E-list # 147

Year-End Clearance

NY, Knopf, 1991. The advance reading copy of a novel told from the point of view of a Stradivarius violin. One light corner bump; else fine in wrappers, in a slightly worn publisher's cardstock box. Signed by the author. [#012309] $45
Ann Arbor, Bear Claw Press, (1976). An early collection by this non-Indian writer, which focuses on themes relating to the Plains Indians and Custer, and includes a section of translations by the author from Lakota. Near fine in wrappers. [#003011] $30
June 28 (1995). Agreeing to sign a book. Postal markings and a scrape that affects one letter; near fine. [#016276] $45
(New Orleans), B.E. Trice, (1997). The limited edition of this comic mystery set in South Florida, consisting of the sheets of the publisher's trade edition with an added colophon and a different binding. Of a total edition of 176 copies, this is number 65 of 150 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine in slipcase. [#011883] $70
Sag Harbor, Permanent Press, (1998). Well-received first novel, a Civil War story of a Union prisoner, which had a first printing of only 2400 copies and was reprinted several times very soon after publication. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#018927] $55
NY, A&W, (1978). A survey and analysis of contemporary dance by this prolific author. Small quarto, heavily illustrated with photographs. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with some minor edge wear. An uncommon book in fine condition. [#003014] $45
NY, Thomas Crowell, (1978). A novel about the Stephens and Catherwood trips through southern Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, and the Yucatan peninsula in the 1830s that rediscovered the ruins of the Mayan civilization, record of which had been lost to Europeans by the 19th century, and was entirely new to Americans. Their two books--Incidents of Travel in the Yucatan and Incidents of Travel in Central America, Chiapas and the Yucatan--were popular, colorful accounts that were also archeologically important for the highly detailed drawings Catherwood did of the ruins and glyphic writings of the Mayans. Signed by the author. Owner gift inscription on half-title. One corner bumped; very near fine in fine jacket. [#003016] ON HOLD
$45
Boston, New York Graphic Society, (1976). Highwater was one of the controversial figures among contemporary American Indian writers. Critics have claimed that he was not of Native American descent and that his claiming to be represented another case of exploitation of Native Americans -- in this case, Native American heritage and ethnicity itself, and the "authenticity" that comes with it -- by self-promoting whites. On the other hand, Highwater, who said he was adopted and that he did not know for certain his true parentage, wrote extensively on American Indian culture and was one of the most visible promoters of Native American interests. He won awards for his writing and his other works, including some from Native American organizations and tribes. His ethnicity may be uncertain, but he was one of the important contemporary literary voices dealing with matters of Native American culture and heritage. His writing was prolific, and his books -- on Native American painting, dance, and other subjects -- have filled voids left by other writers and have become landmarks in their fields. This title, Song From the Earth, an introduction to American Indian painting, and The Sweet Grass Lives On, a subsequent volume that introduced 50 contemporary American Indian artists, together helped launch the trend in collecting contemporary Indian art. A defining voice of our times, who helped bring many Native American issues into focus. Inscribed by the author. Near fine in a near fine, price-clipped dust jacket worn at the corners and spine extremities. [#016662] $100
Boston, New York Graphic Society, (1976). Highwater was one of the controversial figures among contemporary American Indian writers. Critics have claimed that he was not of Native American descent and that his claiming to be represented another case of exploitation of Native Americans -- in this case, Native American heritage and ethnicity itself, and the "authenticity" that comes with it -- by self-promoting whites. On the other hand, Highwater, who said he was adopted and that he did not know for certain his true parentage, wrote extensively on American Indian culture and was one of the most visible promoters of Native American interests. He won awards for his writing and his other works, including some from Native American organizations and tribes. His ethnicity may be uncertain, but he was one of the important contemporary literary voices dealing with matters of Native American culture and heritage. His writing was prolific, and his books -- on Native American painting, dance, and other subjects -- have filled voids left by other writers and have become landmarks in their fields. This title, Song From the Earth, an introduction to American Indian painting, and The Sweet Grass Lives On, a subsequent volume that introduced 50 contemporary American Indian artists, together helped launch the trend in collecting contemporary Indian art. A defining voice of our times, who helped bring many Native American issues into focus. Near fine in a near fine dust jacket with modest edge wear, particularly at the spine crown. [#016663] $40
NY, Harper & Row, (1981). Uncorrected proof copy. A discourse on the characteristics and components of an Indian aesthetic and perspective, which attempts to also define the differences between the "Western" world view and that of "primitive" cultures, particularly Native American. Highwater's thesis is that one of the great thrusts of the contemporary era is toward a fusion of the mentality of "primal" peoples with that of Western civilization, giving rise to a new perspective that transcends them both. It is borne out, he says, in many specific ways, such as the trend toward a postmodern aesthetic that challenges old assumptions about what constitute valid experiences. Small stain on foredge of pages, otherwise a fine copy in wrappers. [#003867] $45
(NY), HarperFlamingo, (1999). The uncorrected proof copy of this novel by the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love. Spine and edge sunning; near fine in wrappers. [#013654] $60
(NY), HarperCollins, (1995). An advance preview edition of the fourth book by this Pulitzer Prize-winning author, a novel of a man coming to terms with the death of his son. The copyright page would lead one to believe this issue was bound from sheets of the second printing; reportedly this is an error and the text does indeed precede the first printing and includes textual differences from the final published version. Clothbound, in a decorative cardboard slipcase resembling a gift-wrapped box. A fine copy, signed by the author on a tipped-in bookplate. [#011888] $45
Fremont, Sumac, (1973). Advance review copy of his third book, limited to 1026 copies. Near fine in a very good dust jacket. With jacket flap blurbs by Jim Harrison, Thomas McGuane, and Harry Crews. Inscribed by the author. [#012129] $45
Fremont, Sumac, (1973). Advance review copy of his third book, limited to 1026 copies. Fine in fine dust jacket and inscribed by the author, in 1974. With jacket flap blurbs by Jim Harrison, Thomas McGuane, and Harry Crews. [#008574] $70
NY, Random House, (1976). The uncorrected proof copy of his third collection of essays. Crown bumped and light creasing on the front cover; about near fine in tall wrappers. An uncommon proof, presumably done in small quantities and shot from galley sheets (the page numbers are reproduced in holograph). [#005202] SOLD
NY, Thomas Y. Crowell, (1960). The author's second book, a novel. His first, Cat Man, won the Houghton Mifflin Literary Fellowship Award. Hoagland has since become most well-known for his essays, particularly on natural history; John Updike called him the finest essayist of his generation. Pages unevenly browning with age, as two different paper stocks were used in production; trace foxing to the top edge; otherwise a fine copy in a near fine dust jacket with spots of rubbing to the edges and folds. [#013659] $150
NY, McGraw-Hill, (1965). A review copy of his third book, a novel. Slight foxing to top edge and verso of jacket; else fine in a fine dust jacket, with a letter laid in to Rust Hills, at that time with the Saturday Evening Post, presenting him with the book. [#011490] $70
London, Westminster Gazette, 1896. A collection of sketches that first appeared in the Westminster Gazette in 1894, the same year his hugely successful novel The Prisoner of Zenda was published. Inscribed by the author on the half-title. Descriptive label front pastedown; previous owner name and date ("Xmas/96") front flyleaf. Cloth worn at spine extremities, and several contact marks to front board; overall very good, without dust jacket. [#010666] $250
(Toronto), McClelland & Stewart, (1982). Uncorrected proof copy of her first book, winner of Canada's Seal First Novel Award. Light edge-soiling to lower front cover; else near fine in comb-bound cardstock wrappers. [#006426] $70
NY, Norton, (1992). Her highly praised first book, a collection of stories, one of which was selected for The Best American Short Stories 1990. The collection won the 1993 Western States Book Award. Slight bump to upper board; still fine in dust jacket. [#004649] $30
NY, Norton, (1992). The advance reading copy of her highly praised first book, a collection of stories and a surprise bestseller. One of the stories was selected for The Best American Short Stories 1990. A fine copy in pictorial wrappers. [#006427] $150
NY, Glenn Horowitz, 2001. One of 150 copies, this copy signed and additionally inscribed by the author "with all my love." Corner crease to the front flap; else fine in saddle-stitched wrappers. [#019688] $100
Berkeley, Rhymers Club, 1967. Handbill announcing a poetry reading by Hoyem at the University of California in Berkeley in May, 1967. Folded for mailing, with envelope. Fine. [#019183] $30
(Wounded Knee)
(Belmont), (American Opinion), (1973). An anti-A.I.M. offprint from American Opinion. Extraneous horizontal fold; near fine in stapled wrappers. [#016932] $45
NY, Norton, (1975). A review copy of this collection of poems of the American West, by a Montana poet whose poetry was twice nominated for the National Book Award, and who was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize in two different genres -- fiction and poetry. Hugo also became editor of the prestigious Yale Younger Poets series a few years after this book was published. This copy is inscribed by the author. Hugo's signature is uncommon. Spine-slant; else fine in a near fine dust jacket with a small tear at the upper rear spine fold, with publisher's review slip laid in. [#000170] SOLD
Smithtown, Exposition Press, (1983). A vanity press publication by a white writer, written for pre-teens. Despite the title, which seems thematically all-encompassing (albeit gender-specific), each chapter is actually a story about food, and the author includes an introduction for teachers stressing that the coming global food crisis can be averted by emulating some Indian practices. A fine copy in a heavily rubbed, very good dust jacket with tiny corner chips. [#016678] $100
NY, Arbor House, (1984). The uncorrected proof copy of this mainstream novel by the author of The Blackboard Jungle, who also writes a series of highly praised police procedurals under the name Ed McBain. This copy is marked "Press Copy" on the front cover and first leaf; spine-tanned; near fine in wrappers. [#017850] $45
NY, Scribner's, (1968). Her acclaimed and award-winning young adult novel. Owner name in pencil on front flyleaf; about very good in a dust jacket with substantial edgewear and thus only about good. Still, a scarce book. [#006169] $35
NY, Simon & Schuster, (2000). The uncorrected proof copy of this action novel by the bestselling author. Fine in wrappers. [#017468] $25
(NY), Morris Gallery, 1955. Unbound, untrimmed sheets of his second book. 500 copies were printed but many copies remained unbound and, like this copy, unnumbered. Although not called for in the edition, this copy is signed by the author. Fine. [#018933] $100
September 14, 1978. To the editors of Farrar, Straus & Giroux: "I'm taking the liberty of submitting to you a ms. of short stories, not mine, that I think is worthy of consideration for publication..." The author on whose behalf Ignatow is writing is unnamed, although he does add that Grace Paley is interested in writing an introduction. One corner staple; editorial "logged in" remarks; folded in thirds; and typed on a machine that made only partial "o's." Near fine. [#013665] $70
NY, Random House, (1998). The advance reading copy of the first American edition. Fine in pictorial wrappers. [#010873] $35
London, Hogarth Press, 1938. Autobiographical account of the author's early years in London. This is the first issue of the first edition, in blue cloth lettered in black. The total printing was 3580 copies. Very slight offsetting to front flyleaf; darkening to spine cloth; near fine, lacking the dust jacket. [#014509] $125
NY, Random House, (1998). The uncorrected proof copy of this collection of essays by the late political columnist and commentator. Near fine in wrappers with a crimp at the lower front corner. [#010878] SOLD
NY, Thunder's Mouth, (1988). Well-received first novel by an award-winning poet. This is an advance review copy. Fine in a very near fine dust jacket. [#010056] $45
Santa Barbara, Capra Press, 1979. One of the personal accounts of the war that straddles the line between autobiography and autobiographical fiction. The author served in Vietnam in 1969 and this, ostensibly, is an account of his time there and its effects on him afterwards. Very slight abrasion front flyleaf; else fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#010058] $30
NY, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, (1980). Folded and gathered sheets of this posthumous collection of Jarrell's essays and reviews, spanning the years 1935-1964. Edge-sunned, a little spotting and creasing to the last page; near fine. Jarrell, a poet and also the author of one novel and several children's books, was highly respected for his incisive criticism. A scarce advance issue of this collection. [#012861] $150
Chicago, Johnson Publishing, 1970. The first book by this African-American author, a collection of cartoons focused on issues of race. Johnson won high praise for his first novel Faith and the Good Thing and later won the National Book Award for Middle Passage. Only issued in wrappers, a fine copy. [#006437] SOLD
Amherst, University of Massachusetts Press, (1998). An advance copy of this volume of letters and diaries of the Mohegan preacher Joseph Johnson, 1751-1776. 8-1/2" x 11" sheets, printing two text pages to one photocopied page, Comb-bound in plain blue cardstock covers; fine. [#016694] $45
Washington, D.C., Agency for Int'l Dev., (1965). An excerpt from an address by Johnson to the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists at the White House on May 13, 1965. Johnson concentrates on the "hearts and minds" aspects of U.S. policy: schools built, textbooks donated, vaccinations administered, etc. Stamped "Library of Congress Surplus/Duplicate" on front cover; gouge to lower spine; very good in stapled wrappers. [#010060] $40
NY, Viking, (1967). Second printing. Inscribed by the author. Near fine in a near fine spine-darkened and slightly edge-worn dust jacket. [#010674] $30
NY, Holt Rinehart Winston, (1979). Uncorrected proof copy of her fourth collection of poetry. Name in marker half blotted out on front wrapper (presumably the reviewer to whom the book was assigned); overall very good and inscribed by the author "with love". [#001604] $55
NY, Holt Rinehart Winston, (1973). The uncorrected proof copy of her second collection of poetry. Jong's breakthrough novel, Fear of Flying, published the same year as this collection, redefined the parameters for acceptable commercial fiction in the wake of the newfound freedoms of the Sixties and the women's movement, so much so that its title became a byword, and a part of the vernacular of contemporary political discussion. Inscribed by the author. Fine in tall wrappers with review slip laid in. [#008584] $175
[NY], [Holt Rinehart Winston], 1975. A personalized advance copy of her third collection of poetry. Photocopied pages shot from an uncorrected proof copy, warmly inscribed by the author, and with one poem, "Advice to Myself After Losing My Wallet," crossed out, apparently by Jong. Together with an autograph note signed, on personal stationery, transmitting the sheets and thanking the recipient for some Nabokov books. All items fine in a torn, hand-addressed, postage due envelope. An interesting item from the author of the landmark novel Fear of Flying. [#015617] $250
Amherst, U. of Massachusetts Press, 1970. The softcover issue of this collection of poems, inscribed by the author to another poet in 1976. Fine in wrappers. [#011904] $80
Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1987. The uncorrected proof copy of this well-received novel. Fine in wrappers. [#017860] $30
(Oshkosh), (Starboard Publishing), (1990). "A Vietnam Medical-Military Adventure," the personal account of a doctor's year in Vietnam, in diary format. Heavily illustrated with his photographs, both black-and-white and color, plus evocative line drawings by Theodore William Gostas, identified as a "Combat Artist" and a POW in Vietnam, 1968-1973. This is an advance review copy, with a slip pasted to the inside front cover so indicating. Signed by the author. Quarto, softbound. Short crease to rear cover; near fine. [#010072] $70
(1980-1981). Three autograph letters signed (two on personal stationery; one written inside a card) to another writer, praising his recent story in The Atlantic and his current novel. Kaplan is especially taken with the Jewishness of the recipient's work: "I think it's very rare to find such a daring, honest, wonderful story that is a genuinely Jewish story in a national magazine. (First of all, I think very few stories of that description are being written)....you've captured an attitude, a spirit in this story that except for the very early immigrant writers (& some of them were primitive so not "art") that has been either unknown or buried in the mainstream of American Jewish fiction." All items fine. [#012866] $70
NY, Harper & Row, (1980). An uncorrected proof copy of the author's second book, first novel. Near fine in wrappers. Inscribed by the author and dated in October of 19 79, three months prior to publication. [#010677] $70
(Film)
NY, Harper & Row, (1975). The simultaneous issue in wrappers of this collection of film reviews, criticism and essays, 1970-1974. Inscribed by the author in the year of publication. Fine. [#014102] $40
Middleton, Wesleyan University Press, (1980). The author's first book, poetry in the Wesleyan series, this being the hardcover issue. Warmly inscribed by the author to his then-wife, the poet Ai (although the address used is "darling"). Fine in a very good dust jacket. [#012867] $100
NY, Atheneum, 1987. Uncorrected proof copy. Inscribed by the author, with "thanks for a stimulating morning." Short tear to upper front spine fold and small smudge to front cover; near fine in wrappers. [#010687] $45
Cambridge, Pym-Randall, 1968. Of a total hardcover edition of 400 copies, this is one of 90 numbered copies signed by the author. Oblong quarto; boards bowed, else fine in a sunned, near fine dust jacket. [#001614] $30
Cambridge, Pym-Randall, 1968. One of 600 copies in wrappers. Although not called for, this copy has been signed by the author. Near fine in wrappers. [#001615] $25
Cambridge, Pym-Randall, (1967). Of a total edition of 126 copies in wrappers, this is copy "H" of 26 lettered copies signed by the author. Fine. [#001610] $55
Los Angeles, Black Sparrow, 1968. One of 250 numbered copies in wrappers signed by the author. Fine. [#001613] $35
(Barrytown), Station Hill, (1979). One of 1474 copies in wrappers, of 1500 total, this one having been warmly inscribed by the author. Fine. [#001620] $45
(n.p.), Viking, (1988). Uncorrected proof copy of this historical novel by the author of the Pulitzer-Prize winning Ironweed. Near fine in wrappers, and signed by the author. [#010689] $70
(n.p.), Viking, (1988). Uncorrected proof copy of this historical novel by the author of the Pulitzer-Prize winning Ironweed. Fine in wrappers, and inscribed by the author. [#010690] $100
(NY), Viking, (1988). The uncorrected proof copy of one of Kennedy's Albany novels, this one set in the mid-19th century. Faint corner crease; else fine in wrappers. [#005240] $30
Larkspur, Jan Kerouac Benefit Fund, 1995. An attractive poster, designed and printed by noted poster artist Alton Kelley -- who designed many of the famous psychedelic posters of the 1960s in San Francisco. This poster was prepared to promote a series of benefits for Kerouac's daughter Jan, who, besides being quite ill and without health care benefits, was contesting the disposition of Kerouac's literary estate. A series of fundraising events were organized in San Francisco, which included appearances and performances by a number of people who had been closely connected to Kerouac and the poets and artists of the Beat generation and later the Sixties counterculture. Of a total edition of 1135, this is one of 1000 unsigned copies. Approximately 18" x 26". Rolled, else fine. [#017485] $30
London, Heinemann, (1944). Stories, with various themes, some of them, like the stories of Shirley Jackson, bordering on the supernatural. Bookplate front pastedown and pencilled ownership signature; otherwise about near fine in a very good, price-clipped and spine-tanned dust jacket with a couple water spots. A very nice copy of a fragile wartime book. [#013249] $175
(n.p.), Viking, (1987). The uncorrected proof copy of this collection of short pieces, both fiction and nonfiction. "Press Copy" markings to cover and summary page; one corner crease; near fine in wrappers. [#016287] $70
NY, Viking, 1986. A promotional flyer for an evening with Kesey, who was on tour with "The Thunder Machine Band" promoting his book Demon Box. Contains three previously unpublished and still-uncollected Kesey poems. A single sheet, folded to make four pages. Fine. [#011915] $40
NY, Trident Press, (1971). His fourth novel, fifth book. Inscribed by the author in 1972. Spotting to top stain, else fine in a very near fine dust jacket, with a crimp at the crown. [#008175] $70
NY, Atheneum, 1961. The first book to be published in the U.S. by this Irish poet. Winner of the Irish Arts Council's Triennial Book Award. This is the issue in wrappers; there was also a simultaneous hardcover edition. A near fine copy, and signed by the author. [#008179] $45
Boston, Godine, 1986. The first American edition of this collection of stories, published almost a decade after the original Canadian edition, and after the success of Shoeless Joe. Signed by the author. Foxing to top edge; else fine in a fine dust jacket. [#019535] $45
Port Townsend, Copper Canyon, 1984. The uncommon uncorrected proof copy of these "poems for women." Stapled sheets with a black tape spine. A low-tech production, suggesting very few were done. Kizer won the Pulitzer Prize the following year, for her collection Yin. Fine, with publisher's promotional sheet laid in. [#014851] $125
Bloomington, Indiana U. Press, (1961). The first regularly published book, a collection of poems, by a writer whose work is strongly associated with the Pacific Northwest and who later won the Pulitzer Prize. This is cloth issue, and is inscribed by the author to Oscar (Williams) "with love" in 1963. Williams is best-known as an anthologist but began by writing poetry: he won the Yale Younger Poets Award in 1921. A nice association copy of an important first collection. In addition to the inscription on the front flyleaf, Kizer has also added her contact information on the rear flyleaf. Fine in a near fine, spine-faded, price-clipped dust jacket. [#006460] $150
NY, St. Martin's, (1979). Seventh novel by the author of The Painted Bird, among others. This book was published just before the "scandal" broke wherein Kosinski was accused of letting his students or paramours ghost-write his own novels. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with one open edge tear down the front flap fold. Signed by the author. [#008601] $30
NY, St. Martin's, (1979). A special issue, number 466 of 500 numbered copies signed by the author. The signature is on the front flyleaf; the limitation is printed on the verso, giving the appearance of a somewhat impromptu limited edition. Fine in a near fine glassine dustwrapper with some chipping. [#010701] $60
NY, Random House, (1968). Kosinski's second novel, and second book published under his own name, after the highly acclaimed The Painted Bird. This title won the National Book Award. Poets House Library bookplate; else fine in a very good, spine-tanned dust jacket with a few red spots to front cover and gutter holes to rear cover. [#015630] $25
NY, Random House, (1968). Kosinski's second novel, and second book published under his own name, after the highly acclaimed The Painted Bird. This title won the National Book Award. This is presumably a review copy: "Courtesy of Antioch Review" stamped on front pastedown; else fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#015631] $60
NY, Random House, (1968). Kosinski's second novel, winner of the National Book Award. Owner name front flyleaf, else fine in a very good dust jacket with some abrasion and surface wear to the unlaminated jacket and very light chipping at the spine extremities. [#011518] $25
London, Bodley Head, (1960). The first British edition of the author's first book, a pseudonymously published nonfiction account of Russia in the postwar years, predating his first novel, The Painted Bird, by five years. Inscribed by the author as "Jerzy Kosinski" for Hugh Moorhead in 1982. Moorhead was a Philosophy professor at Northeastern Illinois University who wrote to 250 authors to ask them what they thought the meaning of life was, and then published their answers in a depressing book that suggested nobody had much of a clue. Stripe at bottom page edges; very good in a very good dust jacket chipped at the upper front spine fold. [#000989] $375
NY, Morrow, 1972. The first book in a trilogy set in the fictional Central American country of Tinieblas, a country very similar to Panama, where the author grew up. The trilogy, and this book in particular, was highly praised for its authenticity and insight. John Le Carre thanked Koster in The Tailor of Panama for helping him and providing him access as well as "wise counsel." Nominated for the National Book Award. Signed by the author in the year of publication on the front flyleaf. Lengthy gift inscription (in Panama, apparently) on the verso of the half title. Dusty top edge; else fine in a near fine, dusty and price-clipped dust jacket. [#010702] $125
NY, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, (1978). Very good in a very good dust jacket and inscribed. [#010703] $45
Venice, Legatoria Piazzesi, (1976). The author's first book, an excerpt from a novel-in-progress, with an introduction by Studs Terkel. An elaborately produced volume, bound in parchment and letterpress printed on mould-made paper, with an original signed drypoint by Krich bound in. Of a total edition of 170 copies, this is an unnumbered copy sent out as a review copy, with the publisher's review slip laid in. Spine-tanned; else fine without dust jacket, as issued. [#006462] $200
(Little Magazines)
NY, Swing, 1960-1961. Three issues of this small underground magazine devoted to writings and drawings by children. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#019201] SOLD
NY, Henry Holt, (1996). Advance reading copy of this somewhat unlikely bestseller. Fine in wrappers. [#007849] $30
Alondro, Henny Penny Press, 1956. Henny Penny Press Chapbook #1. Number 18 of an unspecified limitation. Larsen was a West Coast poet who was friends with Richard Brautigan, among others. Near fine in spine-tanned stapled wrappers with small organic abrasions to the rear cover. [#017135] $35
NY, Harper and Row, (1985). The first American edition of his first book, a highly praised collection of stories. Published in the UK as The Silver Age. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#014856] $30
December 14, 1986. A brief note to the editor of Art & Antiques magazine, congratulating him on a recent Wyeth issue. Folded for mailing, else fine, with envelope. [#016712] $45
Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1991. The advance reading copy of his second book, like his first an exploration of place but in this case, rather than an extended road trip, the author focuses on one small section of Kansas. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#016715] $70
NY, Weidenfeld & Nicolson, (1989). A review copy of his second novel. Signed by the author. Fine in a spine-faded; else fine dust jacket. [#012115] $25
NY, Knopf, 1984. The first book, a highly praised collection of stories, by the author of the controversial While England Sleeps, among others. This is the uncorrected proof copy. Light, faint staining to rear cover; near fine in wrappers. [#006469] $60
December 16, 1987 and August 19, 1992. In each letter, Leithauser updates the recipient on his life -- address change, teaching assignments, child expected, novels expected (Hence and Seaward, respectively). In each letter, he suggests the recipient attend a gallery showing of his brother's artwork. With an announcement of Mark Leithauser's January 1988 opening. One letter folded for mailing; one envelope included; fine. [#013709] $100
NY, Dial, (1968). A book for young adults that was a Newberry Honor book. A minor classic, and very scarce in the first printing. This copy has an ink initial on the front flyleaf and the half title; near fine in a very good dust jacket that is worn at the spine extremities and rubbed through at the spine folds. [#001232] $30
NY, Poseidon, (1982). First book, a novel about a long distance swimmer, which was nominated for a PEN/Hemingway award. This is the uncorrected proof copy. Fine in wrappers with publication date written on front cover and publisher's information sheet laid in. [#006473] $35
Undated. On Esquire notepaper. "Lucky you! Yeah, his King Kong business was falling-down funny. Love, Gordon." Folded once, paperclip imprint; else fine. [#013716] $70
(Fugitive Poets: MOORE, Merrill and DAVIDSON, Donald)
London, Oxford, 1924. A 1924 reprint of this 1798 volume of lyrical ballads, inscribed by Fugitive poet Merrill Moore to fellow Fugitive Donald Davidson. Moore has also written his own name and from whom and where and when he received the book initially. The rear pastedown has a note, in Davidson's hand ["The language of prose. 'The Female Vagrant.' 70"] about a verse on page 70 that he has marked with a marginal notation. A very good copy without dust jacket and a very good association copy between two of the most prominent figures of one of the major American literary movements of the 20th century. [#010526] $350
NY, Viking, (1975). The uncorrected proof copy of his first novel, winner of the Ernest Hemingway Foundation Award. Set in Vietnam in 1964 among a group of Green Beret advisors in a small Vietnamese hamlet. "Senior Center Library" stamps to all page edges; else fine in wrappers. The published price was changed from the price indicated on the proof. Not a proof we have seen often. [#010101] $150
(Hampton), Hampton House, 1971. Antiwar poetry illustrated by photographs from Wide World Photos of Vietnam war victims. Fine in stapled wrappers. Polemical, damning poetry ("...we who damn/and desecrate our country's name/with other patriots' blood...") Uncommon. [#010361] $40
Kansas City, Sheed Andrews McMeel, (1976). His first book, a collection of "narrative contemplations" of the desert, told in a poetic, lucid prose, the clarity and simplicity of which is uncommonly suited to the subtleties of perception and expression it contains. Inscribed by the author. A thin book, published by a small midwestern publisher more noted for its religious titles than its books for the general trade, this book has become quite scarce in recent years. Owner name on front pastedown; small spine bump; near fine in a very good, supplied dust jacket with light wear to the top edge and some shallow tactile water rippling. [#018950] SOLD
Athens, University of Georgia Press, (1997). A short story, attractively illustrated by Tom Pohrt, who also illustrated Lopez's Crow and Weasel. Signed by both Lopez and Pohrt on a Tom Pohrt-designed bookplate, laid in. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#015246] $45
NY, Random House, (1984). The uncorrected proof copy of this novel that was a surprise winner of the Pulitzer Prize. Near fine in wrappers. Uncommon. [#014541] SOLD
NY, Viking, (1973). The advance reading copy. Based-on-fact account of a New York City undercover cop who exposes corruption in the police force and is nearly killed for it. Spine-sunned and lightly creased; near fine in wrappers. [#014148] $40
Surrey, Sceptre, 1970. Subtitled "a funeral-song to America, for her negro dead in Vietnam." A rice-paper broadside, folded into wrappers. Of a total edition of 150 copies, this is number 50 of 50 numbered copies signed by the author on the wrapper. Fine in near fine wrappers, with a few light splatters on the rear cover. [#010363] $60
NY, Viking, (1974). Advance review copy of her first novel. Fine in fine dust jacket and inscribed by the author. [#011144] $40
(Port-au-Prince), (Imprimerie Renelle), (1956). A small, hand-printed volume by this Haitian surrealist poet, with a cover illustration and frontispiece by Milo Rigaud. Signed by the author on the front cover, with an additional full page inscription by the author to poet Barbara Howes on the first blank, written in 1964. Stitching absent; staining to covers; a good copy in wrappers, held together with a wraparound band addressed to Howes in Magloire-Saint-Aude's hand. An excellent literary association: not only was Howes a well-respected poet in her own right, who was twice nominated for the National Book Award, she also was editor of From the Green Antilles: Writings of the Caribbean, one of the first collections to bring Caribbean writing to a mainstream American audience. [#018561] $750
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Catalog 169