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E-list # 147

Year-End Clearance

NY, Delacorte/Seymour Lawrence, (1973). The uncorrected proof copy of his second novel. Inscribed by the author. Near fine in edge-sunned tall wrappers. Uncommon. [#013025] $80
Garden City, Doubleday, 1966. Her first collection of poems to be published by a mainstream trade publisher. Signed by the author with a small drawing on the title page. Rear hinge starting; near fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#000346] $25
NY, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, (1988). Uncorrected proof copy of this collection of short prose pieces, with publisher's annotations ("Press Copy," etc.) on the front cover and first blank. This is the first state proof, with thicker, less crisp lettering on the spine. Fine. [#005580] $35
NY, Dial, (1979). The uncorrected proof copy. Inscribed by the author in 1978. Fine in wrappers. [#000355] $50
NY, St. Martin's, 1993. The first American edition. Fine in a fine dust jacket and signed by the author. [#009548] $20
NY, Dutton, (1926). Adaptations by Walton of traditional Blackfoot and Navajo songs. An edition limited to 750 copies. This is a very good copy in decorated boards, without dust jacket. Introduction by Witter Bynner, who had recently spent three years among the Pueblo and Navajos of the Southwest. [#003799] $20
[1983]. A holiday card, bearing the news that "we sold Red Baker to Dial Press. Hosanna to the Highest!... Now I can get on with a new [book] and more lovely agony." Red Baker was the breakthrough book for Ward, who until then was best-known for the film made of his earlier novel, Cattle Annie and Little Britches. Fine. [#013043] $20
Dallas, Pressworks, (1980). Of a total edition of 376 copies, this is an unnumbered copy, though still signed by Warren and the illustrator Bill Komodore (although the volume does not appear to be illustrated). Laid in is the musical score by Alex Haieff, which is unsigned. Fine. [#007239] $25
NY, Viking, (1963). The uncorrected proof copy in comb-bound printed cardstock covers of this landmark volume relating the worldview of the Hopis, as compiled by Waters from the tales of thirty Hopi elders. A matter of some controversy in later years -- some people questioned the authenticity of the material or the qualifications of those who provided it -- this book nonetheless was profoundly influential in the Sixties, as another of the seminal volumes bringing some version of a Native American perspective and ethos to the mainstream society: this was a counterculture classic and a staple on college campuses in the late Sixties and early Seventies, thus contributing to the general push toward a more multicultural society. Waters' father was reportedly part Cheyenne, and Waters was an ardent admirer of, and advocate for, the values of Native American culture. A bit of corner creasing and dust soiling to covers; near fine. [#002732] $1,250
Chicago, Swallow Press, (1975). A speculative and philosophical view of Mesoamerican history and the indigenous Indian cultures that developed there, by a longtime writer on Native American issues. Owner name front flyleaf and spot to foredge; else fine in fine, price-clipped dust jacket. [#002734] $20
NY, Random House, (1993). The advance reading copy of this memoir of Watkins' experience in boarding school. Uncommon for such relatively recent vintage. Fine in wrappers. [#012495] $20
(Minneapolis), Milkweed Editions, (1993). His highly praised, award-winning novel. Signed by the author. This one has the creasing on the pastedown; else fine in a fine dust jacket. [#014690] SOLD
NY, Summit, (1990). The uncorrected proof copy of this coming-of-age novel, the fourth book by the author of The Car Thief. Slight spine roll, else fine in wrappers. [#018244] $20
NY, World, (1971). The first book by this author of Blackfoot-Gros Ventre heritage, who was one of the most important and accomplished Native American writers of the post-1968 generation. Welch was a respected poet and an award-winning novelist, and wrote, with great power and sensitivity, fiction focused on both contemporary Indian life (e.g., Winter in the Blood) and historical material (the award-winning Fools Crow). Riding the Earthboy 40, a collection of poems, was never properly distributed as the publisher folded at the time of publication. It was re-published five years later in a revised and expanded form by Harper & Row. This is the first edition. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#002020] $50
NY, Harper & Row, (1979). The uncorrected proof copy of his second novel. Pages reproduce copy editor's corrections. Very good in wrappers. [#003284] $150
NY, Pantheon, (1984). The uncorrected proof copy of the first American edition. Fine in wrappers. [#014325] $20
(Edinburgh), Rebel, Inc., (1996). A collection of novellas by six Scottish writers, including Welsh, Alan Warner, and four others. Fine in wrappers. [#004911] $25
Bos, LB, (1959). Second printing. Inscribed by the author. Good in a good dust jacket. [#011344] $20
London, Chatto & Windus, 1931. Nathanael West's copy of Huxley's collection of poetry, with West's holograph notes on five of the front and rear endpages. Approximately 250 words, mostly quotes of other writers -- Huxley, Gray, Shakespeare; some light, but most quite serious: "In matters of love it is absurd to stand on your dignity and claim your rights. Such experiences cannot be judged and calculated like a matter of business. One gives as much and as long as one can & one does not bargain. Take what is given to you." West concludes with: "The paths of glory lead but to the grave." The year this book was published, West published his first novel. Later in the 1930s, both West and Huxley were employed as Hollywood screenwriters. West died in 1940 at the age of 37. The provenance of this book leads from West to his brother-in-law, S.J. Perelman, to the writer and bookseller, George Sims, who recounts the circumstances of his purchasing books from Perelman in the early 1970s, presumably including this one. A photocopy of a note from Sims is laid in. Fading to spine, spotting to cloth, short tear to lower front joint; still very good, without dust jacket. Publisher's extra spine label tipped to rear free endpaper. A wonderful glimpse of West's musings and inner life. [#017974] $3,500
On Sale: $2,625
London, Hutchinson, (1966). The third novel by this prolific writer, this being the correct first edition, preceding its U.S. publication. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with the lamination separated along the front spine fold. Signed by the author. [#000361] $50
Garden City, Doubleday, 1971. A review copy of this novel, which includes as an afterword an interview between West and publisher George Plimpton about the book. Inscribed by the author. Fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#000365] $50
NY, Harper & Row, (1976). A fictional sequel to Words for a Deaf Daughter. Warmly and lengthily inscribed by the author in the year of publication, with a quote from Kafka's Great Wall of China. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#000370] $50
London, Gollancz, 1971. A novel, the sequel to Alley Jaggers, following the same family. Inscribed by the author. Fine in a very near fine dust jacket. [#000363] $20
(NY), (Harper & Row), (1970). A review copy of this novel, the sequel to Alley Jaggers. Signed by the author. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with one small spot of rubbing on the front panel. [#000364] $25
NY, Harper & Row, (1970). A review copy of the first American edition of this volume of nonfiction about the author's struggles to comprehend and come to terms with his daughter's deafness and brain damage. Inscribed by the author. Fine in a very near fine dust jacket. This title was reprinted some 20 years after the original edition. [#000362] $50
[San Francisco], [Auerhahn Press], 1964. A broadside poem. One of 125 copies. 8-1/2" x 12", fine. [#019387] $50
San Francisco, Self-published, 1965. A handbill advocating the celebration of "Gentle Thursday," March 25, 1965, as a work-free, commerce-free day of kindness and calmness in the pursuit of "peace & quiet & liberty for all." This handbill -- in effect, a Whalen broadside -- is a scarce, ephemeral item, created by the author and reproducing his calligraphic writing. 8-1/2" x 11"; fine. [#019388] $125
London, Cape, (1979). The British edition of the author's pseudonymous first book, which won the National Book Award for best first novel. Tiny spot to top stain; else fine in a fine dust jacket. [#014330] SOLD
London, Cape, (1979). The proof of the British edition of the author's pseudonymous first book, which won the National Book Award for best first novel. Fine in a near fine proof dust jacket. [#014331] $80
[1921]. May 30 [1921]. Written to Herbert Fay, Custodian of Lincoln's Tomb. One 8-1/2" x 11" sheet of white lined paper, written on both sides. This letter refers to White Eagle's being in charge of an exhibit in Chicago for the Custer Battlefield Highway Association and to his efforts to contact an Apache named Dr. Montezuma, who lived in Chicago, in order to provide Fay with a photograph for his collection. Folded in sixths for mailing. Near fine. [#003296] $650
NY, Harper & Row, (1981). The uncorrected proof copy of a compilation of pieces, many of them never collected before. Dampstaining to rear cover and the margins of the last few pages. Very good in wrappers. [#013881] $25
NY, Harper & Row, (1981). The uncorrected proof of this compilation of pieces, many of them never collected before. White was a longtime writer for The New Yorker, and his intelligent, humane and understated essays helped define that magazine's literary style over more than three decades, setting it apart from the other mass-circulation journals of its time. Fine in wrappers. [#016069] $50
NY, Holt Rinehart Winston, (1974). The first book by the author of the highly acclaimed Jerusalem Quartet. Fine in a near fine, spine-sunned dust jacket. [#019394] $25
NY, Alicat Bookshop Press, 1948. Alicat Chapbooks No. XII. Willeford's first book, a collection of poems, preceded only by a group of poems in broadside format, issued as part of another Alicat Press collection. These poems contain the only descriptions Willeford ever committed to writing of his experience in World War II, which, by the evidence included here and by comments he made to others about them, were apparently horrific. Acidic paper browning with age and some wear to spine; otherwise near fine in stapled wrappers. [#006648] $150
NY, Alicat Bookshop Press, 1948. Alicat Chapbooks No. XII. Willeford's first book, a collection of poems, preceded only by a group of poems in broadside format, issued as part of another Alicat Press collection. These poems contain the only descriptions Willeford ever committed to writing of his experience in World War II. Acidic paper browning with age and some wear to spine; a couple pages with 1" to 1-1/2" tears; about near fine in stapled, lightly sunned wrappers. [#002033] $125
NY, Random House, (1941). A play about a woman who sets up a school in a Welsh mining town. The play, with Ethel Barrymore, and the movie, with Bette Davis, were both highly praised. Williams was primarily known as an actor, and his career in the movies spanned six decades, from the early 1930s to the mid-1980s. Pencil markings in text making this a working copy (apparently belonging to someone playing either Miss Ronberry or Miss Moffat); near fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#015765] $25
(Norfolk), New Directions, (1956). A collection of poems by the author of A Streetcar Named Desire, The Glass Menagerie, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof and other modern classics of the theater. Fine in a very good, price-clipped dust jacket with a bit of sunning and a couple of small edge chips. [#016431] $125
Norfolk, New Directions, 1944. Near fine in a very good, evenly soiled, moderately spine-darkened dust jacket. A very early appearance by Williams, and a nice copy of a cheaply made book, manufactured to wartime production standards. [#011659] SOLD
NY, Hargail Music Press, (1947). Sheet music by Bowles for this Tennessee Williams poem. The two collaborated a number of times during the period prior to Bowles's first novel, The Sheltering Sky (1949), when his primary creative work was as a composer. Miller E40, approximately 1000 copies printed. Broadsheet, folded to make four pages. 9-1/8" x 12-1/8". Tiny corner chips and minor marginal dampstaining; very good. Scarce in the original, although apparently collected in the 1984 Soundings Press edition of Bowles' Selected Songs. [#017988] SOLD
NY, Scribner, (1984). Subtitled "A Journey to Navajoland," with illustrations by Navajo artist Clifford Brycelea. Winner of the 1984 Southwestern Book Award. Inscribed by the author in 1989: "For ____/ We are told a story/ and then we tell our/ own./ Bless you & these/ sacred lands." Pages 131-134 bear a small puncture wound, not affecting text; thus near fine in a very near fine dust jacket with slight rubbing at the edges. [#015426] $550
NY, Scribner, (1996). An advance reading excerpt printing two of the ten chapters from Quammen's ground-breaking volume focusing on "island biogeography in an age of extinction." This copy is signed by fellow author Terry Tempest Williams, who has added the note "For Comment." Dampstaining to lower edges, not affecting text; near fine in wrappers. [#015375] $50
NY, Marek, 1978. A review copy of the reissue of this novel of Leah, New Hampshire, the fictional town in which most of Williams' stories and novels are set, originally published in 1961. With a short introduction by the author for this edition. Two small sticker shadows on the front pastedown; else a fine copy in a lightly rubbed dust jacket. Williams was co-winner of the National Book Award in 1975 and was a longtime friend of, and influence on, such younger New England writers as John Irving and Andre Dubus. [#012092] $20
NY, Macmillan, 1961. A novel of Leah, New Hampshire, the fictional town in which most of Williams' stories and novels are set. Signed by the author in 1984. A fine copy in a price-clipped dust jacket with very light dust-soiling to the rear, white panel; else fine. A very nice copy of this novel by an author who was co-winner of the National Book Award in 1975 and was a longtime friend of, and influence on, such younger New England writers as John Irving and Andre Dubus. [#011350] SOLD
San Francisco, HarperSanFrancisco, 1993. The advance reading copy. A reflection on the Church, writing, and his own life. Fine in wrappers. [#017955] $20
NY, Harper & Row, (1973). A review copy of the author's first book, a suspense novel centered on a journalist in Vietnam. Fine in a near fine dust jacket worn at the spine crown with one tear at upper rear spine fold. [#014681] $20
NY, Harper & Row, (1975). The uncorrected proof copy of his third suspense novel set in Vietnam, and the least common of the author's novels. Fine in wrappers. [#014684] $80
NY, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, (1981). The uncorrected proof copy of this critique of modern architecture, in the same vein as the author's assault on Modern Art in The Painted Word. Publicity information stapled inside the front cover; else fine in wrappers. [#013887] $50
(n.p.), (Farrar Straus Giroux), (1973). The printer's sample pages. One sheet, folded in half, printing three pages of text, numbered pp. 3, 56-57, but with contiguous text; the fourth page lists type and setup specifications. Fine. Unusual publisher's ephemera of a sort that seldom reaches the market. [#013464] $50
NY, Simon & Schuster, (1969). His first book, a novel. Geoffrey is the older brother of author Tobias Wolff, and the two appear in each other's memoirs. Fine in a fine dust jacket, and signed by the author. [#016077] SOLD
NY, Harcourt Brace, (1923). The first American edition. Owner name on flyleaf; stray pen mark rear cover; some abrasion to spine label; modest general handling. About near fine, lacking the dust jacket. [#017634] $300
San Diego, Harvest/HBJ, (1985). The uncorrected proof copy of the first American edition. Fine in wrappers. [#018806] SOLD
Cambridge, University Press, 1945. A short critical introduction to Woolf's life and novels. Fine in a mildly spine-tanned, else fine dust jacket. [#018807] $25
Sydney, Cornstalk Publishing, 1927. The first Australian edition of this early book by Woolrich, published the year after his first book. In the 1940s and '50s, Woolrich, writing under his own name and also as William Irish and George Hopley, wrote some of the classic volumes of noir fiction of the era, a large number of which were turned into the movies that defined film noir and gave it its cultural importance and artistic stature. Foxing to pages, as is typical with this edition; minor spotting and fraying to the spine. Very good, lacking dust jacket. [#011666] $150
(Film)
NY, Lippincott, (1944). A collection of six stories including "Rear Window," basis for the classic Hitchcock film starring Jimmy Stewart and Grace Kelly. Also includes the story "Marihuana." A Queen's Quorum title, and a fragile wartime production, printed on thin, cheap paper. The first page of "Rear Window" (p. 145) has a hinge tear, affecting a couple of letters. Label remnants on front flyleaf; minor watermarks to lower rear board and lower corner of rear pages; a very good in a very good dust jacket with modest edge wear. A very presentable copy of one of the high spots of the mystery novel, according to "Ellery Queen." [#006782] $850
NY, Scribner's, (1983). Review copy of the author's first book, a highly praised novel -- "the chronicle of the corruption and decay of Spec 4 James Griffin under the pressures of an unreal war." Winner of the Maxwell Perkins Award. Near fine in a spine-faded, else fine dust jacket. [#010297] $25
Candia, John LeBow, 2000. A story by Yarbrough, with an introduction by novelist John Dufresne. The wrappered issue. One of 150 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine. [#016434] $25
NY, Knopf, 1999. The uncorrected proof copy of Young's posthumously published biography of Eugene Victor Debs. Fine in wrappers. [#018811] $20
NY, Horizon Press, (1968). Collected critical essays. Fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#009565] $20
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From the Libary of James Tate Rockwell Kent Archive