E-list # 147

Year-End Clearance

London, Collins Harvill, 1989. The uncorrected proof copy of the first British edition of these posthumously published poems, many of them quite moving, and addressing his impending death quite straightforwardly, even bluntly, in his characteristic, plain-spoken manner. With an introduction by Tess Gallagher. Corner crease to front cover; near fine in wrappers. [#012741] SOLD
NY, New York University Press, 1970. The scarce hardcover issue of this uncommon volume, edited by Curt Johnson, publisher of the little magazine December, where some of Carver's earliest fiction was published in the 1960s. Includes "Sixty Acres" by Carver, his second story to be anthologized (Stull B2). Also includes work by Joyce Carol Oates and the first work of fiction by Rick DeMarinis, among others. Near fine in a very good, rubbed, price-clipped dust jacket. [#012680] SOLD
Concord, Ewert, 1986. A collection of poems. Of a total edition of 136, this is one of 10 sets of advance sheets prepared by the publisher. Twelve 9" x 12" double flat gatherings printed on the rectos only, laid into a gray folding cardstock case, with a card laid in presenting the sheets with compliments, indicating the limitation, and signed by the publisher. A fine set of this rare advance issue. [#012110] SOLD
(West Hartford), (U. of Hartford), (1988). A photocopy of the original typescript of the speech Carver gave when he received an honorary Doctor of Letters degree at the university. The speech is transcribed in the program of the Commencement (a copy of which is included here). The typescript differs from the published version in paragraphing and in the deletion of one 17-word clause, which has been circled in ink on the photocopy -- thus providing an earlier view of the text of the speech. A rare ephemeral piece. The typescript is near fine; the program is fine. [#004067] $350
NY, Random House, (1986). The uncorrected proof copy of his second major collection of poems. Near fine in wrappers. [#011391] $100
NY, Atlantic Monthly, 1988. The definitive collection of his fiction, published just before he died and containing therefore the "final" versions of a number of his most important and frequently anthologized stories, as well as seven stories previously uncollected. This is the uncorrected proof copy of the trade edition, which was preceded by the Franklin Library edition. Lip print on the epigraph page; first leaf loosening; one short and unnecessarily glued edge tear to front cover. Overall, still near fine in wrappers. [#004064] $125
One of 15 tear sheet reprints of an offprint from Studies in Short Fiction, Vol. 25, No. 4, 1988. The cover reproduces the table of contents rather than adding a typeset cover with title and author. Signed by Stull. Stapled; fine. [#019153] $125
NY, Atheneum, 1977. Uncorrected proof copy of his highly praised first book, which was called by The New York Times Book Review "the best novel of the year." Casey's third book, Spartina, won the National Book Award. Erasure abrasion on front cover, and a small surface gouge on (blank) rear panel; otherwise fine. An auspicious debut. [#006300] $100
NY, Knopf, 1979. Uncorrected proof copy of his second book, a highly praised collection of stories. Laid in are two pages of publisher's promotional material, with review excerpts from Casey's first novel, including a John Irving blurb. Fine in tall wrappers, with a label pasted over bottom edge of pages. [#005033] $100
NY, Knopf, 1979. A review copy of his second book, a highly praised collection of stories. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#014717] $25
NY, Simon & Schuster, (1974). The uncorrected proof copy of Castaneda's fourth book in the influential series that began with The Teachings of Don Juan. Castaneda's books were published as nonfiction -- first person accounts of his extraordinary experiences with a Yaqui Indian shaman in Sonora, in northern Mexico. Later they were shown to have been largely or wholly fictional accounts derived from the author's readings and, presumably, his own use of hallucinogenic drugs similar to the ones he ascribes to Don Juan. Notwithstanding their fictional nature, they were and continue to be influential for having initiated a dialogue not only about cultural authenticity but also about the coherence of spiritual and mystical traditions in Native American and Mesoamerican cultures; in effect the books comprised, at the least, a critique of the cultural bias in traditional anthropology and helped usher in a new degree of critical thinking about such issues, a new sensitivity to cultural diversity grounded in that critical thinking, and also what became known as the New Age movement. Padbound proof; fine in tall wrappers. Scarce. [#019794] $300
Binghampton, Bilingual Press, (1986). The first novel (after several poetry books) by the author of My Father was a Toltec. An epistolary novel for which the author proposes three different routes through the text, none of them in strict conformance with a straight reading. Inscribed by the author to the poet Ai in 1987, in part: "As someone once said to Walt Whitman in a dedication, 'from a less poet'." This is the simultaneous issue in wrappers; tiny foredge nick, else fine. A nice association copy of an uncommon book. Ai won the National Book Award for Vice. [#011725] $250
NY, Atlantic Monthly Press, (2000). The advance reading copy of this collection of selected letters and nonfiction, 1909-1959. Tiny bump to crown; else fine in wrappers. [#018570] $45
NY, Random House, (1974). Uncorrected proof copy of this collection of poetry, her first book. Signed by the author. Publisher's ink comments crossed out in pencil on front cover; else near fine in tall wrappers. [#001343] $70
New Haven, Yale University Press, 1968. Review copy of the hardcover issue of this volume in the Yale Series of Younger Poets. Inscribed by the author in 1976. Cloth splattered with tiny ink dots; hence very good in a very good dust jacket with publication information written on front panel. [#001344] $25
Franklin Center, Franklin Library, 1987. By general consensus, Chatwin's best book -- a "novel of ideas," as the publisher puts it, of Australian aborigines, and the questions about man that arise from the vast gulf that separates the culture of contemporary, Western civilized man from that of the wandering tribes of Australia, whose "dream tracks" or "songlines" delineate both a physical and a psychic geography. The correct first American edition, published by the Franklin Library for subscribers as part of their Signed First Editions series. An attractively designed book, in black leather stamped in brown and gold, in a pattern suggestive of the Australian aborigines' "songlines" that give the book its title. With a special introduction for this edition, which does not appear anywhere else. Signed by the author. Chatwin's signature is uncommon; reclusive while alive, he died three years after the publication of this book, at the age of 49. Fine, in the publisher's original shrinkwrap. [#004547] $70
(London), Picador, (1998). The advance reading copy of this highly praised novel by a young Indian writer whose first book was shortlisted for the Guardian Fiction Prize in 1991. Fine in wrappers. [#014415] $30
(Tucson), University of Arizona Press, (1966). A study of the impact of the horse on Navajo and Apache folklore, illustrated with black-and-white drawings by Ted DeGrazia, a student of both Jose Orosco and Diego Rivera, and with color illustrations of horses by four Native artists -- Adee Dodge, Andy Tsinajinie, Harrison Begay and Beatien Yazz. This is a complimentary copy with a slip from the publisher laid in, inscribed by the author for Edward Tripp, the longtime editor-in-chief of the Yale University Press: "This copy is for/ Edward Tripp,/ And it is inscribed on the happy birthday/ of the horse - October 23, 1966 - at DeGrazia's/ Gallery of the Sun, Tucson, Arizona,/ With my best wishes/ LaVerne Harrell Clark." Large quarto. Foxing to top edge; else fine in an all-but-edge sunned dust jacket with a couple small tears; about near fine. An interesting volume, heavily illustrated and with images of horses from some of the highly regarded Native artists of the 20th century. [#016587] $175
Indianapolis, Bobbs-Merrill, (1976). His first novel. Fine in fine dust jacket and signed by the author. [#012126] $25
(London), Deutsch/Rapp and Whiting, (1973). Review copy of the British edition of this collection of short stories and dialogues. Fine in near fine dust jacket. Inscribed by the author: "Dear ____/ This book has/ lousy misprints/ in it, damn it./ (But not my fault.)/ Regretfully,/ Marvin Cohen." [#010512] $40
April 18, 1986. Written to the editor of Art & Antiques, declining to write an article and invoking "Sad Rule One: the more exalted, lavishly handsome the purpose of a magazine, the less it pays contributors." Signed "R." Folded once vertically for mailing; else fine, with envelope. A short note very much in keeping with the wry spirit of much of Condon's fiction. [#015525] $70
New Orleans, B.E. Trice, 2001. A limited edition of Connelly's novel, which features Harry Bosch and Terry McCaleb, the protagonist of Blood Work. One of 400 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine in slipcase. [#017761] $150
London, Dent, 1925. A novel that was unfinished at the time of Conrad's death and was published posthumously. Offsetting to endpapers, spotting to pages edges; very good in a very good, internally tape-repaired jacket. [#011414] $150
London, Fisher Unwin, (1923). Slight offsetting to front endpapers; cover gilt uniformly faded; very good in a very good, price-clipped dust jacket with a tear at the upper front panel. Still, an attractive copy of his last major novel completed before his death. [#011411] $150
(NY), HarperCollins, (1999). The uncorrected proof copy of the first American edition of this novel by one of the leading writers of historical fiction in the vein of Patrick O'Brian's acclaimed Aubrey-Maturin series. Fine in wrappers. [#015534] $30
NY, Harper & Row, (1987). The uncorrected proof of the first American edition of his first book, a collection of related stories that won the Whitbread Prize, the David Higham Prize for Fiction, and the Guardian Fiction Prize. An auspicious debut. Fine in wrappers. [#014779] $100
NY, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1997. The uncorrected proof copy of the first American edition of this novel, a rendering of Jesus' 40 days in the desert, along with a group of eccentric Bedouins. Shortlisted for the Booker Prize and winner of the Whitbread Award. Fine in wrappers. [#009257] $45
NY, Morrow, 1968. His first novel, which had a first printing of only 4000 copies. Crews resuscitated the Southern gothic tradition in the late 1960s and 1970s, picking up the mantle from such writers as Flannery O'Connor and, earlier, William Faulkner. His string of novels that includes Karate is a Thing of the Spirit, Car, Naked in Garden Hills, This Thing Don't Lead to Heaven, The Gypsy's Curse, and others defined a sensibility at once rough-edged, sad, and hilarious -- steeped in the comic and grotesque tradition that had permeated southern fiction and had given it its distinctive flavor. Signed by the author in 1969 at Bread Loaf Writer's Conference. Fading to pastedowns, as is typical for this title; small label partially removed from front flyleaf; near fine in a fine dust jacket. A nice copy of the first book by one of the unique voices in American fiction. [#019439] $1,250
NY, Harper & Row, (1988). The uncorrected proof copy of this novel about a boxer, which combines the toughness and sweetness, as well as the humor, that Crews was known for. This is the first issue, shot from typescript and paginated to 382. Fine in yellow wrappers. [#005066] $150
NY, Harper & Row, (1988). Uncorrected proof copy of this novel about a boxer, which combines the toughness and sweetness, as well as the humor, that Crews was known for. This is the second issue of the proof, typeset and paginated to 247. Fine in tan wrappers. [#005067] $45
San Francisco, 1981. Owner signature, and lacking the addenda sheet; else fine in stapled wrappers. [#011791] $30
Waco, Motive, 1946. An influential essay by this poet and critic, who was an early and longtime friend of Henry Miller and various other literary and artistic figures. Inscribed by the author in 1952 to Mary Shore, a painter and friend of Charles Olson. Near fine in stapled wrappers and a very good, dampstained dust jacket with two small holes on the rear panel. [#016169] $125
NY, Knopf, 1987. The uncorrected proof copy. A combination adventure novel/techno-thriller. Fine in wrappers. [#011420] $45
Ontario, CA, Silhouettes Press, (1936). Laid in is a sheaf of typescript poems by the author, with holograph annotations by her. Very good without dust jacket (as issued?) and inscribed by the author. [#010520] $40
Norwalk, Easton Press, (2000). The limited edition of the third book in the ambitious tetralogy that began with Aegypt, which was selected as one of David Pringle's 100 best fantasy novels of all time. Both Aegypt and the second volume of the tetralogy, Love and Sleep, were nominated for the World Fantasy Award. Issued in an edition of 1000 numbered copies, this is an out of series author's copy signed by Crowley. Leatherbound, all edges gilt, with a silk ribbon marker bound in. Fine. [#018870] $100
NY, Simon & Schuster, (1994). Her well-received second book, and first collection of stories, which were written and published over a span of more than 35 years. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#017775] SOLD
Austin, U. of Texas, (1965). Poetry. One of only 1000 copies. With a foreword by Allen Tate. Fine in a near fine, spine-tanned dust jacket. [#012766] $30
Chicago, Poetry, 1953. Warmly and lengthily inscribed by Dahlberg at his contribution, "Ushant, A Long Lotus Sleep," an excerpt from a work-in-progress. Near fine in wrappers. [#017387] $125
NY, Crowell, (1976). The last book published in his lifetime by one of the great American men of letters, whose career spanned generations and linked a wide variety of the strands of American literature: he was arrested as a Communist with Nathanael West in 1934; he formed a close friendship with Charles Olson; his writing was included in the suppressed issue of Big Table magazine, along with Kerouac, Burroughs and Corso, and he later became friends with Allen Ginsberg. This copy is inscribed by the author in the year of publication: "For my very dear Friend, ____/ with much love, and always/ gracious thanks 'forevermore/ the exchequer of the poor.'/ Devotedly,/ Edward." Several page corners turned; else fine in fine dust jacket. [#012769] $100
(Norfolk), New Directions, (1957). A collection of short aphoristic texts, with drawings by Ben Shahn. The first part is devoted to the Western cultural tradition, and the second focuses on pre-Columbian America, ultimately fusing the two to reach for a unified vision of the American cultural legacy. Fine in a near fine, sunned dust jacket. [#012762] $30
London, Calder & Boyars, (1970). The first British edition of this collection of short aphoristic texts, with drawings by Ben Shahn. The first part is devoted to the Western cultural tradition, and the second focuses on pre-Columbian America, ultimately fusing the two to reach for a unified vision of the American cultural legacy. Fine in a fine, price-clipped dust jacket. [#012763] $30
(Pittsburgh), U. of Pittsburgh Press, (1984). A collection of poetry that won the 1983 Agnes Lynch Starrett Poetry Prize. This is the simultaneous issue in wrappers. Signed by the author and additionally inscribed to another poet in the year of publication. Fine. [#011797] $70
Washington, D.C., Counterpoint, (1997). The uncorrected proof copy of this collection of stories culled from his earlier, now out of print, collections. With a previously unpublished postscript by the author. Front cover splayed; else fine in wrappers. [#010801] $30
Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1924. First book by one of the important members of the Fugitive group and co-founder of the Fugitive magazine. Neat label removal abrasion on rear endpaper; else fine in decorated boards, without dust jacket. [#001365] SOLD
NY, Norton, (1999). The advance reading copy of the first American edition of this novel that is billed as "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest originality mixed with the divine audacity of William Burroughs and Irvine Welsh." Fine in wrappers. [#018056] $40
NY, Knopf, 1993. The author's highly praised second novel, after the Kafka Prize-winning Labrador. This copy has been inscribed by the author to the novelist Margaret Atwood, whom she calls "inspiration and mentor," in the year of publication. Fine in a fine dust jacket. A nice association copy. [#008079] $100
NY, Morrow, 1979. Uncorrected proof copy of this humorous first book, which became something of a cult novel; published as Morrow's first paperback original, in addition to having had a small hardcover printing. Fine in wrappers, with publisher's letter laid in. [#006324] $45
March 1, 1987. 5-1/2" x 8". A short note to another writer, lamenting a missed chance both to meet and to publish a piece in a literary magazine. Fine. [#012773] $30
(London), Macmillan/Picador, (2001). The advance reading copy of the British edition. With the publisher's bookplate signed by the author laid in. Fine in wrappers. Uncommon with signature. [#018576] $125
NY, Knopf, 1987. The uncorrected proof copy of his first play, in which the figure and ground of unreality and reality repeatedly reverse. Originally published in American Theater in 1986. Small edge tear to upper edge front cover; else fine in wrappers. [#004577] $55
NY, Knopf, 1922. Advance review copy of the author's first novel. With review slip laid in and contemporary review pasted to the front endpaper. Beneath the review, the author has written "Approved!" and signed his name. Near fine in very good dust jacket. [#010534] $45
Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1940. The first book by the longtime New Yorker humorist. Warmly inscribed by the author, "recalling a most delightful and all too brief vacation," and signed "Peter." Top stain faded and a bit of play to the binding; still a near fine copy in a very good dust jacket chipped at the spine ends and with the pink faded from the spine. The book and jacket are illustrated by Charles Addams, who later gained fame as creator of "The Addams Family"; this is a very early appearance of his artwork. An uncommon first book, especially scarce signed. [#012231] $650
NY, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, (1981). A unique set of publisher's materials for her well-received first novel, winner of the short-lived National Book Award for best first novel. Printer's blues; two sets of long galley sheets; three copies of the dust jacket (folded flat); mock-up of binding. One jacket creased; else all items fine. Presumably this would have been the only such set generated, for the publisher's own internal use. [#019676] $200
NY, Villard, (1987). The advance reading copy of this "sweeping saga" of Vietnam "from the...French occupation to the...American invasion." Basis for the movie, which won an Academy Award for Best Foreign Film. Small split at base of spine and rear cover; near fine in wrappers. [#013979] $30
NY, Knopf, 1983. The uncorrected proof copy of the author's well-received first book, a novel. Dickinson received a notable degree of celebrity when the New Yorker profiled him as the prototypical "starving writer"--documenting the difficulties and exigencies of the writing life, even for a writer as critically acclaimed as Dickinson. Fine in wrappers. [#013165] $60
Providence, Burning Deck, (1974). One of 300 copies. Inscribed by the author in 1978. Fine in self-wraps. [#001381] $30
NY, Knopf, 1999. The uncorrected proof copy of this novel by a prolific and critically acclaimed writer who, perhaps because his work defied traditional categories and genres, was called "the most formidably gifted unfamous American writer." Fine in plain printed wrappers, with cover art bound in. [#013577] $35
Boston, Godine, (1977). Attractively printed and bound collection of stories. One of 200 numbered copies signed by the author. Spine cloth faded with mild dampstaining at the base; near fine in slipcase. [#008511] SOLD
Santiago, Nascimento, 1960. An early collection of short stories, the fourth book by this Chilean writer, which was not translated into English or published in the U.S. for 17 years. This book precedes any publication of Donoso's work in the U.S. by five years. Pages browning with age but still near fine in self-wraps. A scarce volume, given the Chilean imprint, the fragile binding and the cheap, acidic paper used in production. [#013579] $350
Barcelona, Seix Barral, (1973). "Three bourgeois novels" by this Chilean writer, one of which was the basis for Luis Bunuel's classic film The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie, which won an Oscar for Best Foreign Film. Published in the U.S. as Sacred Families: Three Novellas. Donoso is also noted for his critical study of Latin American literature, which both defined and helped create the boom in Latin American literature that brought an entire new pantheon of South American writers into the forefront of world literature. Inscribed by Donoso. Very good in self-wraps. [#013580] $175
NY, HarperCollins, (1994). A collection of essays. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#017801] SOLD
NY, Hyperion, (1996). His third book for young people, set in 16th century America. Lightly bumped; else fine in a fine dust jacket and signed by the author. [#002327] SOLD
NY, Harper & Row, (1989). Advance reading copy of this well-received and award-winning account of his family's ongoing struggle to raise an adopted child afflicted with fetal alcohol syndrome. Introduction by Dorris's wife, writer Louise Erdrich. This book, and the television movie based on it, helped raise public consciousness of the damage caused by fetal alcohol syndrome, and the widespread nature of the problem on Indian reservations. Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Heartland Prize and the Christopher Award. Fine in wrappers. [#003841] $35
(Biloxi Language)
Washington, Government Printing Office, 1912. Bulletin 46 of the Smithsonian Institution's Bureau of American Ethnology. Includes Biloxi-English and English-Biloxi dictionaries, and Ofo-English and English-Ofo dictionaries, plus a number of Biloxi texts and phrases, with their accompanying translations. A very good copy without dust jacket (likely as issued). [#002854] $25
Boston/NY, Houghton Mifflin, 1998. The uncorrected proof copy of his second novel. Fine in wrappers. [#014786] $40
NY, Norton, (1991). Signed by the author and additionally inscribed to a well-known poet in the year of publication. The recipient has made a number of marginal markings on the contents page, otherwise fine in a fine dust jacket. A good association copy. [#013174] $80
Boston, Godine, (1991). The uncorrected proof copy of this well-received collection of essays, Dubus' first book of nonfiction. With an introduction by Tobias Wolff. Near fine in wrappers. [#005104] $45
NY, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, (1979). The uncorrected proof copy of this anthology of baseball fiction, including Dubus' previously unpublished story "The Pitcher." Fine in tall wrappers. [#016178] SOLD
(n.p.), Stuart Wright, (1984). His first limited edition, a single story issued in an edition of 200 copies. Dubus was a contemporary master of the short story form and the most accomplished writer of novellas in the U.S.; he was compared on numerous occasions to Chekhov. Signed by the author. Clothbound, with paper spine label, issued without dust jacket. Covers splaying, as is common with this title; spine label faded; near fine. [#007359] $125
NY, Knopf, 1998. His last book, a collection of essays. Signed by the author on a tipped-in leaf. Fine in jacket. [#019170] $100
NY, Knopf, 1998. The uncorrected proof copy of his last book, a collection of essays. Fine in wrappers. [#013584] $45
NY, Dial, 1967. His first book, and his only novel -- a military tale not unlike William Styron's book The Long March -- a story of the peacetime military and the challenges to manhood and honor that its rigid code of morals creates. Dubus was once quoted as saying that after he wrote this novel someone introduced him to Chekhov's short stories, and he threw away the manuscript of what was to be his next novel and began writing short fiction -- of which he became one of our most acclaimed and accomplished practitioners. This copy is stamped "Sale" on the front flyleaf, but is otherwise fine in a fine, price-clipped dust jacket with a speck of rubbing on the rear panel. A very sharp copy of a book that seldom turns up in this condition. [#013582] $500
NY, Norton, (1994). His highly praised second book, first novel. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket with an "autographed" label on the front panel and an antitheft device on the verso. [#011814] $35
Santa Barbara, Santa Teresa Press, 1990. The screenplay for the award-winning film directed by John Ford. How Green Was My Valley won five Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director. This edition includes the screenplay and a lengthy essay by Dunne on the making of the film. Illustrated with stills from the movie and signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#010561] $40
NY, Dutton, 1960. A review copy, so stamped on the front flap. Near fine in very good dust jacket with several edge tears, a bit of paint on the front flap, and heavy rubbing on the spine. [#017080] $25
January 20, 1980. A short note submitting a story for publication. Slight corner crease, not affecting text; else fine. [#012784] $45
NY, Harper & Brothers, (1956). Bound galleys of Eastlake's first book, the first novel in what became (with The Bronc People and Portrait of an Artist with Twenty-Six Horses) his Bowman Family Trilogy. This copy was sent to Paul Bowles: a letter laid in from an editor at Harper's announces the book and solicits comments from Bowles. 6-1/2" x 11-7/16", printed on rectos only and perfectbound in plain wrappers with a label partially removed from the front cover. In a custom clamshell case. A very near fine copy of a scarce proof, dating from an era in which the production of bound proof copies was the exception, not the norm: this is the only copy we've ever seen. With notable provenance, having come from Paul Bowles's library, and with textual differences from the published book. [#016192] $1,500
(Stafford), Northwoods Press, (1980). Poetry about the war. This is the issue in wrappers. Rubbed; near fine. [#010353] $40
(Stafford), Northwoods Press, (1980). Poetry about the war. This is the issue in wrappers. Owner name. Rubbed; near fine. [#010354] $30
Richford, Samisdat, 1980. An omnibus volume collecting the poems in his three earlier Samisdat pamphlets, along with new poems. Near fine in wrappers. [#010352] $50
Richford, Samisdat, 1980. An omnibus volume collecting the poems in his three earlier Samisdat pamphlets, along with new poems. Fine in wrappers. [#010351] $70
NY, Random House, (1967). Elkin's third book, second novel. Fine in a very near fine dust jacket with a hint of edge wear. [#018064] SOLD
NY, Scribner, (1987). The uncorrected proof copy. Two pages are bound in upside down and out of order. Reviewer's notes, mostly on the rear blank. Near fine in wrappers. [#013589] $25
1990. October 24, 1990. Elkin effusively thanks the recipient for comments on his recent article and apparently for having sent him soap, a subject that had come up in the article: ". . . thank you most of all for those wonderful wrapped emulsifiers and alkali-reamed fats, those delicious sodium and potassium salts and acids. Man, if I had your job I'd have been World Soap Czar by now!" Signed by the author. Folded for mailing; else fine, with hand-addressed mailing envelope. [#015553] $125
(Anthology)
[Boston], [Houghton Mifflin], [1980]. An advance issue consisting of unbound 8-1/2" x 11" sheets of this collection edited by Stanley Elkin and with stories by John Updike, John Sayles, Donald Barthelme, Frederick Busch, William Gass, Larry Heinemann, I.B. Singer, Grace Paley, Peter Taylor, Mavis Gallant, Elizabeth Hardwick and others. Elkin's introduction bears copyeditor's marks throughout. Minor edge wear to a few pages; else fine. [#000786] $200
NY, Scribner, (1971). A review copy of what may be his most well-known novel. Inscribed by the author in 1974. Fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#012268] $60
Garden City, Doubleday, 1973. The uncorrected proof copy of this large collection of stories and prose poems, in the form of tall, bound galley sheets printed on rectos only. Stamped "Final Galley." A number of the galley pages are loose but all are present. Near fine in wrappers and signed by the author. Scarce, fragile format. [#001425] $100
(Toronto), McClelland & Stewart, (1976). The uncorrected proof copy of the first edition of her most famous book, a short, haunting novel of a woman in the Canadian wilderness who develops an intimate relationship with a wild bear. The book became a feminist classic for its depiction of a woman strong enough and independent enough to carve out her own destiny irrespective of societal expectations and taboos. Near fine in wrappers. [#011434] $70
New Rochelle, The Elizabeth Press, (1975). Hardcover, 1/250 copies, printed in Italy. Inscribed by the author "with love". A fine copy in publisher's plain cardboard slipcase. [#002084] SOLD
(New Rochelle), (The Elizabeth Press), (1966). One of 500 copies in wrappers. Inscribed by the author "with love". Important press. Near fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#002076] SOLD
1983-1986. Three typed letters signed and two typed notes signed from Epstein, novelist and Director of the Graduate Creative Writing Program at Boston University, to another writer. Epstein commiserates with the recipient after his novel is unjustly reviewed by a "feminist communist, or historian of feminists or communists or whatever, but what connection has she to literature?" He tries to coax his correspondent into teaching a workshop at B.U. In the later letters, he submits to him his curriculum vita (Rhodes, Fullbright, Guggenheim, NEA...Married, three children, condo in Brookline, Subaru wagon) and his recommendations for the Swados Prize. Frank, personal and literary. All on Boston University stationery; fine. [#012788] $125
Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1990. Inscribed by the author in the month prior to publication. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#013192] $25
(NY), Avon, (1999). The advance reading copy (marked "Advance Uncorrected Proof") of his highly praised novel, focused on millennial, and millennarian, issues. Fine in wrappers and dust jacket (which reprints the oft-used Thomas Pynchon blurb). [#014438] SOLD
Berkeley, Oyez, (1966). One of 1000 copies. Fine in a very near fine dust jacket, with the publisher's prospectus laid in. [#001437] SOLD
(Newcastle), Blue Oak Press, 1977. The limited edition. One of 100 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#006917] $125
Garden City, Doubleday, 1967. A sequence of love poems, and a spiritual autobiography. This is an advance review copy and is signed by the author as "William Everson." Owner name front flyleaf; fine in a dust jacket that is missing a piece from the rear panel, and has a tear at the top of the rear flap fold--thus only good. Jacket photo by Thomas Merton. [#006915] SOLD
(El Paso), (Texas Western Press), (1988). Photographs by Farah of fifty Southwest writers, with their responses to a query on the role of the landscape in compelling them to write. Featured writers include Edward Abbey, William Eastlake, Joy Harjo, Tony Hillerman, Paul Horgan, N. Scott Momaday, John Nichols, Elizabeth Tallent, Frank Waters, Ann Zwinger, and others. Also included is a short bio and bibliography of each author. Signed by Farah in the year of publication. Quarto; fine in a fine dust jacket. [#015164] $45
NY, Vanguard, (1942). Owner name and date (1942) on front endpaper and some markings in text; thus only very good in a very good, spine-sunned dust jacket with a couple tiny chips. An attractive copy of one of his scarcer titles. [#011437] $45
(n.p), (n.p), (n.d.). Farrell's typescript pages (pp. 4, 5, 11) for what appears to be an introduction to a work by or about Dreiser. Reportedly, this was from an introduction to a Collier Books edition of Sister Carrie, but we have been unable to verify that such an edition existed. It is not from the 1975 Sagamore Press edition (which does have a Farrell introduction). Nor, as best as we can tell, is it from Farrell's introduction to The Best Short Stories of Theodore Dreiser, nor the 1955 volume The Stature of Theodore Dreiser, nor the 1962 volume Theodore Dreiser. What it is: three pages of text (two ribbon copy; one carbon copy), with holograph corrections, with an additional two pages (p. 11, p. 12) of notes/inserts, in manuscript. It is verifiable as Farrell's by the fact that in the text he quotes from letters to himself from H.L. Mencken, about Dreiser. The manuscript pages are darkened; page 11 has some offsetting; near fine. Farrell wrote about Sister Carrie repeatedly in his career, including a piece for the New York Times Book Review in 1943. Dreiser's book claimed the #33 spot on the Modern Library's list of Books of the Century, four spots behind Farrell's Lonigan Trilogy. [#012793] $300
NY, Vanguard Press, 1932. A "special edition, the sale of which is limited to physicians, surgeons, psychologists, psychiatrists, sociologists, social workers, teachers and other persons having a professional interest in the psychology of adolescence." Farrell's first novel, originally published in 1932 as the first book in the Studs Lonigan trilogy, which chronicled the maturing, degradation and, finally, death of a young Chicago man, destroyed by the pressures of modern urban street life. The books were controversial in their day for their unflinching, realistic portrayal of the brutalities of city life and their honest rendering of both the thoughts and the speech of a youth growing up on the streets. This edition, with an added preface, prints the above three times on the jacket, with the added disclaimer that "It is the sincere conviction of the publisher that this book could not conceivably harm any individual, whether or not a member of a profession. The plan for restricting its circulation has been adopted merely for the purpose of meeting official prejudice." Near fine in a fair, fragile jacket, chipped along the edges and with a detached front flapfold. [#011435] $300
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Catalog 169