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Note: Sale prices are net prices -- no further discounts apply.

All books are first printings of first editions or first American editions unless otherwise noted.

New Rochelle, Elizabeth Press, (1965). Poetry by a writer of Cherokee-French descent, also known as Gogisgi. This is his first book. Stamped as having belonged to the literary magazine Epoch. Narrow dampstaining to both spine and foredge; thus very good in stapled wrappers. Scarce. [#026836] $45
$23
NY, Norton, (2002). A review copy of this collection of stories by the author of the National Book Award-winning Ship Fever. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket, with press release laid in. [#914752] $100
$65
(Latham), Paris Review Editions, (1989). An uncommon book of poetry by a writer who is, these days, more well known for his fiction, including First Light and Through the Safety Net. Baxter's first two books, in the early 1970s, were poetry and this was his third collection of verse. Signed by the author in 1994 with the added sentiment: "Even a scowl is a kind of style." Fine in wrappers. [#911350] $175
$114
(Foster City), IDG, (1999). Bookplate and wine label on the front endpapers. Inscribed by the author to Robert Stone and his wife in the margin of the bookplate, in 2000. Near fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#033701] SOLD
NY, Knopf, 1979. Uncorrected proof copy of his second book, a highly praised collection of stories. Laid in are two pages of publisher's promotional material, with review excerpts from Casey's first novel, including a John Irving blurb. Fine in tall wrappers, with a label pasted over bottom edge of pages. [#005033] $60
$30
Houston, Arte Publico Press, 1984. Inscribed by the author in 1986. Fine in wrappers. [#914438] $175
$114
click for a larger image of item #32274, December Songs Porthenys, [Self-Published?], 1988. Copy #58 of 100. Inscribed by the author to Peter Matthiessen and with a typed letter signed laid in: "I found this one copy of this tiny book, and I thought to send it to you the night before our departure for the old world (well it's all old and new isn't it?). I hear that you had a similar experience to what these little poems speak out from..." Chaskey continues in the letter with more personal news. More than 100 words. Poet-farmer Chaskey was the longtime head of Quail Hill Farm in Amagansett, New York, in eastern Long Island, and is considered "the spiritual father of the community farming movement." His first full-length book, the influential This Common Ground, was published in 2005; this chapbook precedes that book by nearly two decades. Near fine in self-wrappers. [#032274] $150
$98
click for a larger image of item #17761, A Darkness More than Night New Orleans, B.E. Trice, 2001. A limited edition of Connelly's novel, which features Harry Bosch and Terry McCaleb, the protagonist of Blood Work. One of 400 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine in slipcase. [#017761] SOLD
Chicago, Poetry, 1953. Warmly and lengthily inscribed by Dahlberg at his contribution, "Ushant, A Long Lotus Sleep," an excerpt from a work-in-progress. Near fine in wrappers. [#017387] $95
$48
click for a larger image of item #33373, The Abundance (NY), Ecco, (2016). The advance reading copy of this collection of "narrative essays old and new." Stray pencil mark to cover, else fine in wrappers. Uncommon: advance copies -- so-called "galleys," in the contemporary vernacular -- have always been scarcer than the corresponding trade editions, usually issued in hundreds of copies versus thousands for the published editions. But in the past couple of decades, since the start of the digital age, they have gotten even scarcer, as many of the marketing purposes they were used for are now accomplished using digital media and online resources. [#033373] $100
$65
click for a larger image of item #33010, Art D'aujourd'hui and L'Oeill (Paris), (1950-1959). Five issues of Art D'aujourd'hui (1950-1954) and eight issues of L'Oeill (1955-1959). Nonconsecutive issues, with Feitelson's markings throughout and his name written on a 1954 issue of Art D'aujourd'hui. Feitelson was one of the founders of what came to be called the Los Angeles School of painting, a post-surrealist style that developed into what became the "Hard Edge" style of abstraction. The first issue here of AD is without a rear cover and has detaching pages. At least one issue has an excision by Feitelson to a page. Overall the lot is very good. Together with Feitelson's copy of The Forum Exhibition of Modern American Painters (NY: 1916) that had been inscribed to him, although only "To Lorser" is now legible; a very good copy with a chipped jacket protector affixed to it. [#033010] $1,300
$975
click for a larger image of item #32871, Original Drawing Undated. An anatomical sketch by Feitelson, working on a male form, with a rocking chair on the verso. 4-1/2" x 8". Unsigned, but accompanied by a signed copy of the magazine Minotaure from 1933. The sketch shows some light green watercolor on the page and is near fine; the magazine has endured some unsuccessful attempts at reinforcing with a tape binding; the covers are detached. The signature, "Property of Lorser Feitelson," appears on the upper edge of the front cover. Feitelson was one of the founders of what came to be called the Los Angeles School of painting, a post-surrealist style that developed into what became the "Hard Edge" style of abstraction. This drawing exhibits a classical approach to draftsmanship. The issue of Minotaure is number 3-4, and features writing by Andre Breton, Tristan Tzara, and others; photographs by Man Ray and Brassai, among others; and artwork by Picasso, Matisse, Miro and Dali, among others. A glimpse of the artist's work, and a well-used example of a key surrealist publication, that provides some context for the artwork. [#032871] $1,500
$1,125
(Film)
click for a larger image of item #33335, Three Hours of Experimental Films on Alchemy Astrology, Magic Gorham/Portland, [University of Southern Maine], 1971. Poster advertising two showings of films by Kenneth Anger, Harry Smith, Stan Brakhage, Ed Emshwiller, and "one unannounced film on an American Mythical Event," to be held on two campuses of the University of Southern Maine. Anger's films were his landmark Scorpio Rising and his 1969 Invocation of My Demon Brother, which had a soundtrack by Mick Jagger and won a Film Culture award in 1970 for best experimental film. Brakhage's films included the Dog Star Man sequence and two others from the early 1960s, one of which includes a typo in its title ("Theigh" instead of "Thigh"). 19" x 24". An attractive and compelling design, four color on blue background; near fine. [#033335] $150
$98
(Fort Edwards), (ZBS Foundation), (1972). A set of six LPs (long-playing records). With two booklets laid in, including an introduction and an interview (about chai) by Ram Dass and a poem by Allen Ginsberg. Contents fine; boxed rubbed, near fine. [#028746] $95
$48
NY, Folkways Records, (1978). A long-playing record. Highwater reads from Anpao. Fine in a near fine sleeve, with a "Newbery Honors Book" sticker on the front panel. [#025538] $40
$20
Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1985. Both the first edition and the uncorrected proof copy; both from the library of Peter Matthiessen, who makes several appearances in the text, including digging the hole at the gravesite for Jones's ashes. The book is very good in a very good dust jacket with a Compliments of Houghton Mifflin card laid in; the proof is near fine in wrappers. [#031954] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #29934, Final Judgement Construction Company Annual Report & Literary Journal (n.p.), Well-Defended Press, 1990. A spoof on corporate reports, with contributions by a number of Canadian writers including Kinsella, Ann Knight, Spider Robinson, and others. Kinsella contributes "An excerpt from my essay, Treacherous Snivelling and Other Dangerous Trends in Contemporary U.S. Poetry." Also includes a poem (in Latin) by "Silas Ermineskin," a Kinsella alter-ego and one of the central characters in a number of Kinsella's highly praised Indian stories. Ermineskin's contribution is signed by "Ermineskin," somewhat illegibly. Also signed by Kinsella, Knight, Robinson and five others, presumably all the contributors, although the use of pseudonyms on the contributions makes it impossible to determine, from internal evidence alone, if this is the case. Folded sheets, with plain card-stock covers: apparently a home-made production by someone with a copier, a laser printer, and the friendship of a number of Canadian literary figures. Although the limitation is not stated, and the production methods did not preclude creation of more copies, we are told that there were 30 copies done. 24 pages, folded sheets in cardstock covers. OCLC locates only one copy, in the Canadian national archives. Fine. [#029934] $750
$525
click for a larger image of item #22972, Resumé and The Art of Self NY, Scientia-Factum, 1968. Kosinski's resume from 1970, the facts of which roughly correspond to to the biographical sketch at the rear of The Art of the Self, with the omission of his 1965 work Notes of the Author. Together with a copy of The Art of Self [NY, Scientia-Factum, 1968], a pamphlet containing short pieces relating to his National Book Award-winning novel Steps. Inscribed by the author. The pamphlet is edge-sunned; near fine in stapled wrappers. The resume is folded in thirds; edge-sunned with a small edge chip; near fine. A unique combination of items pertaining to Kosinski's writing career after the success of The Painted Bird and before the scandals that later plagued him after his celebrity, culminating in his suicide. [#022972] $750
$525
London, Weidenfeld and Nicolson, (1992). Inscribed by the author to Robert Stone and his wife: "Keep the good times rolling." Stone is mentioned twice in this memoir, and he has a blurb on the rear cover about Landesman's first book, Rebel Without Applause. Near fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#033745] $100
$65
click for a larger image of item #23675, The Corolla, 1947 and 1948 Tuscaloosa, University of Alabama, 1947-1948. Two volumes of the yearbook of the University of Alabama, where Harper Lee studied law between 1945 and 1949. The 1947 Corolla shows Lee as editor of the humor magazine Rammer Jammer; sitting on the Board of Publications; voted one of the "campus personalities"; pictured as a student of law; and as a member of Chi Omega and of Triangle, an honor society of seniors who guide freshmen. In all, at least a half dozen pictures of Lee. Wear to the edges, rubbing to the joints; near fine. The 1948 Corolla pictures Lee only as a campus personality: before completing her degree requirements, Lee left law school for New York City, where she worked as an airline reservations clerk (and wrote To Kill A Mockingbird). From Lee's campus newspaper, as quoted in the book Harper Lee by Kerry Madden: "[Lee] is a traditional and impressive figure as she strides down the corridor of New Hall at all hours attired in men's green striped pajamas. Quite frequently she passes out candy to unsuspecting freshman; when she emerges from their rooms they have subscribed to the Rammer Jammer." Check marks in text; board edges worn; very good. [#023675] $1,000
$700
click for a larger image of item #914206, In the Fall NY, Atlantic Monthly Press, (2000). The limited edition of his well-received first book, which was a Main Selection of the Book of the Month Club -- unusual for a first novel. Letter "F" of 26 lettered copies signed by the author. Quarterbound in leather; fine in a fine clamshell case. [#914206] SOLD
NY, Broadway Books, (2001). Inscribed by the author to Robert Stone, "with the greatest admiration," in the year of publication. A blurb by Stone, about Lipsyte's Venus Drive appears on the rear panel. Fine in a near fine, spine-sunned dust jacket. [#033752] $100
$65
Albuquerque, West End Press, (1992). Probably his most well-known collection of poems. Introduction by Jimmy Santiago Baca. Signed by the author in the month of publication. Pine Ridge address in pencil on flyleaf; very near fine in wrappers. [#025600] $75
$38
London, Harvill Press, (2000). First thus, collecting The Tree Where Man Was Born; African Silences; and Sand Rivers, with an introduction by Matthiessen for this edition. Unmarked, but from the library of Peter Matthiessen. Near fine in wrappers. [#032005] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #32371, The Snow Leopard NY, Viking, (1978). A second printing of his first National Book Award winner, which recounts a trip to the Himalayas with naturalist George Schaller in the hopes both of encountering a snow leopard in the wild and of coming to terms with his wife's recent death from cancer. From Matthiessen's own library and with more than a dozen passages marked in pen by Matthiessen, all having to do with the porter and camp assistant Tuktken. There are a couple of other passages marked in pencil, with page notations in the prelims. Rear blank excised, else a very good copy, lacking the dust jacket. [#032371] $565
$396
click for a larger image of item #32410, The Hidden West NY, Random House, (1982). The uncorrected proof copy. From the library of Peter Matthiessen and with his markings and a few notes in the text and on the rear cover, and with the author's address written in a different hand on the "About the Author" page. Several of Matthiessen's annotations mark passages referring to legendary Sioux leader Crazy Horse; Matthiessen's book about the Wounded Knee siege, In the Spirit of Crazy Horse, was published the previous year. Very good in wrappers. [#032410] SOLD
Bloomington, Indiana University Press, (1970). The poet's first book. Inscribed by the author to another poet in the year of publication "with love and best wishes, Sandy." Recipient's handmade bookplate on front flyleaf. Near fine, with various portions of the dust jacket clipped and pasted on the boards and endpages. [#022758] $40
$20
Toronto, Coach House Press, (1985). The first book, a poetry collection, by the author of the highly acclaimed novel Fugitive Pieces. Fine in wrappers. [#915358] $175
$114
NY, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, (1972). The uncorrected proof copy of this long poem based on the life and death of a Chilean highwayman in California in the 1850s. Bilingual edition. Near fine in tall wrappers, with a near fine copy of the dust jacket. [#019261] SOLD
Franklin Center, Franklin Library, 1998. The Franklin Library edition. A leatherbound limited edition, with an introduction written especially for this edition that keeps us from calling this title a departure for O'Brien: "Though I am known as a 'Vietnam writer' -- whatever that may be -- I have always pegged myself more as a 'love writer,' and in that regard Tomcat in Love is no departure at all." Signed by the author. Fine, without dust jacket, as issued. [#911811] $150
$98
NY, Doubleday, (1994). The advance reading copy of his second book, first novel. Winner of the 1993 Pirates Alley William Faulkner Prize for the Novel. Inscribed by the author: "For ___, this cold, cold book. Stay warm!" Fine in wrappers. [#030018] $115
$75
click for a larger image of item #31486, Children is All and Cracks (n.p.), (n.p.), 1961/1962. Mimeographed typescripts of two one-act plays, which were collected in his 1962 volume entitled Children is All. Inscribed by Purdy on the title page of Cracks to the poet Quentin Stevenson "with the sincere admiration of James" and additionally signed, James Purdy. Children is All (1961) runs 41 pages; Cracks (1962) runs 16 pages. Each is near fine; stapled in the upper left corner. Purdy was a controversial author whose works explored, among other things, gay themes at a time when this was taboo; his popularity and critical reception suffered as a result, but many of his more celebrated contemporaries considered him a genius and a great writer, among them being Tennessee Williams (who wrote a blurb for the book publication of Children is All); Edward Albee (who produced Purdy's play Malcolm); and Gore Vidal, who called him "an authentic American genius" and wrote in the New York Times article entitled "James Purdy: The Novelist as Outlaw" that "Some writers do not gain wide acceptance because their work is genuinely disturbing. Purdy is one of them." As best we can determine, OCLC lists only two copies of the former typescript and one of the latter in institutional collections. Another collection lists "photocopies" of these two plays, but these productions predate plain paper photocopying. Scarce works by a writer whom Jonathan Franzen called "one of the most undervalued and underread writers in America." [#031486] $1,500
$1,125
click for a larger image of item #23606, Skinny Legs and All [NY], [Bantam], [1990]. Point of sale display for this title. (No book included.) Cover art: 14" x 16" at longest point, meant to attach to display rack. Rubbed, mild edge wear; near fine. Suitable for framing if cropped. [#023606] $60
$30
(Greensboro), Unicorn Press, (1974). Poems from the "Poland 1931" sequence. Inscribed by Rothenberg to Clayton [Eshleman], "with admiration & thanks for the encouragements & challenge." Illustrated with posed photographs featuring Rothenberg and Kathy Acker, among others. One of 2000 copies in wrappers. Near fine. [#033542] $65
$33
NY, Simon & Schuster, (1982). A review copy of the author's first book, a baseball novel. Fine in a near fine dust jacket. Laid in is a typed note signed by the author, written on the publisher's stationery. [#023957] $40
$20
click for a larger image of item #29530, Others Ottawa, Borealis, 1972. The first book, a collection of poetry, by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Stone Diaries. Inscribed by Shields to the Canadian poet and novelist Rosemary Aubert: "For Rosemary/ with thanks for a delightful evening/ Carol Shields." Spine faded, with a little tear to the spine base; near fine in wrappers. A nice literary association copy of an important first book. [#029530] $750
$525
Toronto, Random House, (1993). Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Orange Prize, and Canada's Governor General's Award. Shortlisted for the Booker Prize. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#912757] $275
$179
click for a larger image of item #32523, A Yes-or-No Answer Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 2008. A collection of poems, warmly inscribed to Peter and Maria Matthiessen. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#032523] $100
$65
click for a larger image of item #915756, The Life of the Body Minneapolis, Coffee House Press/Espresso Editions, 1990. A story by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author, with six linoleum cut illustrations by Susan Nees. Number 99 of 170 numbered copies signed by the author and artist. A couple small faint spots to spine cloth; else fine in boards and publisher's ribbon-tied plexiglass case. An attractive production. [#915756] $950
$665
click for a larger image of item #31505, A Hall of Mirrors Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1967. His first book, a novel of drifters in New Orleans in the early Sixties caught up in the web of a quasi-religious political machine. Winner of the William Faulkner Award for best first novel of the year as well as a Houghton Mifflin Literary Fellowship Award. Inscribed by the author. Near fine in a very good, lightly foxed dust jacket with a creased tear to the lower rear panel. Basis for the film WUSA (the call letters of the right-wing radio station that figures prominently in the book), starring Paul Newman, Joanne Woodward and Anthony Perkins. [#031505] $715
$501
click for a larger image of item #25773, Ten broadsides (n.p.), (n.p.), (n.d.). Poetry by a Chippewa author. "Child of Hope," "Tiinowit," "Solemn Spirits," "When the spirit moves you...," "Seven Drummers," "An Old Man Asks," "We Are the Warrior Spirits," "The Wanderers Prayer," "There are warriors weeping in the garden...," and "Come unto me oh my children..." Also "Heal My Land" by Pat Swanson. Corner creasing to "Solemn Spirits," else fine. [#025773] $115
$75
click for a larger image of item #18218, The Accidental Tourist NY, Knopf, 1985. The uncorrected proof copy. A novel made into an award-winning movie that solidified Tyler's place as one of the foremost writers of her generation. This is the second issue proof, in red wrappers. A little surplus glue on the spine; else fine in a fine dust jacket. [#018218] $60
$30
NY, Knopf, 1968. The first of his novels to be both a critical and a substantial commercial success. A little sunning to the board edge and the spine; very near fine in a fine jacket. [#912073] $175
$114
(n.p.), (William B. Ewert), (1998). The first separate edition of this poem, issued as a holiday card. Of a total edition of 185 copies, this is one of 130 copies issued unsigned, but this copy has been signed by Updike and dated 1988 and additionally inscribed by Updike in three different colored pens: "Merry Christmas/ a card to warm yourselves by/ Cheers, John." Fine, in hand-addressed envelope, apparently meant to be hand-delivered as Updike has added, "Sorry to miss you - Happy Holidays!/ John." [#030257] $190
$124
click for a larger image of item #30282, The Dick Cavett Show. A Conversation with John Updike (n.p.), (n.p.), 1978. Transcript of two consecutive nights of Updike's appearances on The Dick Cavett Show in December 1978. Ten pages and eleven pages, respectively, plus cover sheet. Printed on rectos only. Near fine, in a blue acetate folder that has split along its fold. DeBellis and Broomfield A68. Later collected in Conversations with John Updike. [#030282] $565
$396
click for a larger image of item #30252, In the Cemetery High Above Shillington Concord, Ewert, 1995. A poem by Updike with wood engravings by Barry Moser. Of a total edition of 150 copies, this is one of 50 unnumbered copies printed on Rives lightweight paper and handcased in boards. Signed by both Updike and Moser. Fine, without dust jacket, as issued. Uncommon in the hardcover issue. [#030252] $650
$455
NY, Walker and Company, (1988). Her acclaimed first book, a mystery novel introducing attorney Neil Hamel of Albuquerque, New Mexico, as a new entry in the ranks of contemporary female sleuths, and the start of a new mystery series located in the American Southwest. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#913455] $275
$179
click for a larger image of item #33200, Man of La Mancha. A Musical Play NY, Random House, (1966). An extra-annotated copy: inscribed by Wasserman, "To --- ---, a fellow quixotick -- with appreciation, Dale Wasserman, in 1968. Wasserman, who had had success on Broadway with an adaptation of Ken Kesey's One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest in 1963, wrote the book for Man of La Mancha which opened off Broadway in 1965 and moved to Broadway in 1966, where it won the Tony Award for best musical. Tipped into this copy is a plethora of Quixotic ephemera, as well as four typed letters signed from Wasserman. There is also a photo of a Cervantes-themed bracelet, which the recipient had sent to Wasserman, and which Wasserman mounted and photographed. The four letters span 1968-1969. In one, Wasserman notes: "It amuses me, the way The Impossible Dream has swept the world, gone into so many languages and been put to so many uses. For most often it's used wrongly, in a perversion of its meaning..." The owner has rather compulsively annotated not only the text of the book, and the added articles, reviews, and illustrations; he has also annotated Wasserman's letters. Binding broken from all the ephemera laid in. Thus a good copy, with the dust jacket absent but the jacket flaps preserved and pasted to the endpages. A unique copy. [#033200] $750
$525
NY, World, (1971). The first book by this author of Blackfoot-Gros Ventre heritage, who was one of the most important and accomplished Native American writers of the post-1968 generation. Welch was a respected poet and an award-winning novelist, and wrote, with great power and sensitivity, fiction focused on both contemporary Indian life (e.g., Winter in the Blood) and historical material (the award-winning Fools Crow). Riding the Earthboy 40, a collection of poems, was never properly distributed as the publisher folded at the time of publication. It was re-published five years later in a revised and expanded form by Harper & Row. This is the first edition. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#002020] $40
$20
(Sydney), Macmillan, (1994). An eerie, atmospheric novel that was shortlisted for the Booker Prize and won the southeast Asian section of the Commonwealth Writers Prize. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#024484] $95
$48
click for a larger image of item #33360, What I'm Going To Do, I Think NY, Farrar Straus Giroux, (1969). The advance reading copy of his highly praised first novel, which went into numerous printings immediately after publication and which won the William Faulkner Foundation Award. This copy is inscribed (by the publisher?), "For John & Joan [Didion] Dunne." Woiwode and Didion were judges together for the 1972 National Book Awards. Spine creasing and a heavy front cover crease; minor foxing to the edges of the text block; good in wrappers. [#033360] $200
$130
NY, St. Martin's, (2005). Inscribed by the author to Robert Stone and his wife: "Two better friends don't exist." Fine in a fine dust jacket, which features a blurb by Stone on the rear panel, calling the book "a dramatic, often tragic, and grimly fascinating report from the annals of American hypocrisy." Fine in a very near fine dust jacket. [#033786] $150
$98
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