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E-list # 147

Year-End Clearance

Use discount code 2017 to get 50% off the 750 books we've had the longest.
(Salt Lake City), (Dream Garden), (1982). The second of the Wilderness calendars, with work by a number of prominent photographers, and text by Edward Abbey, Tom McGuane, Leslie Marmon Silko, Ann Zwinger, Lawrence Clark Powell, Wallace Stegner, Barry Lopez, Frank Waters, William Eastlake, John Nichols, and others. This copy has been signed by Eastlake and Powell, and photographers John Telford, Tom Till, Fred Hirschmann and Chris Wangsgard -- several of the finest and most highly respected photographers of the natural world working today. Fine. [#010416] $125
NY, Knopf, 1974. The uncorrected proof copy of this novel by the Japanese author of Woman in the Dunes, among others. Near fine in tall wrappers. [#019402] $80
NY, Random House, (1990). The uncorrected proof copy of this examination of human nature as it relates to the five senses, with frequent detours across the lines between nature and culture. Ackerman developed her literary reputation as an award-winning poet and later became a staff writer for The New Yorker. This volume of nonfiction was her first to gain wide critical acclaim and commercial success. Near fine in wrappers. [#015039] $30
NY, Knopf, 1992. The advance reading copy of the first American edition of this novel by the award-winning author of Chatterton, Hawksmoor, and others. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers and publisher's cardstock slipcase. [#014343] $20
NY, Scribner, 1928. A collection of stories, printed in an edition of 3005 copies. Slight offsetting rear pastedown; else fine in a very good, spine-tanned dust jacket with several small chips, including one at the crown that affects the title. Overall, an attractive copy. [#017681] $80
NY, Scribner, 1935. A psychological novel about a man's careful plans for a murder that he never commits. Abrasions front flyleaf; light offsetting to endpages; very good in a good, internally tape-strengthened dust jacket with small external tape shadows. [#017684] $50
Albuquerque, La Confluencia, 1978. Paula Gunn Allen, of Laguna-Sioux-Lebanese descent, was a Professor of Native American Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, and one of the foremost scholars of Native American literature in the country. In addition, she was a poet and novelist, and has edited award-winning collections of Native American women's writing. This is her second book, a collection of poems published by a small New Mexico publisher. Inscribed by the author in 1985 to Laura Coltelli, a well-known critic of Native American literature and the author of Winged Words, a collection of interviews with Native American writers: a nice association copy. Creasing near the spine folds; near fine in wrappers. [#016477] $350
(NY), Dutton, (1995). The uncorrected proof copy of this narrative work based on a performance piece that Allison wrote and performed after the success of Bastard Out of Carolina, her first novel. Together with the photocopied typescript, which reproduces numerous changes and corrections, presumably authorial, including the excision of several long paragraphs, still visible. Edge tears to the cover sheet; otherwise fine. The proof copy is fine in wrappers. Allison's first novel was highly praised, and controversial. It was adapted for a television miniseries which won an Emmy award and was nominated for several others, but was for a time banned in Canada because of the controversial subject matter. [#013485] $250
(Anthology)
Brooklyn, Long Island Review, 1973. Includes poetry by vets as well as an essay on "American Poetry From the Indochina Experience" by Stephen Sossaman, himself an accomplished poet and later a public speaker on the Vietnam experience. Most of Sossaman's essay is a review of Winning Hearts and Minds. Near fine in wrappers. [#010320] $20
(Anthology)
Garden City, Doubleday, 1986. The uncorrected proof copy of the year's O. Henry Award winners, with first prize awarded to Alice Walker. Other contributors include Bobbie Ann Mason, Alice Adams, Gordon Lish, Peter Cameron, Deborah Eisenberg, Stuart Dybek, Ward Just, and Joyce Carol Oates, who earned a "special award for continuing achievement," even then. Near fine in wrappers. [#014350] $30
(Anthology)
NY, Prose Publishers, 1972. No. 5. Contributors include Alan Ansen, Edward Dahlberg, M.F.K Fisher, Edward Foote, Stephen Goodwin, Edgar Munhall, Donald Phelps, Charles Rosen, Paul Schmidt, Jack Sullivan, Jon Cloud van Leuven, and Glenway Wescott. Bookstore stamp inside front cover; near fine in wrappers. [#017707] $20
(Anthology)
London, Nicholson & Watson, 1944. Wartime anthology of poetry and prose, with contributions by Frank O'Connor, Lawrence Durrell, Rhys Davies, Alex Comfort, Sean O'Faolian, George Barker, Fred Urquhart, and many others. Near fine in a very good dust jacket. A remarkably well-preserved copy of a small, fragile volume. [#013078] $25
(Anthology)
NY, Ticknor & Fields, 1989. The uncorrected proof copy. Contributions by Joan Didion, Robert Stone, Richard Ford, Julian Barnes, Annie Dillard, William Kittredge, Edward Hoagland, David Quammen and others. Fine in wrappers. [#009164] $25
(Anthology)
NY, Morrow, 1982. The uncorrected proof copy of twenty-five years of writing from The Village Voice. With pieces by Donald Barthelme, June Jordan, Jamaica Kincaid, Jules Feiffer, Norman Mailer, Edward Hoagland, Pete Hamill, Greil Marcus, and many others. Fine in wrappers. [#013083] SOLD
(Anthology)
Fullerton, Union of Vietnamese in the U, [c.1973]. Bilingual edition of poetry by Vietnamese, mostly about the war but also some folk poetry, etc., with a number of illustrations. Spine heavily faded; otherwise near fine in stapled wrappers. [#010322] $20
(Anthology)
(Washington), (Indochina Mobile Ed. Proj.), (1971). Vietnamese poems, translated into English, with poetry by classic and well-known Vietnamese authors intermingled with poems by students, soldiers and contemporary folk singers. Illustrated with drawings and other artwork by Vietnamese artists. Co-compiled by Don Luce. Obvious sticker removal abrasion; about near fine in wrappers. [#010309] SOLD
(Anthology)
NY, McGraw Hill, 1972. The wrappered reissue of one of the early, important collections of poetry by Vietnam vets, published by a small press that was started by vets. Later this title was picked up by a major New York publisher and reissued. An important volume, which introduced such writers as W.D. Ehrhart, Michael Casey and Gustav Hasford, among others. Inscribed by Michael Uhl. Very good in wrappers. [#010317] $20
(n.p.), Viking, (1993). The uncorrected proof copy of his first novel, which received considerable praise and helped get him selected as one of The New Yorker magazine's "20 best young American writers." Dusty, with a couple corner punctures on the rear cover; very good in wrappers. [#019664] $20
New Rochelle, Elizabeth Press, (1969). His third book, poetry. Near fine in a rubbed, near fine dust jacket. [#002177] $20
(Art)
Undated nineteenth century prints of Indian scenes from the Pacific Northwest, each measuring approx. 6-1/2" x 9" and mounted in 12" x 14" mats. The first is a portrait of a "Mahlemute Man and Woman" in traditional dress standing at a riverside camp, with salmon being dried and smoked in the background. The second depicts a "Beluga Hunter and Dwellings - Lower Kuskokvim, Alaska," with the hunter, dressed for kayaking, and his wife standing at water's edge, ready to launch the kayak. The third depicts two Indian men, a "Thlinkit [sic] and Man From Copper River," showing the different traditional dress of the two, with the Tlingit carrying a rifle and the Copper River man a bow and arrows. An interesting glimpse at an early view of the various native tribes of that region. All three are slightly age-darkened, else fine. [#002192] $150
Buenos Aires, Losada, (1960). The first edition of the final installment of Asturias' Banana Republic Trilogy. An attractive, very good copy in illustrated self-wraps. [#013509] $350
Buenos Aires, Goyanarte, (1956). A novel based on the US-backed overthrow of the Arbenz government in Guatemala in 1954 -- a Cold War-related move against a left-leaning nationalist government that did much to set the stage for the next three decades of tensions between the U.S. and the various Central American republics. Asturias, for his open criticism of Yanqui interventionism, was awarded the Lenin Peace Prize in 1966 -- the highest such honor conferred in the old U.S.S.R. The following year--in what may be construed as a battle for the hearts and minds of his constituency -- he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature, the West's highest international honor. A major novel by one of the most important writers of the postwar era, whose ability to integrate indigenous myths and social protest was a major accomplishment that helped shape the contemporary Latin American novel. Abrasions to front flyleaf and front cover; ink marks to three pages of text; some wear to top edge and creasing to spine; still a respectable copy in self-wraps. [#007850] $350
London, Doubleday, (2000). The uncorrected proof copy of the third novel by the author whose first novel, Behind the Scenes at the Museum, won the Whitbread Award. Small edge tear upper rear panel; else fine in wrappers. [#018514] $25
NY, Harper & Row, (1973). First American edition; this is the simultaneous hardcover issue. Fine in a price-clipped dust jacket. [#001234] SOLD
NY, Delacorte Press, (1966). A review copy of this anthology edited and introduced by Auden. Fine in a very good dust jacket, with publisher's promotional sheet and photo laid in. [#009189] SOLD
NY, Random House, (1960). Several page corners turned; else fine in a lightly spine-faded dust jacket with trace wear at the spine extremities and a bit of creasing to the rear panel. [#019411] $25
(Barrytown), Station Hill, (1980). A small, early collection of poetry. One of 1000 copies, 43 of which were numbered and signed. This copy is unnumbered and unsigned. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#000979] SOLD
NY, Henry Holt, (1998). The uncorrected proof copy of the script for Auster's film. Also includes an interview with Auster. Fine in wrappers. [#012166] SOLD
(Anthology)
Edinburgh, Scottish Academic Press, 1980. Essays by seven Latin American writers: Garcia Marquez, Sabato, Roa, Fuentes, Onetti, Donoso and Carpentier. Reprinted from the Forum for Modern Language Studies, Vol. 15, No. 2. Splaying to boards; near fine in a fine dust jacket. An uncommon volume, printing works by a number of the most prominent Latin American writers of the past half century. [#010738] $20
NY, Braziller, (1979). Uncorrected proof copy of the first American edition of this novel, originally published in the U.K. Fine in wrappers and dust jacket. [#004957] $25
NY, Harper & Row, 1989. The advance reading copy. Inscribed by the author. Bumped at spine crown; near fine in wrappers. [#013922] $20
NY, Doubleday, (1996). Her award-winning first book of prose, a memoir. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#016970] $20
(n.p.), Ives Street, (1989). A short poem about the Vietnam Memorial, bound in a handsome pamphlet that resembles the monument. The author is a Vietnam vet, a poet for 40 years, a longtime banker and financial analyst, and in recent years the president of the Poetry Foundation, a position he took after the foundation received a $100 million bequest. 6" x 4". Fine. [#010333] $20
(Van Nuys), Perivale, (1983). A chapbook collecting this former Marine's poems about the war. Near fine. Barth is one of the most accomplished of the poets to have written about the war. [#010335] $20
NY, Putnam, (1970). Fine in near fine dust jacket and inscribed. [#010426] $20
(NY), New Rivers Press, 1974. The second book, a collection of poetry, by the author of First Light, and others. This is the simultaneous issue in wrappers. The total edition was 600 copies, of which 400 were issued in wrappers and 200 in cloth. Baxter's first book was a poetry collection published four years earlier. Well-known these days as a writer of fiction, his first novel wasn't published until 1987, seventeen years after his first book and thirteen years after this volume. Near fine. A scarce title in either the hardcover or softcover issue. [#006249] $125
(n.p.), Viking, (1985). The uncorrected proof copy. A well-received collection of stories, which was the author's first book from a major trade publisher, after a couple of poetry chapbooks and a story collection from a university press. Fine in wrappers. In our experience, quite an uncommon proof. [#004980] $80
NY, Ticknor & Fields, 1989. The author's sixth book. Signed and additionally inscribed by the author. Fine in fine dust jacket. [#008462] $20
NY, Harcourt, Brace, (1950). The author's first book, a novel. Benchley, the son of writer Robert Benchley -- of Algonquin Round Table fame -- and father of Peter Benchley -- author of Jaws, among others -- is most noted for his many children's books. This copy is inscribed by the author: "For:/ Michael Stone/ What are you/ doing after the/ show?/ Nathaniel Benchley/ 23 February, 1950." Dusty top edge; else fine in a very good dust jacket with small chips at the spine extremities, rubbing at the folds, and some small staining to the rear panel. An uncommon book signed. [#019103] SOLD
[March 1988]. Berge, a longtime poet and novelist who was associated with the New York poetry avant-garde of the 1960s, introduces herself to the recipient, the editor of Art & Antiques magazine, as both a writer and an antiques dealer. The letter is a sales pitch for a scarab ring in her possession and includes a drawing: "To me, it looks like either a Scarab beetle (stylized in form), or/and some sort of old inkwell with plumes extending from it. That suits the idea that I'm into Scarabs and I'm also a novelist and writer." Signed by the author. Folded in thirds for mailing, with a resume and mailing envelope included. Fine. [#015470] $50
June 22, 1988. Two pages promising to send an article which will apparently deal with the parallels between American Indian and Japanese ways of living, the life of Maria Sanchez, and "life lived as an entity, all of a piece. The artist as not a soul divided..." Folded in thirds for mailing; holograph corrections. A nice letter, with good content. Signed by the author. Fine. With envelope. [#015471] $125
[October 1988]. Berge proposes an article on "a renowned Santera." Composed on a typewriter that makes periods look like commas; folded in thirds for mailing; else fine, with envelope. Signed by the author. [#015472] $25
(NY), Delacorte/Lawrence, (1981). The fourth of his novels to feature Carl Reinhart, beginning with his first two books -- Crazy in Berlin and Reinhart in Love, written in the 1950s -- and continuing with Vital Parts, published in 1967. Inscribed by the author to his publisher Seymour Lawrence, one of the giants of American literary publishing in the second half of the twentieth century. Near fine in a very good, spine-faded and edgeworn dust jacket. [#004016] $250
NY, Weidenfeld & Nicolson, (1989). Warmly inscribed by the author to another writer in the year of publication "with much love, much admiration and infinite thanks." Near fine, lacking the dust jacket. An excellent association copy. [#016976] $80
San Francisco, North Point, 1984. The uncorrected proof copy of this novel by the author of The Stone Boy (made into a well-received film with Robert Duvall) and The Infinite Passion of Expectation, among others. Her story collection, Women in Their Beds, published in 1997, won the PEN Faulkner Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award. Reviewer's notes (Alan Cheuse's?) on rear blank. Near fine in wrappers and proof dust jacket. [#015474] $40
San Francisco, North Point, 1984. The uncorrected proof copy of this novel by the author of The Stone Boy (made into a well-received film with Robert Duvall) and The Infinite Passion of Expectation, among others. Her story collection, Women in Their Beds, published in 1997, won the PEN Faulkner Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award. Near fine in wrappers. This title was reissued in 1997. [#015473] $20
San Francisco, North Point, 1984. The uncorrected proof copy of a novel by this award-winning San Francisco Bay Area writer whose critical accolades, especially from her fellow writers, far outstripped her public recognition, at least until her winning of the National Book Critics Circle Award. This title was reissued in 1997. "P.C" (Press Copy) markings on cover and title page; else fine in wrappers. [#013526] $25
(NY), New American Library, (1966). Her fourth book, third novel. Berriault, long considered a "writer's writer," won the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction for her story collection, Women in Their Beds, in 1997, shortly before she died. Top stain faded, spine slant; near fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#016131] SOLD
London, Faber, (1959). First British edition and first edition thus, printing the title poem plus selections from his other publications. Published in an edition of 1000 copies. Near fine in a very good, price-clipped dust jacket. [#004527] SOLD
NY, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1970. Review copy of this collection of new poems, many of which are autobiographical and deal directly with his life and work. Fine in a very mildly-sunned, near fine dust jacket. [#014758] $25
[NY], Farrar, Straus & Giroux, [1983]. Galley proof for the jacket copy of Bishop's second volume of collected poems. Her earlier volume, published in 1969, won the National Book Award. One long page, approximately 23" x 6-3/4", folded in fourths; near fine. [#015485] $50
London, Cape Goliard, 1968. Of a total edition of 7750, 2750 were for sale in the U.S., of which this is one of 750 hardcover copies. Fine in a near fine acetate dust jacket. [#001273] $20
Garden City, Doubleday, 1973. His first book, a collection of short fiction, by this writer who is married to author Bharati Mukherjee. Inscribed by Blaise. One light corner bump; else fine in a very good dust jacket. [#006265] $25
NY, Obolensky, (1961). The first novel by this erstwhile enfant terrible of the literary scene in the early 1960s. This received good critical reviews and was adapted for Broadway by Lillian Hellman under the title, My Mother, My Father and Me. Inscribed by the author in 1976, in part "Novel #2/ finally on the road." Fine in a very good dust jacket. [#007294] $25
NY, Atheneum, 1982. The author's first novel. Signed. Near fine in a fine dust jacket. [#012124] $20
(Fredonia), White Pine Press, (1990). A volume of contemporary Coyote tales -- poems and short prose pieces -- with illustrations by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#016521] SOLD
(Pocket Poets Series)
(San Francisco), City Lights Books, (1970). The first book edition of this powerful anti-war poem, which was widely distributed in a number of formats at the height of the protests against the Vietnam War. Owner name. Near fine in wrappers. [#017564] $20
(Poetry)
(n.p.), (n.p.), [c.1969-1971]. A small collection (10 items; 7 authors) of signed fair copy poetry and typed and autograph notes signed, solicited by a collector in the early 1970s, as follows: Philip Booth, a fair copy of "Was a Man" with an autograph note signed at the bottom of the page; Marc Connell, a typed note signed transmitting two autographs (not present); Richard Eberhart, a typed note signed soliciting information and assurances from the recipient before agreeing to sign a poem; Barbara Howes, signed fair copies of "Troy Weight Taken" and "A Night Picture of Pownal" and a signed Christmas greeting entitled "Talking to Animals;" David Ignatow, a signed fair copy of "Get the Gasworks," which Ignatow has re-titled by hand "Simultaneously;" Josephine Jacobsen, a signed fair copy of "Country Bath;" William Stafford, an autograph note signed agreeing to be part of the collection; and, lastly, a note from Thornton Wilder's sister Isabel explaining that Thornton is not well enough to participate. Most of the items are folded for mailing; else fine. [#018709] $250
NY, Doubleday, (1996). The advance reading copy of this updated look at myths and misconceptions about contemporary Indian tribes and tribal life, with an emphasis on changes that are taking place on reservations, largely beyond the view of white America. Fine in wrappers and signed by the author. [#016528] $25
Buenos Aires, Gleizer, 1930. Borges' seventh book, a biography of Buenos Aires street poet Carriego. Attractively rebound in gilt-stamped quarter leather and marbled paper boards, with original wrappers (pink issue) bound in. Previous owner name on first blank; foxing to text, mostly confined to the outer pages; a very good copy. While the print run for this title is not indicated in the bibliography, earlier Borges titles had been printed in numbers ranging from 300 to 500 copies, and this likely had an extremely small printing as well. [#000994] $375
NY, Crown, (1968). Foreword by Borges to this book of photographs by Rene Burri, with text by Jose Luis Lanuza. Quarto; fine in a very good dust jacket missing some chips at the corners and the lower front panel at the spine fold. [#017353] SOLD
Garden City, Doubleday, 1959. The author's first novel, about Vietnam just after the partition, and one former landowner's attempt to escape the North and reach freedom in the South. Near fine in a very good, price-clipped dust jacket. [#009834] $40
Garden City, Doubleday, 1959. The author's first novel, about Vietnam just after the partition, and one former landowner's attempt to escape the North and reach freedom in the South. Very good in a very good dust jacket. An uncommon early novel. [#009833] $40
NY, Simon & Schuster, (1997). A first novel written from the point of view of a wolf, by a Montana author. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#016979] $25
(Anthology)
NY, Prose Publishers, 1972. No. 4. Contributors include Marius Bewley, Paul Bowles, Edward Dahlberg, Elizabeth Hardwick, William Heyen, Robert Payne, Henri Peyre, Donald Phelps, Reynolds Price, Jack Sullivan, and Virgil Thomson. Bookstore stamp inside front cover; near fine. [#017706] $20
London, Peter Owen, 1985. The second British edition of this title first published in 1963. Inscribed by Bowles: "For Mary Robbins/ with best/ Paul B./ 17/XII/92/ Tangier." Robbins was a friend and neighbor of Bowles's biographer, Virginia Spencer Carr; Robbins accompanied Carr on several trips to Tangier, and she housed Bowles when he traveled to the U.S. for surgery in 1994. Fine in a very near fine dust jacket with a small nick to the rear panel. [#017000] $175
NY, Macmillan, (1977). The second book by the author of The Redneck Way of Knowledge. Inscribed by the author to novelist Robert Stone: "Your work has been important to me since I read Hall of Mirrors in 1968 at Stanford (I was a writing fellow there also)..." Slight foxing to top edge; else fine in a fine dust jacket with trace wear at the spine extremities. [#017654] $200
NY, Vintage Books, (1995). The first Vintage Books edition, with a new introduction by Dorothy Allison. Inscribed by Boyd to another well-known writer. Fine in wrappers. [#017022] $50
NY, Putnam, (1969). A novel of a group of U.S. soldiers captured in Vietnam and indoctrinated by a defector. Fine in a rubbed, near fine dust jacket. [#009837] $25
NY, Baron, 1971. A review copy of the trade edition. Fine in a rubbed, near fine dust jacket with minor edgewear. [#009840] $20
(NY), (Houghton Mifflin), (1994). The uncorrected proof copy. This is shot from manuscript, rather than having been typeset -- a format which typically suggests small distribution -- and is considerably scarcer than the glossy advance reading copy of this title that was issued. Fine in wrappers. [#019422] $50
Garden City, Doubleday, 1974. The uncorrected proof copy of her first book of fiction, a collection of stories. Publisher's informational sheet present but detached from front cover, leaving glue residue there. Mild creasing to rear cover; still near fine in tall, white wrappers. Uncommon format. There was also a comb bound issue in red wrappers. [#005660] $150
Garden City, Doubleday, (1976). The uncorrected proof copy of her third book and first novel. Warmly and effusively inscribed by the author two months prior to publication: "____/ How Gerda would love you/ (for your enthusiasm, your vigorous/ devotion)! Whether or not you'd/ want to be loved by Gerda is/ another story)./ But for now I, who made/ Gerda, love you. I hope that's/ sufficient.../ Rosellen." Partial title written on the lower page edges; glue residue showing on front label; very near fine in tall wrappers. A scarce proof, and a nice inscription. [#008060] SOLD
NY, Dial Books, (1997). A well-received autobiography that is also a memoir of the author's grandfather, in which the author traces the circuitous and often searing path to discovering his Native American heritage. Fine in a fine dust jacket, and signed by the author. [#016562] $20
(Amsterdam), (De Kiva), (1989). A review of Bruchac's work, in Dutch, inscribed to Joseph Bruchac, with a few translator's notes expressing that the review is positive. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#016568] $50
Austin, Cold Mountain, 1975. One of 700 trade copies in wrappers, of a total edition of 1000. According to the colophon, these were distributed free to Patrons of the Cold Mountain Press. Although not called for, this copy is signed by the author at the end of the text. Fine. [#002227] $20
Ithaca, Ithaca House, (1971). The second book, and first regularly published volume, by this writer of Abenaki descent, who has carved out a unique place in contemporary American Indian literature as a publisher, poet, novelist, anthologist, storyteller and chronicler of traditional stories. Warmly inscribed by the author to his grandmother: "For Grandma/ For her birthday./ July 4, 1972/ Love,/ Sonny." Joseph "Sonny" Bruchac was raised by his grandparents, and his grandmother influenced his early love of reading. Some staining to front cover and some rubbing and surface peeling there. Very good in wrappers. A nice association copy. [#016536] $375
Merrick, Cross-Cultural Communications, 1980. A collection of poems, Cross-Cultural Review Chapbook 10, illustrated by Kahionhes (John Fadden). This copy is inscribed by Bruchac to his parents: "Moon of Falling Leaves/ 1980/ For Dad & Mom/ Peace,/ Your Son," with his signature Kokopelli drawing. According to the text, a "translator's son" is a term used among certain of the Lakota people to refer to a person of mixed Indian and white ancestry. Bruchac's father was Slovak; his mother was English and Abenaki. Fine in wrappers. [#016549] SOLD
NY, Putnam, (1976). An advance review copy of this nonfiction work, which was made into a television miniseries. Friendly Fire chronicles the radicalization of a patriotic Midwestern family after their son is killed by "friendly" (i.e., U.S.) fire and they try to get the details from a balky government seemingly more interested in protecting those responsible, but still living, than in honoring the dead. An important book, which chronicles the process by which opposition to the war filtered from the "radical fringes" of society into the middle class mainstream. Spine heavily cocked; otherwise near fine in a near fine dust jacket with one open edge tear at the base of the spine. [#009843] $20
(n.p.), HarperSanFrancisco, (1998). The advance reading copy of a novel by a writer who is respected as both a literary author and as a writer of religious and spiritual sensibility--a surprisingly uncommon combination in today's literary world, at least in the U.S. Fine in wrappers. [#013548] $20
San Francisco, Harper & Row, (1990). The uncorrected proof copy of this novel about a family and a young boy's coming of age during the Great Depression. Fine in wrappers. [#015506] $20
NY, Atheneum, 1977. The uncorrected proof copy of a title in the sequence of novels by this writer/theologian about Leo Bebb and Antonio Parr, founders of the Church of Holy Love, Inc. Fine in wrappers. [#015504] $20
(Anthology)
NY, Winter House, (1972). Eight plays by, among others, Ed Bullins, Adrienne Kennedy, Megan Terry and LeRoi Jones. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with an edge tear at the upper front panel. Signed by Bullins, and inscribed by Kennedy. [#013079] SOLD
NY, Norton, (1961). The first American edition of his fourth novel, and his first book to be published in the U.S., preceding his dystopian classic, A Clockwork Orange, by two years. Small bookplate front pastedown; else fine in a very near fine, price-clipped dust jacket with slight fading to the red spine. An exceptionally nice copy of an early book by one of the most important authors of his time. [#014764] $50
NY, Atheneum, 1985. A novel by the author of the Pulitzer Prize nominee The Buzzards and the National Book Award nominee Raw Silk. Warmly and lengthily inscribed by Burroway to award-winning writer Jay Neugeboren, author of Imagining Robert, among others, and dated in the year of publication. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#005664] $150
(NY), New Directions, (1976). His fourth volume of fiction, but only his second to be published in this country. Inscribed by the author to a well-known author and critic: "To Richard Gilman/ with devoted admiration -/ Frederick Busch." Pages faintly acidified, else fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#019670] SOLD
NY, Oxford University Press, 1991. A volume in the Schomburg Library of Nineteenth Century Black Women Writers. With a foreword by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Reprints all of the writings of this Black-Indian author, whose writings consciously attacked the stereotypes of both African-Americans and Native Americans of the time. Fine, without dust jacket, as issued. [#016575] $20
NY, Knopf, 1998. The uncorrected proof copy of this novel, a thriller, by the author of a number of comic novels, including Jujitsu for Christ and others. Fine in wrappers. [#010766] $20
NY, Horizon, (1983). His third novel, set in New Mexico during the development of the atomic bomb. A fast-paced story and an intellectual adventure of high order. Signed by the author. Fine in a near fine, mildly rubbed dust jacket. [#014399] $25
NY, Horizon, (1983). His third novel, set in New Mexico during the development of the atomic bomb. A fast-paced story and an intellectual adventure of high order. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#000849] $20
NY, Horizon, (1983). His third novel, set in New Mexico during the development of the atomic bomb. A fast-paced story and an intellectual adventure of high order. Signed by the author. Fine in a very near fine dust jacket with just a touch of rubbing at the crown. [#014398] $50
NY, McBride, 1934. The limited edition, one of 153 numbered copies signed by the author as "Branch Cabell," during the time in his career when he was trying to distinguish his later works from the earlier works that comprise the Biography of Manuel. Front endpages splitting at hinge, light wear to cloth extremities; near fine without dust jacket, as issued. [#010476] $50
Portland, Falmouth Book House, 1936. Copy No. 23 of 300 numbered copies signed by Caldwell. This attractive limited edition is the first separate edition of this prose-poem, which appeared, in slightly different form, as the final piece in the collection American Earth, although it was dropped from the reprint editions of that collection. Red boards and vellum spine; wood engravings by Russell Frizzell. Fine in a near fine slipcase. Scarce. [#019769] $375
Boston, Little Brown, (1951). Her first book, a collection of stories. Fine in a very good dust jacket with creasing on front cover and minor edgewear. [#005666] $20
NY, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, (1971). Fine in a fine, price-clipped dust jacket with a gutter nick at the front spine fold. Still, an exceptionally nice copy. [#000850] $50
NY, Doubleday, (1994). His first book, a highly praised collection of stories. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket with blurbs by Harry Crews, Ann Beattie, Padgett Powell and Joy Williams. [#014408] $20
London, Faber and Faber, (1994). The first British edition of this novel by the two-time Booker Prize winner. Signed by the author. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with one short tear at the lower rear spine fold. [#014409] $25
NY, Harper & Row, (1981). Uncorrected proof copy of the first American edition of this collection of nine stories. Covers mildly sunned; near fine in wrappers. [#005025] $20
(n.p.), Delacorte, (1976). Carter's most famous book, which its publisher originally identified as "a true story" while it identified the author as a "part-blood Cherokee who is Storyteller in Council to the Cherokee Nations." A dozen years after its initial publication, The Education of Little Tree was chosen by independent booksellers as the book they most liked to sell and it became a word-of-mouth bestseller in a paperback edition published by the University of New Mexico Press. Later, Carter was discovered to be a white man from Alabama who had worked for right-wing politician George Wallace, writing racist propaganda. Carter may have written racist tracts for George Wallace, but in The Education of Little Tree he endorsed humanist values of a high order, which he ascribed to Native American traditions -- respect for the land and one's family, honoring one's elders, promoting generosity and good faith, abhorring hypocrisy and brutality. Even as fiction, The Education of Little Tree raises serious and difficult questions, but it has been taken by many as strongly promoting a healthy sensitivity to, and respect for, Native American traditions and perspectives. In some circles, the question of the book's authenticity is today less of an issue than that of its sentimentality. Bound in the cheap "perfectbound" style, with the pages glued to the spine rather than sewn in signatures. Such bindings have proven extremely fragile over the years, which helps explain the scarcity of relatively recent titles such as this one. Spine lean; spotting to page edges; near fine in a near fine, price-clipped dust jacket with modest edge wear. [#013556] $125
(NY), Delacorte, (1978). A novel of Geronimo, reflecting the author's interest in Indians and in southwestern American history. Slight foxing to top edge; else fine in a fine, price-clipped dust jacket and signed by the author. A scarce signature. [#003756] SOLD
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