Weekly Sale

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Note: Sale prices are net prices -- no further discounts apply.

All books are first printings of first editions or first American editions unless otherwise noted.

(NY), Viking, (1972). An alphabet book, featuring pictures by Leonard Baskin and words by his wife, Lisa, and his children, Tobias and Hosea. Calligraphically inscribed: "For Pete & Oriole [Farb]/ with the affectionate regard of Lisa & Leonard. 1972." Also signed by Tobias and Hosea Baskin, (then 3 or 4 years old). Fine in a very good dust jacket with a bit of sunning and a couple short edge tears. Although Leonard Baskin was known to be generous with his signatures, this is doubtless uncommon signed by the three, especially with contemporary signatures. Winner of the Caldecott Medal. [#032740] $300
$195
(Colorado Springs), Gauntlet, (2006). A collection of the fictions that Bradbury wrote in the nine years prior to his classic novel of 1953, all of which contained some seeds or ideas that later composed the famous novel. Some of these stories have been reprinted many times, some only published once, and others were unpublished prior to this volume. A "Publisher's Copy" (PC) of the limited edition (750 copies) of Match to Flame, signed by Bradbury. Slight corner taps, else fine in a fine dust jacket. Issued together with The Dragon Who Ate His Tail, which here has the ownership stamp of another author inside the front cover and slight corner taps; very near fine in wrappers. [#032262] SOLD
1988. An original drawing by Wilson for Burroughs' 1989 book Tornado Alley. This image was included in the exhibition "Ports of Entry: William Burroughs and the Arts" that was mounted by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 1996, and it is reproduced on page 140 of the exhibition catalog. Interestingly, the illustration in the book does not show some of the work that Wilson did, as it was done using nonrepro blue pencil which does not show up when photographed: Wilson's edits didn't appear in Tornado Alley and they don't appear in Ports of Entry, but they are quite visible in the work itself. Wilson, one of the great artists of the underground comix of the 1960s and beyond, whom R. Crumb has said was a major influence on Crumb's own work, collaborated with Burroughs on a number of projects. This is not only a significant work of art, and a significant association with Burroughs, but it is also signed by Wilson, who has added, "To Nelson" next to his signature: Wilson gave this work to his friend Nelson Lyon, who loaned it to the exhibition and is listed in the book as one of the lenders to the exhibit. This is, in effect, a three-way association: Nelson Lyon was the co-producer of Burroughs' Dead City Radio, a 1990 album of Burroughs reading his work (including pieces from Tornado Alley) against a background of experimental music by various artists. 9-3/4" x 6-3/4". Matted and framed. Fine. A notable association copy, and an artifact of one of the great collaborations that Burroughs engaged in. [#028091] $7,500
$5,625
London, R. Daniel, 1655. Subtitled: "Of his Warres in Gallia; and the Civil Warres betwixt him and Pompey. Translated into English: With Many excellent and judicious observations Thereupon: As also The Art of our Modern Training, or Tactick Practice; Whereunto is adjoyned the Eighth Commentary of the Warres in Gallia; with some short Observations upon it. Together with the Life of Caesar, and an Account of his Medalls; Revised, Corrected and Enlarged." Folio, contemporary paneled calf rebacked and recornered with original spine laid down, five raised bands. Fourth edition of Edmonds' translation of Caesar's Commentaries, with additional engraved title page and 14 engraved plates (nine of which are double-page). Sir Clement Edmonds "had a high reputation for learning and as a writer on military art" (DNB); his translation of the Commentaries first appeared in 1600. "This excellent and well-known exposition of Caesar was always popular. The text is divided into short chapters with critical and explanatory notes to each" (Cockle 71). The lively plates depict the armies of Caesar in formation, in camp, in battles, in sieges, etc. With Hirtius' continuation. Hirtius, Roman consul and commander and friend of Caesar, serves with him in Gaul. Text embellished with woodcut initials, head- and tailpieces. STC C200. Plates fine. Some expert paper repair to first few leaves, index leaf provided in early manuscript. A very good copy in handsome contemporary calf. [#600004] $2,625
$1,969
(London), Serpent's Tail, (1997). The first book by this African American writer, a mystery novel. This British edition is the true first, preceding the American. Warmly inscribed by the author to a well-known poet with "much love, as ever" and signed "Charlotte." Carter has gone on to write a series of well-received mystery novels. Tiny ink dot to foredge; still fine without dust jacket, as issued. [#028402] $70
$35
Concord, Ewert, 1986. A collection of poems. Of a total edition of 136, this is one of 10 sets of advance sheets prepared by the publisher. Twelve 9" x 12" double flat gatherings printed on the rectos only, laid into a gray folding cardstock case, with a card laid in presenting the sheets with compliments, indicating the limitation, and signed by the publisher. A fine set of this rare advance issue. [#012110] $350
$228
NY, Knopf, 1998. The uncorrected proof copy of this novel that appears to be based on the life of folk rock singer John Denver, by a novelist who earlier wrote a book based on an Elvis-like character. Tiny corner gouge; else fine in wrappers. [#012208] $20
$10
NY, Simon & Schuster, (1979). Ms. Coppola's notes on the making of her husband's award-winning movie, Apocalypse Now. A diary of the production process, which was fraught with nearly as much drama as the movie itself. Remainder mark, a near fine, read copy in a very good, rubbed dust jacket with slight edge wear. [#028842] SOLD
1975. A letter dated January 27, 1975 and written to Paul [presumably Paul Williams, Dick's close friend and eventual biographer] transmitting chapter one of Confessions [of a Crap Artist] (not included here) and, included here, two pages of "theological ramblings" related to Dick's "beginning to fashion a scientific theory about [his] theological experiences..." The letter covers a bit about the retrograde forces such as tachyons bleeding back at Earth due to the weakening field of time; one of the two pages of notes considers humans' (and Dick's) roles as avatars, with knowledge received from the Holy Spirit; the other page considers our inability to recognize God and postulates a "SF novel: Hefestus as VALIS" -- a very early mention of the acronym Dick developed for the "Vast Active Living Intelligence System" that he considered to be the nature of reality and the universe, after his psychological/religious epiphanies that he experienced in February and March of 1974. The theological writings are from the early pages of what came to be known as his Exegesis, which, by the time of his death in 1982, had reached over 8000 pages of religious and metaphysical insight and speculation. The letter, signed by Dick, runs about 225 words; the theological musings about 950 words. Near fine. [#032866] $4,500
$3,375
NY, Henry Holt, (1993). A collection of stories. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#016615] $20
$10
NY, Knopf, 1998. The uncorrected proof copy of his last book, a collection of essays. Fine in wrappers. [#013584] $45
$23
Boston, Godine, (1983). Second printing of this novella and eight short stories. Signed by Dubus on the title page and additionally inscribed by him on the half title, in 1985: "For Carol/ and truly the times are not so bad for you have endured/ Love/ Andre." Foxing to edges of text block; near fine in a near fine dust jacket with one short edge tear, light rubbing to folds, and foxing to verso. [#029306] $100
$65
(San Francisco/Brooklyn), (McSweeney's), (2002). His second book and first novel, and the first of his books to be published by his own McSweeney's press. This is the true first, one of the 10,000 copies that state "First Edition" and were offered for sale only at the McSweeney's website. There were an additional 40,000 copies of the "first trade edition," which did not state "First Edition" and were offered for sale in bookstores chosen by Eggers. Fine without dust jacket, as issued. Together with a fine copy of a 2002 advance excerpt from the book in The New Yorker, entitled "Where We Were," with textual differences from the published version. [#032979] SOLD
NY, Atheneum, 1960. A collection of six lectures on "man's vision of nature and himself," by the author of The Immense Journey, among others. Inscribed by Eiseley to Hiram Haydn: "To Hiram Haydn/ beloved friend and distinguished editor/ from/ Loren Eiseley." Haydn had been Eiseley's editor and champion at Random House for The Immense Journey. From Gale E. Christianson's biography of Eiseley, Fox at the Wood's Edge: "Hiram faced us all down at the sales conference [by claiming] that The Immense Journey would sell forever. And that's what it promises to do. We all dragged our feet on it and we were wrong." When Haydn broke ranks with Random House in 1959 to help start a new publishing house with Alfred Knopf, Eiseley agreed to follow: in return Haydn told Eiseley he would name the new publishing venture Atheneum, after the Athenaeum Award Eiseley had recently won (for Darwin's Century, which had been published by Doubleday). Atheneum's first Eiseley publication was The Firmament of Time, which was a finalist for the National Book Award and won the John Burroughs Medal, the highest honor given to a book of natural history in the U.S. Mild dustiness to the top edge; a very near fine copy in a very good dust jacket with modest edge wear and spine fading. One of the best possible association copies of this book, which was a landmark in both the author's writing career and in the history of a fledgling publisher that went on to become one of the premier literary publishers in America. [#032766] $1,250
$938
NY, Harper & Row, (1968). A second printing of his first book, "a fictional memoir" and one of the defining books of the Sixties, which helped blur the line between fiction and nonfiction much the way the New Journalism of that era did. A finalist for the National Book Award, winner of both the William Faulkner Foundation Award for best first novel and the Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Foundation Award of the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, for a work that, while not a commercial success, was nonetheless "a considerable literary achievement." Made into a movie in 1972, which was a finalist for the Golden Palm award at the Cannes Film Festival. While Exley's book was not a bestseller at the time, over the years it has remained in print, been brought out in a number of different editions, and is widely viewed as a classic of the 1960s. Signed by the author. Very slight spine slant; near fine in a near fine dust jacket with a couple short tears at the crown. [#023413] $850
$595
NY, Little Brown, (2007). The advance reading copy of his first novel. A finalist for the National Book Award. His third novel, To Rise Again at a Decent Hour, was short-listed for the 2014 Man Booker Prize. Inscribed by the author in 2008. One page corner turned; near fine in wrappers. Uncommon in the advance issue, especially signed. [#031686] $200
$130
NY, Scribner's, 1923. A play by Fitzgerald, written at the height of his popularity and the last book he published before his masterwork, The Great Gatsby. As a play it was assumed to have a much smaller market than his novels and its first printing, 7650 copies, reflects that: by comparison, The Beautiful and Damned had a first printing of 20,600 copies. Attractive owner bookplate front pastedown; a fine copy, with the spine gilt still bright and the binding tight, lacking the rare dust jacket. [#027607] $450
$293
Elmwood, Raven Editions, 1988. One of only 14 presentation copies of this roughly 10,000 word essay on the arc of Ford's mother's life and their relationship, a shorter version of which had appeared in Harper's. Issued in a total edition of 140 copies, only 40 of which were hardbound: 26 lettered copies and 14 presentation copies. This, Copy No. 3 of the 14 presentation copies, is signed by Ford, and with a frontispiece by noted artist Russell Chatham, hand-shaded and signed by Chatham as well. Although not called for, this copy is signed twice by Ford, once on the colophon and once on the half-title. Designed and printed letterpress by Carol Blinn at Warwick Press. Hand-bound in quarter leather and decorated paste paper over boards. Nearly imperceptible bowing to boards; very near fine. [#028916] $2,000
$1,500
(Lon), Anthony Blond, (1964). Inscribed. The first English edition, Very good in dust jacket. [#010595] $20
$10
NY, Viking, 1960. First American edition. A collection of stories and a novella. Foxing to endpages; near fine in a very good, spine- and edge-faded dust jacket with a few edge tears. [#000925] $25
$13
(Dance)
NY, Da Capo Press, (1998). First thus: originally published in 1990 and republished here with one minor textual emendation. Inscribed by Gottlieb to a well-known film director. Covers splayed; near fine in wrappers. [#026728] $45
$23
Baton Rouge, LA State Univ. Press, 1991. A collection of stories with Vietnam and the war as the focus. Fine in a fine dust jacket. Jacket blurbs by James Lee Burke, Richard Currey and Lee K. Abbott. [#010017] $20
$10
Baton Rouge, Louisiana State University Press, 1970. Near fine in a very good dust jacket and signed by the author. [#001574] SOLD
Kansas City, Andrews and McMeel, (1989). Inscribed by Beahm. Bookplate of recipient inside the front cover; near fine in wrappers. With a typed letter signed by Beahm laid in. [#030349] SOLD
(Little Magazines)
NY, Swing, 1960-1961. Three issues of this small underground magazine devoted to writings and drawings by children. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#019201] $250
$163
Holyoke, MA, Crossroads, (1998). The limited edition of this collection of early detective stories by Lansdale and Shiner, originally published in the late 1970s and early 1980s, prior to the authors' first books, but not collected in book form before this. Of a total edition of 1126 copies, there were 1000 copies in wrappers, 100 numbered hardcovers in grey cloth and dust jacket, and 26 lettered hardcovers bound in full red leather. This is letter "X" of the deluxe edition of 26 copies, signed by Lansdale and Shiner. An extremely scarce issue of a scarce title. Both Lansdale and Shiner have had successful writing careers since these stories were first published: Shiner won a World Fantasy Award for his novel Glimpses, and Lansdale has won nine Bram Stoker Awards as well as an Edgar, among many others. The red leather is spotted at the edges, thus overall very good without dust jacket, presumably as issued. [#030746] SOLD
Santa Monica, Falcon Press, 1987. Third printing of this revision of the 1977 Exo-Psychology. Subtitled "A Manual on the Use of the Human Nervous System According to the Instructions of the Manufacturers." Another in Leary's volumes that attempts to make a "scientific" case for the insights provided by psychedelic drugs, and attempts to view those insights in the context of overall human evolution in a seemingly "scientific" manner. Inscribed by the author in 1993 with "thanks for the memories." Near fine in wrappers. [#027398] $100
$65
NY, Atheneum, 1968. A review copy of the first American edition. Inscribed by the author on the half title. Recipient's signature front flyleaf; trace sunning to board edges; else fine in a very good, lightly rubbed dust jacket with mild edge wear. A scarce early book by the Nobel Prize winner, and extremely uncommon signed or inscribed, especially as an advance copy. A nice association: the recipient was the organizer of a literary festival in which the author participated long before his Nobel Prize. [#029502] $850
$595
Baltimore, Cemetery Dance, 1999. Of a limited edition of 450 numbered copies, this is a Publisher's Copy ("PC") and is signed by the author. Additionally, inscribed by Lee and with an autographed note signed laid in, in part "no sex or violence, believe it or not!" The note has some edge wear; the book has the bookplate of another author on the front flyleaf and is fine in a fine dust jacket. [#030971] $125
$81
NY, Scribner, (1988). A collection of essays on "the bond between mankind and the land and man's heartbreaking betrayal of [it]." Inscribed by Lopez to a fellow writer in the field, "your support has made my road easier, my life richer - in simple gratitude" and signed "Barry." Dated in Lopez's home town, in February of the year of publication. Near fine in a near fine dust jacket with a short snag at the front spine fold. A very nice inscription and association. [#029938] $350
$228
NY, Holt/Macrae, (2010/2011). A year in the life of a naturalist / marine biologist. Winner of the Orion Book Award for 2012. Near fine in a fine dust jacket, with a Peter Matthiessen blurb on the rear panel. Unmarked, but from the library of Peter Matthiessen. Together with the advance reading copy, without the Matthiessen blurb, but with a signed note from the publisher, John Macrae, to Matthiessen laid in. Fine in wrappers. Also together with a copy of SGI Quarterly, a Buddhist journal, April, 2010, with an interview with Safina and an inscribed Post-It note from Safina to Matthiessen on the front cover: "Peter - Buddhism and the sea - right up your alley. Best, Carl." [#032444] $350
$228
London, Macmillan, (1969). The first British edition of this African-American author's first book, a collection of stories that defied the mold of late 1960s black writing by refusing to yield to the easy temptation to substitute political diatribe for literary accomplishment and postured anger for real, human feelings. McPherson's second collection, Elbow Room, won the Pulitzer Prize and together these two volumes stand as high spots of African-American writing of the postwar era. Fine in a very near fine, mildly dusty, price-clipped dust jacket The U.K. edition of this collection is scarce. [#006508] SOLD
(Boston), (Emerson College), (1990). A double issue on the theme of "Confronting Racial Difference," edited by McPherson and DeWitt Henry. Includes the text of McPherson's 1990 speech "The Done Thing." Inscribed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#022061] $40
$20
NY, Knopf, 1998. The uncorrected proof copy of this narrative in the form of a single long poem. Fine in wrappers. [#012373] $30
$15
NY, Reynal & Hitchcock, (1946). The author's first book, a collection of poems. This copy is marked "File Copy" on the flyleaf, title page and top page edges. Very good in a fair dust jacket with one long, internally-repaired edge tear. [#004773] $35
$18
Berkeley, Creative Arts Books, 1999. Fine in wrappers. With an autograph note signed laid in, in part explaining, "I wrote it to satirize expert witnesses but set it (for legal reasons) in an offshore republic." [#030085] $20
$10
(Greenfield), (Greenfield Review), (1973). A collection of poems. Cover illustration by Wendy Rose. An early book by one of the more important Native American poets to come to prominence in the renaissance of American Indian literature that took place in the Seventies. This is the second issue: tipped to the copyright page is an acknowledgement of previous periodicals where some of the work first appeared. Wrappers rubbed; very good. [#002558] $70
$35
(Milan), Leonardo, (1990, 1991, 1992). Three Italian editions of his fifth book, a collection of related stories that was first published in 1990. Each is signed by the author. The first edition is fine in a near fine dust jacket; the second edition is fine in a very good dust jacket with dampstaining to the crown; the third edition is fine in a fine dust jacket. [#019575] $300
$195
(n.p.), (n.p.), (n.d.). A broadside. Approximately 7-1/2" x 13". Matted. Fine. [#011107] $20
$10
Edinburgh, Salamander Press, (1984). His first book, a work of criticism that focuses on "the influence of scientific thought on Conrad's fiction," and is an outgrowth of his thesis "Changing Scientific Concepts of Nature in the English Novel, 1850-1920." Inscribed by the author: "To ___, who is loved by all the girls in the office, with a big hug from Redmond. October, 1997." Recipient's name front flyleaf; fine in a near fine dust jacket with wear at the spine extremities. A nice inscription in an uncommon first book. [#029528] $350
$228
Garden City, Doubleday, 1959. A wonderful association copy of her first book, a collection of stories, by a writer who helped define the role of women and politics in contemporary literature: engaged without being didactic, Paley focused on both the ordinariness and the wonder of everyday life. Inscribed by Paley to Jean Stafford and her third husband, the journalist A.J. Liebling: "To Jean & Joe -- Grace Paley." Like Paley, Stafford's greatest medium was the short story: her Collected Stories won the Pulitzer Prize in 1970. Paley's Collected Stories, which included stories from this title, was a finalist for both the Pulitzer and the National Book Award, 25 years later. Offsetting to the endpages; near fine in a very good dust jacket with spotting to the rear panel and rubbing to the folds. [#029162] $750
$525
St. Paul, Bookslinger Editions, 1981. An attractive limited edition of this story, one of 150 numbered copies. Signed by the author and additionally inscribed to Seymour Lawrence: "For the heroic Uncle Sam,/ intrepid publisher --/ love, JA." Clothbound without dust jacket; spine-sunned; near fine. [#004290] $375
$244
[London], (Sceptre), (2012). Two volumes: the first and second issue uncorrected proof copies of the true first (British) edition of Powers' highly praised first novel: winner of the PEN/Hemingway Award, the Guardian Book Prize, a finalist for the National Book Award, and one of The New York Times ten best books of the year. The first issue proof is shot from photo-reduced typescript, bound in light yellow wrappers with three blurbs on the rear panel, by Colm Toibin, Chris Cleave, and Philipp Meyer. Faint handling apparent to covers; very near fine in wrappers. The second issue proof is typeset, bound in medium yellow wrappers with a photo of the author on the inside front cover, two blurbs on the front cover and only one blurb (by Philipp Meyer) on the rear cover. Fine in wrappers, with publicity sheet laid in. [#032685] $350
$228
NY, Knopf, (1993). The uncorrected proof copy of the first American edition of this dark young adult novel that was later reprinted as The Butterfly Tattoo. Front cover spotted and with some scattered ink lines; only very good in wrappers. [#023043] $150
$98
NY, RH, (1973). Uncorrected proof copy. A collection of poetry by the author of Mumbo Jumbo and the editor of Yardbird. Near fine in tall wrappers and signed by the author. [#006636] $100
$65
NY, Norton, (1984). The author's first book, a novel of a medic in Vietnam, by a writer who served there in such a capacity. Title has offset from the jacket to the boards from sunning; near fine in a very good, scratched dust jacket with one edge tear. [#010195] $20
$10
NY, Random House, (1984). The uncorrected proof copy. Foxing to covers near spine; very good in wrappers. [#031319] $20
$10
(Shamal Books)
NY, Shamal Books, (1976-1978). Four of the first six titles published by Shamal Books, a publishing company founded by the Nuyorican poet, historian, and community activist Louis Reyes Rivera and his wife, Barbara Killens Rivera, daughter of African American novelist John Oliver Killens. Reyes was a key figure in the CUNY movement, a grass roots effort to make the City University of New York more responsive to minorities and the poor. Titles include: Poets in Motion, an anthology edited by Louis Reyes Rivera; Who Pays the Cost by Rivera; Nubiana Vol. I by B.J. Ashanti; and Nom Nomm Nommo by Zizwe Omowale-Wa-Ngafua. The latter is perfectbound; the others are in stapled wrappers; each is very near fine. Early books from a press that published for another two decades; an obituary of Reyes said he edited, translated or published over 200 books in his lifetime, many of them by Caribbean, African or African-American writers. [#031755] $200
$130
Athens, University of Georgia Press, (1998). First thus. Unmarked, but from the library of Peter Matthiessen. Fine in wrappers. [#032185] $20
$10
Indianapolis, Bobbs-Merrill, (1968). The galley sheets of this early play by Shepard, his first two-act play. Laid in are the galleys of Elizabeth Hardwick's introduction, dated 1967; Hardwick had reviewed the play for the New York Review of Books. At the time Shepard wrote La Turista, he was a member of the counterculture rock band The Holy Modal Rounders, which had a cameo appearance in the film Easy Rider. Shepard was nominated for an Academy Award for his role as test pilot Chuck Yeager in The Right Stuff; he won a Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1979 for Buried Child, and he won eleven Obie awards and was nominated for two Tonys, for Buried Child and True West. He received the Gold Medal for Drama from the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1992. Claspbound, printed on rectos only, front cover tanned and separating; rear cover has date and price and "DUPL NYPL." Front cover has the name of Paul Myers, curator of the Theatre Collection at the New York Public Library. Very good. A fragile and rare early state of this play by one of the most important playwrights of the latter half of the 20th century. The only copy of the proof we have seen. [#027093] $2,500
$1,875
(NY), Warner, (1992). The author's well-received first novel. Fine in a fine dust jacket and signed by the author. [#009498] $55
$28
Reading, Addison-Wesley, (1997). The advance reading copy of this collection of essays on the subject of privacy, by the daughter of Bernard Malamud. Fine in wrappers. [#004848] $20
$10
(San Francisco), (Four Seasons Foundation), (1963-1964). Three broadsides: Gary Snyder's Nanao Knows, Lew Welch's Step Out Onto the Planet, and Philip Whalen's Three Mornings. [McNeil A7.] Each reproduced by photo-offset from the author's own calligraphy and printed in an edition of 300 copies on the occasion of a reading by the three poets at Longshoreman's Hall, San Francisco, June 12, 1964. Each broadside is signed by its author. Snyder, Welch and Whalen first met when they attended Reed College, a progressive school in Oregon; the friends later became three of the most influential poets of the Beat generation. Don Carpenter, a friend of Richard Brautigan and an important figure in the Bay Area literary scene, organized the Free Way Reading with the three poets; Don Allen, another key figure in the Bay Area literary scene -- his nascent publishing company, the Four Seasons Foundation, would later publish both Snyder and Brautigan -- printed the broadsides to commemorate the reading. An important occasion, linking three key poets of their time. Welch disappeared in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada mountains in 1971; Snyder found a suicide note at his camp, but no body was ever found and his fate remains one of the mysteries of that time. Each broadside is 9-1/2" x 12-1/2", with a mild edge crease in the left margin that would disappear with framing; near fine. A nice set. [#031781] $1,000
$700
Springfield, Stevenson Campaign Headquarters, 1952. The transcriptions of 56 speeches given by Stevenson during the Presidential election season of 1952, beginning with his welcoming address to the Democratic National Convention on July 21, when he was speaking as Governor of the host state of Illinois and before he was drafted as the Democratic Party's Presidential candidate. The second speech here begins: "I accept your nomination and your program. I should have preferred to hear those words uttered by a stronger, wiser, better man than myself." 54 more speeches follow, all issued as news releases and most on Stevenson Campaign Headquarters letterhead. The final speech was given on November 1 (Election Day was November 4). Stevenson lost to Eisenhower, winning 44% of the popular vote but carrying only 9 states. A chronological record of Stevenson's entire first run for President: each release runs 3-10 pages, so hundreds of pages of Presidential politics from a half century ago, with equal opportunity to note how much things have changed and how much they have not. Photo-reproduced legal-sized sheets; minor edge wear; a few pages detached from corner staples; large coffee ring on the first page of the second news release. In all, a near fine lot, representing these speeches' first appearance in printed form. A number of them were published in book form by Random House prior to the 1952 election, with a Foreword by John Steinbeck. [#032678] $1,500
$1,125
Indianapolis, Bobbs-Merrill, (1951). Styron's first book, inscribed to the writer Jonathan Carroll: "with best wishes/ William Styron/ 27 September 1971/ (Twenty years, to the month, after publication)." The date is also nine years before Carroll's first published book, The Land of Laughs. Laid in is a typed note signed by Styron in which he agrees to the signing; based on the address, Carroll would have been an English teacher at the time, in North Carolina. The book is unevenly sunned on the cloth and bears a few small stains; very good in a jacket with modest edge wear including one edge tear, and a vertical crease to the spine; still very good. The note is folded, else fine, with a chipped mailing envelope included. A nice association copy of an important first novel. Forty years after this inscription, on the occasion of Styron's death in 2011, Carroll wrote a blog post on his website, referring to Styron as a "great American novelist." [#026147] $1,500
$1,125
(London), Andre Deutsch, (1963-1989). Thirteen first British editions published by Andre Deutsch, including: Bech: A Book; The Centaur; Couples; Marry Me; Midpoint; The Music School; Of the Farm; Picked-Up Pieces; Problems; Rabbit Redux; Rabbit is Rich; Self-Consciousness and Telephone Poles. Three have owner names; most have foxing to the edges of the text block; each is either very good in a near fine dust jacket or near fine in a very good dust jacket. Problems has a review slip laid in. Price for 13 volumes. [#030403] $300
$195
(Schenecdaty), (Union College), (1971). Printed as a special issue of The Idol and featuring the text of a conversation with Updike. 32 pages, fine in glossy stapled wrappers with a pencil sketch of Updike on the cover. This copy is inscribed by Updike. An uncommon piece, and scarce signed. [#031521] $375
$244
NY, Knopf, 1968. The first of his novels to be both a critical and a substantial commercial success. Inscribed by the author: "For ___ ___/ with every good wish in her new environs/ John Updike." Foxing to cloth and edges of text block; mild splaying to boards; very good in a near fine dust jacket that is also foxed, mostly on verso. [#030163] $450
$293
[NY], (Scientific American), (1969). The first separate edition of this physics-themed poem. One of 6200 copies printed as Christmas cards to be issued with W.H. Auden's A New Year Greeting (not present). 24 pages, illustrated. Fine in stapled wrappers. Lacking the cardboard sleeve that combined the two booklets, but in a custom three quarter leather clamshell case from the Praxis Bindery. This copy is inscribed by the author: "For ___/ Merry Christmas 1995/ John Updike [with a drawing of holly leaves and berries]." While the print run of this item was not particularly small, especially when compared with the many limited editions Updike has done, the nature of its distribution -- as a freebie to Scientific American subscribers -- suggests that most copies would have been lost or discarded. [#030850] $2,500
$1,875
Franklin Center, Franklin Library, 1997. The Franklin Library edition of this novel, which was initially published to mixed reviews: Margaret Atwood, in The New York Times Book Review, loved it; David Foster Wallace, a self-proclaimed Updike fan, wrote a scathing review of it in The New York Observer. Signed by the author, with a special introduction by him for this edition. Leatherbound, page edges gilt, with a silk ribbon marker bound in. Fine. [#013863] $125
$81
NY, The Smith, 1974. Inscribed by the author to Peter Matthiessen. Edge-sunned; near fine in wrappers. [#032224] $20
$10
(Edinburgh), Rebel, Inc., (1996). A collection of novellas by six Scottish writers, including Welsh, Alan Warner, and four others. Fine in wrappers. [#004911] $45
$23
Salt Lake City, Highland High School, 1973. Vol. XV, No. XV, covering the 1972-1973 school year at Highland High, when Terry Tempest (later Williams) would have been 17 years old. Includes two pieces by Tempest: "Brand X," a 150-word commentary on the packaging of political candidates, and "Creative Writing," a short paragraph explaining her craft, in which she takes "craft" literally by comparing writing to sailing. Tempest is also listed in the front under "Honors" as having "Publication in National Poetry Anthology," "Publication in National Essay Anthology," and "Utah Poetry Society - second place." An early appearance in print by an influential writer-environmentalist-activist: Williams has received a Lannan Literary Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Wallace Stegner Award, the Distinguished Achievement Award from the Western Literature Association, and many other awards, including those that recognize her social and environmental activism as well as those honoring her writing. Tall stapled wrappers, with a corner crease to the rear cover; near fine. [#030151] $350
$228
NY, Harper & Row, (1971). Inscribed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#020563] $25
$13
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Catalog 169 William S. Burroughs New Arrivals