictionary of exiled writers, including a section discussing groups as a whole, such as "Gay and Lesbian Writers in Exile," "Iranian Writers in Exile," "Francophone African...," "Romanian..." etc. Trace foxing to top edge, else fine, without dust jacket, as issued. A massive, invaluable reference work on the forced movement of writers in the 20th century. [#035585] $150
$98
NY, Knopf, 1963. His second collection of poems. Inscribed by the author. Fine in a near fine, spine-sunned dust jacket with creasing to the base of the spine. [#912067] $300
$195
(Poetry)
click for a larger image of item #35326, Loving the Outlaw (Denver), (Mesilla Press), (1984). Mesilla Press Poetry Pamphlet #4. One sheet folded to make four pages; four poems. Four copies located in OCLC. Top edge sunned, with a small stain in the upper margin of the rear page; near fine. An early publication by this poet who won the 2010 American Book Award for Crazy Love. [#035326] $35
$18
(Nature)
click for a larger image of item #35316, Road to Survival NY, William Sloane, (1948). In this vaunted forerunner to the books of the modern environmental movement, Vogt makes his case for ecological interdependence and the need for sound stewardship. Jacket blurb by Aldo Leopold, among others. Uncommon: many listed "firsts" are book club editions. Small dent to upper rear board; near fine in a very good dust jacket with several unnecessarily tape-mended edge tears. A landmark volume, very scarce in the first printing and especially in dust jacket. [#035316] $350
$228
[Sacramento], (CoTangent Press), [1993]. A limited edition of a story from Thirteen Stories and Thirteen Epitaphs, preceded, in 1990 by a CoTangent edition of one handwritten folio copy, and issued here with revisions. This is Copy No. 23 of 200 copies signed by Vollmann and by the designer, Ben Pax. Illustrated by Vollmann. Fine in sewn wrappers and dust jacket. [#912137] $650
$455
click for a larger image of item #31168, Sibs Arlington Hts, Dark Harvest, 1991. A Publisher's Copy ("PC") of 400 copies signed by the author and by Phil Parks. Fine in a fine dust jacket and slipcase. [#031168] $125
$81
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Catalog 174