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E-list # 168

Books by Women

click for a larger image of item #4287, Counting, Inscribed, with Postcard NY, Vehicle Editions, (1978). The issue in wrappers of her second book, a collection of poems and prose poems, one of 474 copies of a total edition of 500; inscribed by the author to Seymour Lawrence in the year of publication. Additionally, laid in is an autograph postcard signed "the counter." Lawrence became Phillips' publisher with her next book, Black Tickets, which was her first collection of prose and the first book she had published by a major publisher. The postcard is fine; the book near fine. [#004287] $475
(NY), Vehicle, (1984). A small press volume, the first book appearance of this story. Issued in an edition of 2026, this is Letter "A" of 26 hardbound copies signed by the author and by Yvonne Jacquette, the illustrator. Fine in a fine slipcase. [#914270] $600
click for a larger image of item #4293, Fast Lanes (NY), Vehicle, (1984). A small press volume, the first book appearance of this story. Issued in an edition of 2026, this is copy "K" of 26 lettered copies, signed by the author and the illustrator, Yvonne Jacquette. Additionally, this copy is inscribed by Phillips to Seymour Lawrence: "For Uncle Sam --/ my companion/ in the fast lane --/ love,/ the speedy witch/ Jan. 24, '85." This story was later reprinted as the title story of a collection of Phillips' fiction published by Seymour Lawrence at Dutton. Fine in a near fine slipcase. [#004293] $600
click for a larger image of item #4290, How Mickey Made It St. Paul, Bookslinger Editions, 1981. An attractive limited edition of this story, one of 150 numbered copies. Signed by the author and additionally inscribed to Seymour Lawrence: "For the heroic Uncle Sam,/ intrepid publisher --/ love, JA." Clothbound without dust jacket; spine-sunned; near fine. [#004290] $375
click for a larger image of item #33353, To Be of Use [Berkeley], Maidu Press, [c. 1973]. "A Maidu Free Poem" broadside of the title poem of Piercy's 1973 collection. This version has one small change from the book version published in 1973 (there were several more changes in later versions). The edition of this broadside is unstated, but the broadside is marked as "1/ ." The only other Maidu Free Poems we are aware of are a 1971 Gary Snyder broadside, "Swimming Naked in the Yuba River," and "I Saw the Green Yuba Flow" by Franco Beltrametti. The Snyder was done in an edition of 200 copies; OCLC records two copies of the Beltrametti. The Maidu Press was the creation of two of Snyder's neighbors and friends, Steve Sanfield and Dale Pendell, both of them poets living on the San Juan Ridge, as Snyder was. This broadside reproduces calligraphy by Snyder, according to the Snyder bibliography. The presence of a blacked out mistake in the last line of the first stanza and the backward limitation (the copy number specified but not the number of copies, rather than vice versa) combine to suggest this is a trial copy or an unused or proof copy. We have no evidence that the edition was ever done: the Piercy bibliography lists no Maidu Press publication and OCLC shows no copies held in institutional libraries. A scarce, virtually unknown collaboration between Piercy and Snyder, both of them major American poets of the postwar era, and both associated with the counterculture of the 1960s and beyond. 8-1/2" x 11", on heavy orange paper. Shrinkwrapped with a board backing. Fine. [#033353] $650
Boston, Little Brown, (1962). Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket with maybe a hint of rubbing to the lower spine. A very attractive copy of the book that will probably stand as her greatest achievement. [#913402] $500
click for a larger image of item #27705, Postcards NY, Scribner's, (1992). The uncorrected proof copy of her second book of fiction and first novel. Winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award. Signed by the author. "Received" stamp front cover. Corner crease to rear cover; coffee staining to front cover and spine. Very good in wrappers. [#027705] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #32671, The Vampire Lestat Film Proposal 1988. Rice's own "bible-script" for a film "based on material in the novels Interview with the Vampire, The Vampire Lestat and The Queen of the Damned." Apparently named for the protagonist of all three novels rather than the title of the series' second book. Precedes the release of the film Interview with the Vampire (for which Rice wrote the screenplay) by six years. Development of a new version of The Vampire Lestat followed the success of that first film, but went nowhere and the film rights reverted to the author. A film of The Queen of the Damned followed in 2002, for which Rice did not write the screenplay and which contained many elements of The Vampire Lestat: neither Rice nor the critics approved of the sequel. This "bible-script" of Rice's seems destined to remain the series' missing link. Included here, in addition to Rice's 185 page script, are her list of "main characters, with notes on appearance" (2 pages); her 12-page treatment of a Queen of the Damned film; and one page on the "virtually endless" possibilities for more films (probably correct, as the 13th book in the series was published in 2018). Three hole-punched; mechanically reproduced sheets bound with two brads; title and date written on spine. Printed on rectos only with the header changing from "Rice/Vampires" to "Vampire/Rice" to "Vampire Chronicles." Small tears to the last page at the upper brad; near fine. A rare original work by Rice related to her most famous series of books, which rekindled the use of vampires in literature and the arts as stand-ins for human desire -- a trend that has persisted to the point that it is now a pervasive part of contemporary popular culture. We have been unable to find any record of another copy of this work appearing in the market, nor any evidence of it in institutional collections. [#032671] $3,500
click for a larger image of item #26868, Life (n.p.), Kyuryudo, 1992. Text in Japanese, but primarily a book of photographs. Inscribed by actor Anthony Quinn to film director Anthony Harvey: "Dear Tony, the man at the bookstore asked me if my friend could speak Japanese. I said you spoke photo language. Here is [sic] some wonderful photos to last you the following wonderful New Year. A. Quinn." A nice Hollywood association: Harvey directed Quinn in the television movie This Can't Be Love, which also starred Katharine Hepburn, who won an Oscar working for Harvey in The Lion in Winter. Tall quarto; spine crease, else fine in wrappers and near fine dust jacket, lacking the wraparound band. [#026868] $450
click for a larger image of item #31753, Lila NY, Farrar Straus Giroux, (2014). The advance reading copy of this novel by the Pulitzer Prize winning author of Gilead; this novel, also set in the town of Gilead, won the National Book Critics Circle Award. Slight splay to cover; else fine in wrappers, with publisher's promotional pages laid in. Like a number of other ARCs of recent years, this appears to have been done in minuscule quantities; we have seen very few of them on the market. [#031753] $125
click for a larger image of item #31490, The Brown Reader: 50 Writers Remember College Hill NY, Simon & Schuster, (2014). The advance reading copy of this collection of original writing by Marilynne Robinson, Rick Moody, Jeffrey Eugenides, Donald Antrim, Edwidge Danticat, Susan Cheever, Lois Lowry, Andrew Sean Greer, Meg Wolitzer, David Shields, Jincy Willett, and many others reminiscing about their time at Brown. A collection notable both for the extraordinary and amusing range of experiences included and also, frequently, for its behind the scenes glimpses of these authors as, not just emerging writers, but emerging adults. Robinson contributes "Higher Learning," about, among other things, discovering the writing of Jonathan Edwards. Because of the extent to which publishers' promotional efforts have become digitally oriented in recent years, printed advance copies like this one have become increasingly scarce, even more so than they had been in prior years when their numbers were already only a tiny fraction of the numbered of copies published. Trace wear to the spine ends; very near fine in wrappers. [#031490] $125
click for a larger image of item #33487, The Givenness of Things NY/London, Farrar Straus Giroux/Virago, (2015). Two advance copies of this collection of essays: the American advance reading copy, signed by Robinson, and a hybrid advance copy that uses American sheets bound into Virago wrappers as a British proof copy. This was Robinson's ninth book after four books of fiction and four books of nonfiction, which together brought her a Pulitzer Prize, two National Book Critic Circle Awards, and an Orange Prize. Robinson, who was interviewed by President Obama in 2015, also received a 2012 National Humanities Medal from the President. The U.S. arc is fine in wrappers; the U.K. hybrid is fine, but fragile: the perfect binding is not of the highest caliber. A Virago press release is laid in. [#033487] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #25722, Lost Copper Banning, Malki Museum Press, 1980. A review copy, so stamped on the front flyleaf, of this book that was published on the Morongo Indian Reservation. Inscribed by the author to another Native American poet: "For ____, Whose back must be bent though not broken from the weight of that same Dream Wheel - The destination is, must be, worth it!" With the recipient's handmade bookplate on the front flyleaf. Dust jacket panels clipped and pasted to boards; fine such as it is. A nice association copy. [#025722] $125
(London), HarperCollins Children's Books, (2011). The advance reading copy of the first British edition, and first paperback edition, of the first book in her bestselling young adult dystopian trilogy, written while Roth was a senior at Northwestern University and filmed in 2013. Gentle corner creasing; very near fine in wrappers. Uncommon in any advance issue. [#030798] $125
click for a larger image of item #33233, Harry Potter and the Doomspell Tournament [Goblet of Fire] NY, Scholastic, (2000). An advance publicity item for the transformative fourth book in the Harry Potter series, featuring the short-lived name Harry Potter and the Doomspell Tournament. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire was nearly twice as long as the preceding book; it was the first to be released on the same date in the U.K. and the U.S.; the first to have a Saturday release date so as not to conflict with the school day; the first to have a multi-million copy U.S. print run; and it was the first book in the series to not have an uncorrected proof or advance reading copy issued. Its title was intended to be kept a secret until publication day (July 8, 2000); a feat that was made somewhat easier as Rowling herself wavered on the title until at least March or April. The working title was simply "HP IV." However, Rowling's first intended title for the book leaked out, and offered here is a printed easel display card encouraging readers to pre-order their copies of Harry Potter and the Doomspell Tournament. Reportedly there followed a period during which the title was to be Harry Potter and the Triwizard Tournament. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire won the 2001 Hugo Award, the only Harry Potter novel to do so. The Doomspell Tournament easel card is 9" x 12", apparently unused; it has one small nick in a lower corner near a small portrait of Buckbeak the Hippogriff, else fine. [#033233] $500
click for a larger image of item #27817, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, and the Chamber of Secrets, and the Prisoner of Azkaban, and the Goblet of Fire, and the Order of the Phoenix, and the Half-Blood Prince, and the Deathly Hallows London, Bloomsbury, 1999-2007. The first printings of the deluxe editions of the (at the time) full Harry Potter series. Clothbound with pictorial onlays, all edges gilt; fine without dust jackets, as issued. The Azkaban, which was the first volume published in a British deluxe edition (Philosopher's Stone and Chamber being issued in a deluxe edition retroactively) had the smallest printing, (reportedly 7000 copies) and names "Joanne Rowling" rather than "J.K. Rowling" on the copyright page. Here together with the collector's edition of The Tales of Beedle the Bard [London: Children's High Level Group, 2008]. The leatherbound Beedle is in a drawstring bag, which, with ten illustrations by Rowling, are housed together in a large box made to look like a textbook, which is contained in the publisher's sleeve. Also included is the Sotheby's catalog for the auction of one of seven copies of the manuscript of Beedle the Bard, with an introduction by Rowling. Since the time of the last deluxe edition's release, the Harry Potter franchise has expanded with the completion of the 8-film series (with an additional three-movie prequel having debuted in 2016); original Rowling content on the Pottermore website; two Wizarding World theme parks; and a two-part stage play sequel (Harry Potter and the Cursed Child), which premiered in London, the script of which was released as the eighth book in the series. [#027817] $3,500
click for a larger image of item #32318, The God of Small Things (n.p.), (n.p.), [ca. 1997]. Tapebound typescript of this Booker Prize-winning first novel. 248 pages, 8-1/2" x 11", bound in printed light green cardstock covers, and shot from word-processed sheets rather than typeset ones. No indication of publisher (which, in the U.S., was Random House). After the considerable success of this book in England, where it was reprinted numerous times, Random House decided to do a glossy advance reading copy in pictorial wrappers. Consequently, few copies of the standard proof were done. We are aware of another, "in-house" state of the advance copy, which, if we remember correctly, was also 8-1/2" x 11" tapebound sheets, but typeset and in blue covers and listing the publisher on the inner pages. Uncommon; we've never seen this issue of the book before. Unmarked, but from the library of Peter Matthiessen. Near fine. [#032318] $500
click for a larger image of item #25729, The Dancing Horses of Acoma and Other Acoma Indian Stories Cleveland, World, (1963). A compilation of Acoma stories by a non-Native writer, aimed at children age 10 and up and illustrated by an Acoma artist, who was also a chief of the tribe. Inscribed by Rushmore to fellow author Inez Hunt. Fine in a mildly sunned, else fine dust jacket. [#025729] $150
click for a larger image of item #30807, Correspondence 1989-1990. Three typed letters signed to the editor of Art & Antiques magazine. The first, one page, written from Iceland in April 1989, proposes an article on how poets write about paintings, referencing, among others, her former teacher Elizabeth Bishop. Salter also speaks briefly of the latest book by her then-husband, Brad Leithauser. The second letter, two pages, June 1989, also written from Iceland, proposes a piece about growing up in a house with a collector of political memorabilia, and, as an aside, suggests there may be something to be written about the aesthetic sense (or lack thereof) in Iceland. The third letter, one page, November 1990, this time from Massachusetts, transmits a two-page (photocopied) poem she's written called "Art Lessons," written in lieu of an article on the lack of art in Iceland, which begins "Why has Iceland no Tiepolo?" Interesting, densely written letters, and a possibly unpublished two-page poem. All items fine. Envelopes included. [#030807] $350
click for a larger image of item #24990, The Tom-Walker NY, Dial Press, 1947. A second printing, but beautifully inscribed by Sandoz: "For Martha Deane: for her appeal, today, that we face reality, and the implications of mankind's obsession with the weapons of self-destruction. Gratefully, Mari Sandoz/ December 9, 1947/ this study of America in three post war periods: Civil War, and World Wars I and II." Sandoz has also written on the front flap: "Theme of book omitted in this blurb. Sorry. MS." "Martha Deane" was the radio persona of Mary Margaret McBride. Front hinge starting; near fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#024990] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #19332, The Annealing Cambridge/Nelson, Privately Printed, (n.d.)[c. 1959]. A broadside poem, 8" x 11-3/4"; printed in green on cream paper. Top edge sunned with several small edge tears; near fine. Uncommon. [#019332] $125
click for a larger image of item #32676, Echoing Women [Self-Published], 2001. A self-published artist's book, of a story that takes place over the last 91 minutes of one August day in 2001. Text and illustrations by Savage. Signed: "Artist's Proof 2001, CHS" on the final page. Ring-bound, with rubbed acetate covers; else fine. This material inspired a dance piece by Jennifer Chin, although we have found no evidence of its having been formally published nor listings for it in OCLC. [#032676] $200
click for a larger image of item #6083, Falling NY, Macmillan, (1973). The uncorrected proof copy of her well-received first book, which was chosen by Time magazine as one of the 10 best novels of the year. Inscribed by the author. Covers dust-soiled; else fine in wrappers. [#006083] $150
Boston, Little Brown, (2002). Her acclaimed second book, first novel, a story told from the point of view of a murdered girl and the surprise bestseller of the publishing season. After a modest first printing of 35,000 copies, rave reviews and word of mouth caused the book to go into numerous printings, with the result that the book sold more than 2 million copies in hardcover and stayed on the New York Times bestseller list for over a year. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#915568] $175
click for a larger image of item #29530, Others Ottawa, Borealis, 1972. The first book, a collection of poetry, by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Stone Diaries. Inscribed by Shields to the Canadian poet and novelist Rosemary Aubert: "For Rosemary/ with thanks for a delightful evening/ Carol Shields." Spine faded, with a little tear to the spine base; near fine in wrappers. A nice literary association copy of an important first book. [#029530] $750
Toronto, Random House, (1993). Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Orange Prize, and Canada's Governor General's Award. Shortlisted for the Booker Prize. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#912757] $275
NY, Simon & Schuster, (1981). Her second novel. Signed by the author. Fine in a very near fine, slightly edge-toned dust jacket. [#912775] $350
NY, Harper & Row, (1980). The first book by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of A Thousand Acres. Signed by the author. Small spot lower page edges; else fine in a very near fine, price-clipped dust jacket with minor wear at the spine base. [#912776] $500
click for a larger image of item #19624, Barn Blind NY, Harper & Row, (1980). The first book by the highly-regarded author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning A Thousand Acres. This copy belonged to the author Robb Forman Dew -- who provided dust jacket blurbs for Smiley's next two books -- and bears her ownership signature. A little dampstaining to lower spine and foxing to top edge; near fine in a very good, dampstained dust jacket with light chipping at the crown. A nice association copy, albeit not a presentation copy. [#019624] $300
click for a larger image of item #915756, The Life of the Body Minneapolis, Coffee House Press/Espresso Editions, 1990. A story by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author, with six linoleum cut illustrations by Susan Nees. Number 99 of 170 numbered copies signed by the author and artist. A couple small faint spots to spine cloth; else fine in boards and publisher's ribbon-tied plexiglass case. An attractive production. [#915756] $950
click for a larger image of item #33046, Secret Exhibition. Six California Artists of the Cold War Era San Francisco, City Lights Books, (1990). Solnit explores the cultural contributions of six California artists from the Beat era: Wallace Berman, Jess, Bruce Conner, Jay DeFeo, Wally Hedrick, and George Herms. Inscribed by Solnit. An early book by Solnit, who writes as a historian, cultural critic, wide-ranging intellectual, and political activist, and has as a result become one of the most highly respected voices of the current era, continually bringing fresh and surprising perspectives to difficult, longstanding questions and issues. Foreword by Bill Berkson. Strip of sunning on the rear cover near the spine, else fine in wrappers. [#033046] $300
Franklin Center, Franklin Library, 2000. The Franklin Library edition of her fourth novel. Winner of the National Book Award. Signed by the author. Leatherbound, all edges gilt, with a silk ribbon marker bound in. Fine. [#913723] $175
click for a larger image of item #30042, Women NY, Random House, (1999). A professional collaboration between the longtime companions, with photographs by Leibovitz and text by Sontag. Inscribed separately by both Sontag and Leibovitz, "to Joyce." Sontag, a winner of the National Book Award for fiction and the National Book Critics Circle Award for nonfiction; a MacArthur Fellow; and a Commandeur de l'Ordre des Artes y des Lettres, among other honors, died in 2004. This joint project by two of the most respected figures in their respective fields is scarce signed by both. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with a hint of edge wear and very mild damp rippling near the crown that is visible mostly on the verso. [#030042] $750
NY, Putnam, (1989). The advance reading copy of her first novel, which was a surprise bestseller and went into over 30 printings in its first year. Made into a well-received film by Wayne Wang in 1993. Tan co-wrote the screenplay, which was nominated for a BAFTA, Writers Guild, and USC Scripter award. Spine-faded; near fine in wrappers. [#028554] $150
Tualatin, Norwood Press, 2003. Of a total edition of 300 copies, this is number 79 of 200 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine, without dust jacket, as issued. [#914340] $125
NY, Riverhead Books, 1996. Inscribed by the author to publicist Sally Anne McCartin, "with many thanks for your time and good advice!" Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#912865] $175
click for a larger image of item #30843, A Slipping-Down Life NY, Knopf, 1970. A review copy of her third book, a rock and roll novel focused on an alienated teenage girl in an unlikely romantic relationship with a small-time rock singer. A 1999 film adaptation won two film festival prizes and was nominated for the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with trace foxing to verso, with review slip laid in. A very attractive copy of this early Anne Tyler novel. [#030843] $450
click for a larger image of item #24215, Celestial Navigation NY, Knopf, 1974. Her fifth book. Fine in a very near fine dust jacket with trace wear at the crown. [#024215] $400
click for a larger image of item #911151, The Clock Winder NY, Knopf, 1972. Her fourth book, which many consider her scarcest. Signed by the author. Label removal shadow on front board, else very near fine in a very near fine dust jacket with the slightest smudging on the rear panel. [#911151] $1,000
click for a larger image of item #24212, The Tin Can Tree NY, Knopf, 1965. Her second novel, a powerful and moving story of a young boy coming to terms with his little sister's death. A little foxing to top stain; else fine in a near fine, price-clipped dust jacket with a couple faint spots and rubbing to the spine. A very nice copy. [#024212] $1,500
click for a larger image of item #32692, Typed Letter Signed March 11 [1979]. A typed letter signed by Tyler, responding to a woman who had written to her, apparently after reading Tyler's article "Please Don't Call It Persia" in The New York Times Book Review, in which Tyler reviewed three Iranian novels, including Identity Card by F.M. Esfandiary. In part: "You are the first person I've ever heard of who's read Identity Card. I was beginning to think it was a figment of my imagination. (There's only one copy in the state of Maryland, which I go to enormous lengths to relocate every few years.)" She also mentions that she has heard from someone who knew Esfandiary personally and that "Esfandiary says he'll never write another novel, which makes me sad." Tyler also relates to her correspondent's tendency to follow impulses, saying that she herself, at 37, is just entering that stage and is "a little amateurish about it so far but trying hard." Lastly she says she will save the recipient's address, but that she hadn't been in New York since she was pregnant with her first child, "now 13." Folded in sixths for mailing. Fine. A warm response by the author to a seemingly intelligent and supportive letter from a fan. [#032692] SOLD
(Toronto), (Aya Press), (1982). Number 407 of 500 numbered copies signed by Jane Urquhart and by Tony Urquhart, the artist. 18-3/8" x 4-3/4". This is the second issue, in gray cloth. Pages uncut; two very slight corner taps; else fine. [#914603] $275
NY, Walker and Company, (1988). Her acclaimed first book, a mystery novel introducing attorney Neil Hamel of Albuquerque, New Mexico, as a new entry in the ranks of contemporary female sleuths, and the start of a new mystery series located in the American Southwest. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#913455] $275
click for a larger image of item #20063, Good Night Willie Lee, I'll See You in the Morning NY, Dial, (1978). The uncorrected proof copy of her third poetry collection, and the book preceding her Pulitzer Prize- and National Book Award-winning novel The Color Purple. Cardstock covers bound with a black tape spine, a format that suggests few were created. Slightly dusty with a small rear corner crease; else fine. [#020063] $750
NY, St. Martin's, (1991). Her first book. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#913464] $175
Bristol, Scorpion, (1994). The limited edition. Of a total edition of 90 copies, this is copy "L" of 15 deluxe lettered copies, signed by the author and by Andrew Taylor, who provides an introduction. Quarterbound in leather; fine. [#913470] $250
On Sale: $163
NY, Yivo, (1999). Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#030093] $200
(Bastardy)
click for a larger image of item #33602, Paternity Claim, 1803 Taunton, MA, 1803. The handwritten court documents for a paternity/child support case in Massachusetts in 1803, filed on behalf of a girl who (as best as we can tell) would have been 11 years-old at the time of "begetting," against a man of (we believe) 19. Two pages: the first is the complaint made by Attorney [Nicholas] Tillinghast on behalf of Sally White, in part: "Complains Sally White of Taunton aforesaid Singlewoman that at about the last of May or the first of June in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and two, she was begotten with child by Charles Baylies of Dighton is a County Labourer and the same child has since been born alive and is a Bastard, wherefore she prays This Hon. Court to examine this complaint and to adjudge the said Charles to be the reputed father...." The Court's examination of Sarah White, taken under Oath, follows, recording White's answers to five questions: 1. Are you with Child of a Bastard? Yes. 2. Who is the Father of the Child? Charles Baylies of Dighton. 3. Where did he beget you with child? At my father's house. 4. About what time did he beget you with child? About the last of last May, or some time in the beginning of June. 5. Upon the Oath you are about to take, have you any Doubt about Charles Baylies being the Father of the Child. No. The document is then signed by Sally White. Bastardy Law in Massachusetts at the time was designed only to relieve the State of the burden of the child, rather than as an arm of punishment for acts of fornication (or of rape, although age of consent in Massachusetts at the time was 10 years old). If we are correct about the participants, both Baylies and White would marry others: she would bear seven additional children, and die at the age of 32. Two pages, approximately 6" x 8", previously folded together as a docket and labeled with White's name and complaint on the outside. The attorney's statement is edge-torn at two folds; else both papers are near fine. [#033602] $750
click for a larger image of item #30151, In Black and White, Literary Magazine of Highland High School Salt Lake City, Highland High School, 1973. Vol. XV, No. XV, covering the 1972-1973 school year at Highland High, when Terry Tempest (later Williams) would have been 17 years old. Includes two pieces by Tempest: "Brand X," a 150-word commentary on the packaging of political candidates, and "Creative Writing," a short paragraph explaining her craft, in which she takes "craft" literally by comparing writing to sailing. Tempest is also listed in the front under "Honors" as having "Publication in National Poetry Anthology," "Publication in National Essay Anthology," and "Utah Poetry Society - second place." An early appearance in print by an influential writer-environmentalist-activist: Williams has received a Lannan Literary Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Wallace Stegner Award, the Distinguished Achievement Award from the Western Literature Association, and many other awards, including those that recognize her social and environmental activism as well as those honoring her writing. Tall stapled wrappers, with a corner crease to the rear cover; near fine. [#030151] $350
click for a larger image of item #15426, Pieces of White Shell NY, Scribner, (1984). Subtitled "A Journey to Navajoland," with illustrations by Navajo artist Clifford Brycelea. Winner of the 1984 Southwestern Book Award. Inscribed by the author in 1989: "For ____/ We are told a story/ and then we tell our/ own./ Bless you & these/ sacred lands." Pages 131-134 bear a small puncture wound, not affecting text; thus near fine in a very near fine dust jacket with slight rubbing at the edges. [#015426] $550
click for a larger image of item #17634, Jacob's Room NY, Harcourt Brace, (1923). The first American edition. Owner name on flyleaf; stray pen mark rear cover; some abrasion to spine label; modest general handling. About near fine, lacking the dust jacket. [#017634] $300
click for a larger image of item #23688, Monday or Tuesday NY, Harcourt Brace, 1921. The first American edition of this early collection of short fiction, in which Woolf explores the stream of consciousness technique that she used to great effect in later novels. One of only 1500 copies, this copy in the black cloth binding. Slight foxing to cloth; near fine in a very near fine, price-clipped dust jacket, professionally, preemptively strengthened on the verso along the folds. A beautiful copy; easily the most attractive one we've seen. [#023688] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #33362, The Years London, Hogarth Press, 1937. Dampstaining to cloth and the outer upper corner of the text block; foxing to endpages; a good copy in a good, spine-stained and darkened Vanessa Bell dust jacket that is edge-chipped and fragile at the folds. [#033362] $250
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Corinne Demas Archive for Eleven Stories High: Growing Up in Stuyvesant Town, 1948–68 Signed Books for $19 From the Library of Robert Stone