E-list # 137

Advance Copies

(n.p.), Viking, (1993). The advance reading copy of her second novel. Fine in wrappers. [#915466] $70

(London), Faber and Faber, (2003). The advance reading copy of his Guardian Prize- and Booker Prize-winning first novel. Extremely slight corner bump; still fine in wrappers. [#024593] $100

NY, Putnam's, (1977). A working copy of the uncorrected proof, with more than a half dozen of Plimpton's photocopied inserts stapled to existing pages, notations where the inserts occur, and a renumbering of chapters after Chapter 17 is broken in two. "Zeroxes [sic] of Plimpton corrections attached" written on front cover. Handling apparent to covers; reading creases to spine; very good in wrappers. An interesting glimpse of both the work-in-progress and the publication methodology of the 1970s: an artifact of a now long-gone era. [#031745] $500

(NY), Atlantic Monthly Press, (1991). The uncorrected proof copy of the first book by the author of The Omnivore's Dilemma, In Defense of Food, The Botany of Desire, and Cooked. Here titled The Idea of a Garden; published as Second Nature: A Gardener's Education. Selected by the American Horticultural Society as one of its 75 Great American Garden Books. This proof is shot from typescript and reproduces holograph page numbers. Mild wrinkling to a couple of pages, apparently in production; fading to spine; near fine in wrappers. The earliest appearance in print of any book-length work by this author whose writings have become instant bestsellers and touchstones for our times. Scarce. [#029955] $250

[London], (Sceptre), (2012). Two volumes: the first and second issue uncorrected proof copies of the true first (British) edition of Powers' highly praised first novel: winner of the PEN/Hemingway Award, the Guardian Book Prize, a finalist for the National Book Award, and one of The New York Times ten best books of the year. The first issue proof is shot from photo-reduced typescript, bound in light yellow wrappers with three blurbs on the rear panel, by Colm Toibin, Chris Cleave, and Philipp Meyer. Faint handling apparent to covers; very near fine in wrappers. The second issue proof is typeset, bound in medium yellow wrappers with a photo of the author on the inside front cover, two blurbs on the front cover and only one blurb (by Philipp Meyer) on the rear cover. Fine in wrappers, with publicity sheet laid in. [#032685] $350

NY, Morrow, (1993). The advance reading copy of his fourth novel, a technically brilliant and highly moving story of wounded children in an age that can barely recognize them, let alone heal them. A finalist for the National Book Award. Fine in wrappers. [#911888] $80

London, Heinemann, (2001). The uncorrected proof copy of the British edition. Fine in wrappers. [#911899] $100

NY, Morrow, (1988). The uncorrected proof copy of his second novel. Publication date written vertically across front cover; fine in wrappers. [#911881] $350

NY, Morrow, (1991). The uncorrected proof copy of his third novel, a dazzling display of verbal pyrotechnics which once again earned him high praise, award recognition, and comparisons with the best of the postmodern writers such as Pynchon. Like his first book, a nominee for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Winner of Time magazine's Book of the Year award. Publication date written across front cover; fine in wrappers. Laid in is an announcement of a printing error that resulted in strings of letters and numbers appearing at the bottom of more than 100 pages. [#911885] $500

NY, Beech Tree Books, (1985). The uncorrected proof copy of one of the most highly praised first novels of its time -- a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and winner of the Rosenthal Award from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters for a book of "considerable literary achievement." Publication date written on front cover; near fine in wrappers. An uncommon proof, and an important debut. [#911113] $1,000

Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1976. The uncorrected proof copy of the second book by the author of The Wanderers and Clockers. Like those books, this was the basis for a major Hollywood movie. Price has written a number of well-received screenplays himself, including The Color of Money and Sea of Love, and worked on the highly praised HBO series The Wire -- which are all characterized by a facility with dialogue that is also evident in his novels; the books also exhibit a sense of humor and compassion that is remarkable, particularly given their gritty, urban settings. Inscribed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#028012] $300

Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1974. The uncorrected proof copy of his well-received first book, the basis for the Philip Kaufman film. Inscribed by the author: "To ___/ may all your Xmases be white. Richard Price." Dated January 24, 1976. Fine in wrappers with a promotional sheet stapled to the first blank. [#028010] $750

NY, Scribner, (1993). The uncorrected proof copy of her third work of fiction and second novel, which won both the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize -- a rare literary double. Fine in wrappers. [#911907] $250

(NY), Scribner, (1996). The uncorrected proof copy. Fine in wrappers. [#911924] $100

NY, Scribner's, (1992). The uncorrected proof copy of her second book of fiction and first novel. Winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award. Fine in wrappers. [#023936] $500

NY, Scribner's, (1992). The uncorrected proof copy of her second book of fiction and first novel. Winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award. Signed by the author. "Received" stamp front cover. Corner crease to rear cover; coffee staining to front cover and spine. Very good in wrappers. [#027705] $500

NY, Scribner's, (1992). The uncorrected proof copy of her second book of fiction and first novel. Winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award. Fine in wrappers. [#911919] $500

NY, Knopf, (1988). The uncorrected proof copy of the first American edition of the second book in his Sally Lockhart trilogy. "Press Copy" markings to cover and summary page; title and date handwritten on spine; else fine in wrappers. Pullman's "His Dark Materials" trilogy, published just after the Sally Lockhart books, became worldwide bestsellers and modern fantasy classics. [#023041] $375

NY, Knopf, (1993). The uncorrected proof copy of the first American edition of this dark young adult novel that was later reprinted as The Butterfly Tattoo. Slightly dusty; else fine in wrappers. [#023042] $200

NY, Arbor House, (1975). The uncorrected proof copy. Fine in tall padbound wrappers, wrapped in a proof dust jacket. A fragile format; uncommon. [#027260] $100

NY, Weidenfeld & Nicolson, (1986). The uncorrected proof copy. A novel set in the 1920s in which a veteran of World War I -- an Ojibwa Indian -- returns to his Midwestern town and claims parentage of a white couple's son. Signed by the author. Mild spine sunning; else fine in wrappers. [#030032] $100

NY, Viking Press, (1981). The uncorrected proof copy. Signed by the author. Spine and edge sunned, with a corner crease to the rear cover; near fine in wrappers. [#030030] $100

Philadelphia, Lippincott, (1963). The advance reading copy of his first book, winner of the Faulkner Foundation Award for best first novel of the year. With elaborate inventiveness, labyrinthine plots and a sometimes paranoid comic sense, Pynchon became the postmodern standard against whom all writers since have been measured. Each of his first three novels won one or more of the major literary awards given out in this country. Some cover creasing; spine creased from binder's glue and somewhat sunned; a very good copy in wrappers. [#024611] $1,250

(London), Quercus, (2010). The advance reading copy of the first British edition (preceded by the Australian edition but preceding the American edition) of this highly praised first novel. Fine in wrappers. [#028537] $150

NY, RH, (1973). Uncorrected proof copy. A collection of poetry by the author of Mumbo Jumbo and the editor of Yardbird. Near fine in tall wrappers and signed by the author. [#006636] $100

NY, Knopf, 1998. The uncorrected proof copy of this collection of vampire tales. A bit of smudging to rear cover; else fine in wrappers. [#014623] $80

(London), Little Brown, (2004). The advance reading copy of the British edition of this massive novel, which was loosely based on the author's life story, including his escape from an Australian prison and living on the run for a number of years. He wrote the novel while in prison, after being recaptured, and it became a bestseller. He is now working on a sequel to it. Labeled "uncorrected bound proof." Fine in wrappers. Uncommon in an advance issue. [#914678] $250

(Toronto), Knopf Canada, (2000). The uncorrected proof copy of her second book, first novel. Crease to lower front spine fold; else fine in wrappers. Together with a small vile of "sand from Monkey Beach." In a small card handmade and signed by the author for Women in Print. Fine. [#915512] $80

New Haven, Yale University Press, (2010). The advance reading copy of the third book of nonfiction, essays on science and religion, by the Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist. A few nicks to front cover from label removal, and a small bit of staining to the rear cover; very good in wrappers. Scarce in an advance issue. [#031489] $125

NY, Farrar Straus Giroux, (2014). The advance reading copy of this novel by the Pulitzer Prize winning author of Gilead; this novel, also set in the town of Gilead, won the National Book Critics Circle Award. Slight splay to cover; else fine in wrappers, with publisher's promotional pages laid in. Like a number of other ARCs of recent years, this appears to have been done in minuscule quantities; we have seen very few of them on the market. [#031753] $125

NY, Simon & Schuster, (2014). The advance reading copy of this collection of original writing by Marilynne Robinson, Rick Moody, Jeffrey Eugenides, Donald Antrim, Edwidge Danticat, Susan Cheever, Lois Lowry, Andrew Sean Greer, Meg Wolitzer, David Shields, Jincy Willett, and many others reminiscing about their time at Brown. A collection notable both for the extraordinary and amusing range of experiences included and also, frequently, for its behind the scenes glimpses of these authors as, not just emerging writers, but emerging adults. Robinson contributes "Higher Learning," about, among other things, discovering the writing of Jonathan Edwards. Because of the extent to which publishers' promotional efforts have become digitally oriented in recent years, printed advance copies like this one have become increasingly scarce, even more so than they had been in prior years when their numbers were already only a tiny fraction of the numbered of copies published. Trace wear to the spine ends; very near fine in wrappers. [#031490] $125

NY/London, FSG/Virago, (2015). A hybrid advance copy of this collection of essays: American sheets bound into Virago wrappers to be used as a British proof copy. With a Virago press release laid in. Robinson's ninth book after four books of fiction and four books of nonfiction, which together brought her a Pulitzer Prize, two National Book Critic Circle Awards, and an Orange Prize. Although her fiction is most closely associated with the American Northwest and Midwest, her first work of nonfiction, Mother Country, exposed the downsides of a British nuclear reprocessing plant. These essays return to her mainstay themes of Calvinist liberalism. Robinson, who was interviewed by President Obama in 2015, received a National Humanities Medal from the President in 2012. Fine, but fragile: the perfect binding is not of the highest caliber. [#032825] $200

NY, Vintage, (1998). The advance reading copy of the Vintage edition. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, and one of the series of award-winning novels Roth published in the 1990s that, by general critical consensus, surpassed anything he had done before and elevated him to the front rank of American novelists, and a legitimate candidate for the Nobel Prize for Literature. Fine in wrappers. [#911982] $70

NY, Simon & Schuster, (1990). The uncorrected proof copy of this novel which was the first time Roth used his own name for the main character of a novel. He did it again in Operation Shylock and The Plot Against America, both books that accumulated multiple awards and award nominations. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. This is the only signed copy we have seen. [#911964] $375

NY, Simon & Schuster, (1993). Harold Bloom's copy of the uncorrected proof copy of Roth's novel, winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award and Time magazine's Book of the Year; also voted one of the best works of American fiction in a quarter century in a New York Times Book Review survey. Bloom is perhaps most famous for his controversial book The Western Canon, which argued against "the Balkanization of literary studies" and presented an exhaustive list of what he considered to comprise the canon. Six Philip Roth books made it onto Bloom's list, including this title. With a typed note signed by Roth, from two years prior, laid in, in which Roth raves to Bloom about Douglas Hobbie's first novel, Boomfell. The note is folded, else fine. The proof has Bloom's notations on the front cover and summary page; handling apparent to covers; very good in wrappers. A good association copy between one of the leading novelists of his time and one of the leading critics of the day. [#032317] $1,500

NY, Farrar Straus Giroux, (1987). The uncorrected proof copy. Voted one of the best works of American fiction in a quarter century in a survey conducted by the New York Times Book Review. Of the 22 titles named in that survey, Roth was the author of six of them. Promotional sheet stapled inside the front cover; slight spine-fading, thus near fine in wrappers. [#030383] $200

London, Jonathan Cape, (2000). The uncorrected proof copy of the British edition. Winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award. Fine in wrappers. [#911991] $60

(NY), (Houghton Mifflin), (2009). The advance reading copy of Roth's 30th book, a novella. Trace corner wear; very near fine in wrappers. A scarce advance copy. [#028318] $100

Boston/NY, Houghton Mifflin, 2004. Literary critic Harold Bloom's copy of the advance reading copy of Roth's "alternate history" novel, which imagines a pro-Nazi Charles Lindbergh defeating Franklin Delano Roosevelt in the 1940 presidential election. With Harold Bloom's signature. Age-toning to pages; near fine in wrappers. [#032316] $350

London, Cape, (1985). The uncorrected proof copy of the first edition of this volume not separately published in the U.S. until the 1996 paperback edition. Slight abrasion to rear cover; else fine in wrappers. A Roth rarity. Roth became one of the most highly acclaimed American novelists in recent memory with a string of award-winning books in the 1990s and 2000s and inclusion of six volumes of his writings in the Library of America series. [#911956] $500

NY, Farrar Straus Giroux, (1981). The uncorrected proof copy. Spine a bit faded, else fine in wrappers. [#911950] $70

(London), HarperCollins Children's Books, (2011). The advance reading copy of the first British edition, and first paperback edition, of the first book in her bestselling young adult dystopian trilogy, written while Roth was a senior at Northwestern University and filmed in 2013. Gentle corner creasing; very near fine in wrappers. Uncommon in any advance issue. [#030798] $125

(n.p.), (n.p.), [ca. 1997]. Tapebound typescript of this Booker Prize-winning first novel. 248 pages, 8-1/2" x 11", bound in printed light green cardstock covers, and shot from word-processed sheets rather than typeset ones. No indication of publisher (which, in the U.S., was Random House). After the considerable success of this book in England, where it was reprinted numerous times, Random House decided to do a glossy advance reading copy in pictorial wrappers. Consequently, few copies of the standard proof were done. We are aware of another, "in-house" state of the advance copy, which, if we remember correctly, was also 8-1/2" x 11" tapebound sheets, but typeset and in blue covers and listing the publisher on the inner pages. Uncommon; we've never seen this issue of the book before. Unmarked, but from the library of Peter Matthiessen. Near fine. [#032318] $500

(n.p.), (Dial Press), (1968). The uncorrected proof copy of his Pulitzer Prize-winning play. Quarto, 8" x 11"; paper clip imprint to front cover and first few pages (clip still present); sunning to covers and the number 48 written in pencil on front; near fine. An uncommon format, suggesting that not many copies would have been done. [#007163] $250

[Self-Published], 2001. A self-published artist's book, of a story that takes place over the last 91 minutes of one August day in 2001. Text and illustrations by Savage. Signed: "Artist's Proof 2001, CHS" on the final page. Ring-bound, with rubbed acetate covers; else fine. This material inspired a dance piece by Jennifer Chin, although we have found no evidence of its having been formally published nor listings for it in OCLC. [#032676] $200

NY, Macmillan, (1973). The uncorrected proof copy of her well-received first book, which was chosen by Time magazine as one of the 10 best novels of the year. Inscribed by the author. Covers dust-soiled; else fine in wrappers. [#006083] $150

NY, Ticknor & Fields, 1988. The second book by this author who has won a MacArthur Foundation "genius grant" as well as a Lannan Foundation award, and been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the PEN/Faulkner Award. An advance issue consisting of folded and gathered sheets. Fine, laid into a near fine dust jacket worn where it overlays the sheets. Uncommon. [#021311] $70

London, Hamish Hamilton, (2001). The hardcover uncorrected proof of the first English language edition. Fine. [#912025] $200

NY, Little Brown, (2013). The advance reading copy of this collection of "essays, etc." that debuted at No. 1 on the New York Times bestseller list. Fine in wrappers. Like other contemporary advance reading copies, this appears to have been issued in very small numbers, with few having turned up on the market. [#031754] $70

Indianapolis, Bobbs-Merrill, (1968). The galley sheets of this early play by Shepard, his first two-act play. Laid in are the galleys of Elizabeth Hardwick's introduction, dated 1967; Hardwick had reviewed the play for the New York Review of Books. At the time Shepard wrote La Turista, he was a member of the counterculture rock band The Holy Modal Rounders, which had a cameo appearance in the film Easy Rider. Shepard may be most widely known these days as an actor: he was nominated for an Academy Award for his role as test pilot Chuck Yeager in The Right Stuff; but he won a Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1979 for Buried Child, and he has won eleven Obie awards and been nominated for two Tonys, for Buried Child and True West. He received the Gold Medal for Drama from the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1992. Claspbound, printed on rectos only, front cover tanned and separating; rear cover has date and price and "DUPL NYPL." Front cover has the name of Paul Myers, curator of the Theatre Collection at the New York Public Library. Very good. A fragile and rare early state of this play by one of the most important playwrights of the latter half of the 20th century. The only copy of the proof we have seen. [#027093] $2,500

NY, Knopf, 1989. The uncorrected proof copy. Signed by the author. Spine sunned; else fine in wrappers. [#914303] $80

(Willimantic), Curbstone Press, (2004). The uncorrected proof copy of the third book of poetry by this writer of mixed Native American/Chicano/European ancestry. Fine in wrappers. [#025741] $60

NY, Bantam, 1988. The uncorrected proof copy. Unevenly sunned, thus very good in wrappers. Stamp of another author inside the front cover. Letter from the publisher's publicity director laid in. Also laid in is a fold out pictorial promotional item. [#031074] $70

(London), Macmillan, (2010). The advance reading copy of the British edition of Skloot's biography of Henrietta Lacks and her descendants, which in broad definition includes the HeLa cell line, the first human cells to survive in perpetuity outside of a human body, and which were taken from the dying Lacks in the 1950s without her or her family's knowledge or consent, and used to create both miracles (cures) and money (though not for the Lackses, an impoverished black family in Maryland). Originally to be published by W.H. Freeman, who was bought out by Henry Holt in 2003; Holt reportedly wanted less of the Lacks family in the narrative, so Skloot pulled out and the title was auctioned to Crown. The book was published in 2010; the first U.S. printing sold out in a day, and Crown reprinted the book three times in two days. A surprising bestseller; the U.S. paperback issue remains on the New York Times bestseller list four years later. Oprah is reportedly producing a film version for HBO; in 2013 the HeLa genome was sequenced and published (an agreement for which was reportedly reached with the family after-the-fact). Smudges to foredge, else fine in wrappers (which are designed so as to appear worn and aged, like the photograph of Henrietta on the front cover). Scarce in any advance format. [#030813] $350

NY, Knopf, 1991. The uncorrected proof copy of her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#912772] $175

NY, Knopf, 1991. An advance reading excerpt from her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel. Fine in wrappers and signed by the author. Slipcased together with an excerpt from Mating by Norman Rush, which won the National Book Award; also fine in wrappers, but not signed. A remarkable package of prepublication excerpts from the two major award-winning novels of the year. [#912773] $100

NY, Knopf, 2003. The uncorrected proof copy. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. With an interview with Smiley laid in. [#912781] $60

NY, Knopf, 1995. The uncorrected proof copy. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#912789] $70

Baton Rouge, Louisiana State U. Press, 1981. The author's first novel. Uncorrected proof copy. Fragile padbound proof with front cover detached but complete and unmarred; still near fine and signed by the author. [#011287] $70

(NY), Ecco/HarperCollins, (2010). The uncorrected proof copy of Smith's National Book Award-winning memoir of her pre-fame life with Robert Mapplethorpe, with textual differences from the published version. One of the most highly regarded memoirs to come out of the counterculture of the 1960s and 70s. This copy is signed by the author. Trace rubbing to the spine lettering; still fine in wrappers. An uncommon proof, especially signed. [#030138] $500

NY, Grand Central Publishing, (2008). The advance reading copy of his debut novel, the first in a trilogy, which caused considerable buzz when it was optioned for a film to be directed by Ridley Scott. (The 2015 film was directed by Daniel Espinosa and produced by Scott.) Set in Stalinist Russia, the plot involves a Russian secret police officer who is framed by a colleague for treason and stumbles on a series of child murders which he attempts to solve despite being on the run for his life. Signed by the author. Slight spine roll, else fine in wrappers. Laid in is a printed flyer entitled, "How Do You Solve an Impossible Crime?" Winner of the CWA Silver Dagger Award and longlisted for the Man Booker Prize, a somewhat unusual honor for a thriller. [#029531] SOLD

Washington, DC, Counterpoint, (1996). The uncorrected proof copy of the complete sequence of poems under this title, which Snyder began in 1956 and of which sections had been published over the years in literary magazines and a chapbook in the early 1960s. From the library of Clayton Eshleman, and with Eshleman's notes in the text. A hint of spine sunning, else fine in wrappers. [#031499] $80

(n.p.), Avon Books, 2000. The advance reading copy ("Special Preview Edition/Uncorrected Author's Text") of his first solo novel, after several books with John Skipp. First released by Avon with this title (A Question of Will); later released by Stealth in hardcover as To Bury the Dead. Printed from Spector's third draft of 9/99. Fine in wrappers. [#031101] $70

NY, Bantam, (1994). The uncorrected proof copy of this pseudonymous political thriller. Tiny spot to lower spine, still fine in wrappers. [#915594] $100

NY, Knopf, 1973. Uncorrected proof copy. Fine in wrappers, and inscribed by the author in 1974. [#005511] $55

Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 2003. The advance reading copy. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers, with a photo of the author laid in, which is also signed by Stone. [#912806] $70

Boston/NY, Houghton Mifflin, 1997. Bound galley sheets; 8-1/2" x 11"; tapebound in cardstock covers. Presumably produced for in-house use only. Signed by the author. Fine. [#912808] $250

Boston/NY, Houghton Mifflin, 1997. His first collection of stories, spanning the years 1969 to 1997. Bound galley sheets; 8-1/2" x 11"; tapebound in cardstock covers. Presumably produced for in-house use only; we've never seen any indication of these having been distributed outside the publishing house. Fine. [#008297] $175

Boston/NY, Houghton Mifflin, 1997. The uncorrected proof copy of his first collection of stories, spanning the years 1969 to 1997. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#912809] $70

NY, Knopf, 1986. The uncorrected proof copy of the first American edition of his fourth novel, a look at the underside of the Hollywood mystique. Inscribed by Stone to Denis [Johnson] and his wife: "For Denis & Lucinda/ with admiration and respect -- my deepest esteem/ Robert Stone." Some dustiness and rubbing to the covers; very good in wrappers, in custom folding chemise and slipcase. A nice association between two writers who each won the National Book Award for a Vietnam-themed novel (Stone, Dog Soldiers, 1974; Johnson, Tree of Smoke, 2007), each of whose work has been at times compared to the other's. [#028552] $750

Boston/NY, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2012. The advance reading copy of his last novel, which was published to generally excellent reviews: the main critique seemed to be that it wasn't as massive or portentous as critics had come to expect from Robert Stone. It uses the form of a police procedural -- the inquiry into a college student's accidental death -- to inquire about larger issues of faith, love and accountability, as well as madness and the ability to deceive oneself. Fine in wrappers. The advance reading copy has turned up on the market very seldom; we've only seen a couple offered for sale, where in the past there would have been dozens of such copies showing up in the aftermarket -- once again an indication that publishers are cutting back on such productions, often replacing some part of their function with digital offerings. [#031759] $125

Boston, Houghton Mifflin, (1974). The uncorrected proof copy of his second novel, winner of the National Book Award and one of the best novels to link the impact of the Vietnam war on American society in the Sixties to the dark side of that era -- the official corruption and the underside of the drug experiences of a generation. This is the second issue proof, in gold-brown wrappers with a publisher's letter to booksellers reproduced on the front cover. Signed by the author. Shallow creases to three corners; near fine in wrappers. [#912822] $500

Boston, Houghton Mifflin, (1989). The uncorrected proof copy of this collection of original essays by Isabel Allende, Robert Stone, Gore Vidal, Charles McCarry and Marge Piercy. Mild spine sunning; near fine in wrappers. [#000319] $80

(NY), Ecco/HarperCollins, (2007). The advance reading copy (marked "Uncorrected Proof"). His first book of nonfiction, a memoir focusing primarily on the late 1950s and the 1960s, when Stone was closely involved with Ken Kesey and his Merry Pranksters. Second issue, with pp. 221-222 excised and a photocopied sheet laid in, which prints the text as it appeared in the final book. Near fine in wrappers. [#026404] $100

(Anthology)
Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1988. The uncorrected proof copy. Includes "Helping" by Robert Stone. Signed by Stone at his contribution. Other contributors include Louise Erdrich, Rick Bass, Raymond Carver and Tobias Wolff. "Press Copy" markings on cover and first page, and small stain to front cover; near fine in wrappers. "Helping" was also included in the anthology in this series that selected the best American short stories of the decade. [#912834] $70

Washington, D.C., Counterpoint, (1998). The uncorrected proof copy of this collection of McClanahan's previously uncollected work. With a foreword by Robert Stone, a longtime friend dating from the early 1960s at Stanford, where McClanahan introduced Stone to Ken Kesey and the other members of the Perry Lane crowd. Signed by Stone. Fine in wrappers. [#022553] $100

London, Faber and Faber, (1978). The uncorrected proof copy of this collection of two one-act plays, the first of which was written with the composer Andre Previn, in which the music was an integral part of the action of the play. Fine in plain wrappers. A scarce proof. [#026883] $500

NY, Putnam, (1989). The advance reading copy of her first novel, which was a surprise bestseller and went into over 30 printings in its first year. Made into a well-received film by Wayne Wang in 1993. Tan co-wrote the screenplay, which was nominated for a BAFTA, Writers Guild, and USC Scripter award. Spine-faded; near fine in wrappers. [#028554] $150

NY, Knopf, 1986. The uncorrected proof copy of the second novel, and first in 36 years, by this Southern writer who was renowned as a master of the short story. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#912852] $350

Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1973. The uncorrected proof copy of this collection of seven one-act plays, which in its trade edition is probably Taylor's scarcest work. A bit of handling apparent to wrappers; short tear to heel and one lower corner crease; still near fine. [#027751] $200

Arlington Hts, Dark Harvest, (1992). The uncorrected proof copy, in glossy yellow wrappers. Inscribed by the author. Stamp of another author on the summary page. Mild spine sunning, else fine in wrappers. [#031142] $70

(London), Bloomsbury, (1998). The advance reading copy of the British paperback edition (one year after the American and British hardcovers). Fine in wrappers. Uncommon advance copy. [#032911] $150

Santa Barbara, Neville, 1991. Thompson's first limited edition: a collection of three short pieces by Thompson, along with a half-mad letter to the publisher that serves as introduction to the volume. Published in an edition of 326 copies, this is a set of folded and gathered sheets (F&Gs). Unbound signatures with pages uncut; also without colophon. Fine. The only such copy of this title that we have seen. [#031764] SOLD

(London), Picador/Pan, (1991). The uncorrected proof copy of the first British edition of Vol. 3 of the Gonzo Papers. Wrappers slightly stained and creased; very good. Uncommon advance edition; this is the first copy we've seen. [#032913] $150

NY, Villard, (1997). An advance copy, the first issue proof, of Volume One of "The Fear and Loathing Letters," printing Thompson letters from 1955-1967. 8-1/2" x 11" sheets, tapebound in cardstock covers. Spotting/handling to covers; near fine. Date ("3/19") on front cover. There was an advance reading copy of this title in pictorial wrappers, which is common; an uncorrected proof copy in perfectbound white wrappers, which is uncommon; and this issue, preceding and scarcer than both; we've seen only one other copy of this issue offered for sale. [#031513] $450

NY, Random House, (1970). Two volumes: both a review copy of the first edition and the uncorrected proof copy of Toffler's massively successful book naming the disorientation caused by the accelerated pace of cultural and technological change. The first edition has some mild edge-foxing and is near fine in a very near fine dust jacket with a shallow crease to the rear panel. Folded in fourths and laid in are three different 2-legal-page press releases: "Future Shock May Be Key Disease of Tomorrow," "Movement for 'Responsible Technology' Needed to Combat Future Shock," and "To Prevent Future Shock, Schools Must Teach About Tomorrow." From the first: "When people complain they can't cope, what is it they can't cope with?" From the second: "... technological questions can no longer be answered in technological terms alone. 'They are political questions...we need a machinery for screening machines.'" From the third: "Today events are moving so swiftly that only another [post-John Dewey] radical shift in our 'time-bias' can save our children. The schools must develop future-consciousness." Together with the uncorrected proof copy, which is a tall, fragile, pad-bound proof, the text block of which seems perfectly fine, but the covers and spine have some staining and insect damage, and the covers are likely to detach in time. Because of the fragile nature of the proof, only a cursory search was made for textual variations from the published version, which revealed only that the Acknowledgements were moved from front to rear (and the spelling changed) and a change was made to the book's dedication. Uncommon advance states of one of the bestselling books of its time, and a book whose title became a part of the vernacular. [#032329] $1,500

(Comics)
(Wilmington), (Totleben & Bissette)/[Spiderbaby Grafix], (1988). An advance copy of the first issue of Taboo, a landmark comix/graphic novel anthology, inscribed by the editor (Totleben), with the written note "#3.5 in 25 preview copies." Tapebound 8-1/2" x 11" galley sheets, with a handwritten "Taboo!" label on the front cover. Contributions by Clive Barker, S. Clay Wilson, Alan Moore, Chester Brown, Charles Burns, Eddie Campbell, Charles Vess, Dave Sim, and others. Taboo published edgier graphic fiction than could be done by mainstream presses, including Alan Moore and Chester Brown's From Hell, and work by Charles Burns, famous for his later graphic novel Black Hole. Front label lifting; ownership stamps; else fine. Together with an 8-page solicitation of contributions dated the previous year, delineating the guidelines and the vision. Again, an ownership stamp; near fine with one corner stapled. Together with the published version of the first issue, inscribed by Totleben and the publisher, Stephen Bissette, as well as Taboo 2 and Taboo 3. A notable collection, particularly with the advance copy -- a handmade production apparently limited to 25 copies but doubtless far fewer still exist. [#030703] $750

St. Paul, Graywolf Press, (1995). The advance reading copy of this Ojibway writer's first novel, set on a fictional reservation in Minnesota. Signed by the author, with added sentiment "Wow!" Near fine in wrappers. [#025787] $70

NY, Picador, (1999). The advance reading copy of his second novel. Inscribed by the author: "For ___/ Where'd you get this?/ David Treuer." Fine in wrappers. [#025788] $70

(Woodstock), Sewanee Writers' Series/Overlook Press, (1999). The uncorrected proof copy. Fine in wrappers. [#912863] $60

NY, Knopf, 1988. The uncorrected proof copy of her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel. This is the second issue proof, with the first leaf corrected so that Tyler's previous publications are listed on the verso rather than the recto. Fine in wrappers. [#018767] $70

London, Chatto & Windus, 1985. The uncorrected proof of the British edition. Shot from typescript. Fine in a rumpled proof dust jacket. [#000736] $70

Markham, Penguin, 1985. The uncorrected proof of the Canadian edition of the novel that solidified Tyler's place as one of the foremost writers of her generation. Spine creasing; else fine in wrappers. [#000734] $55

NY, Knopf, 1985. The uncorrected proof copy. A novel made into an award-winning movie that solidified Tyler's place as one of the foremost writers of her generation. This is the second issue proof, in red wrappers. A little surplus glue on the spine; else fine in a fine dust jacket. [#018218] $100

NY, Knopf, 1972. The uncorrected proof copy of her fourth book, and the first in which she settles her character in Baltimore, where most of her future characters will find their homes. Scarce: this is only the second proof copy we've ever seen, and we've never seen any earlier proofs of hers on the market. Literary agency stamp (of Warren Bayless Agency, rather than of Russell and Volkening, with whom Tyler is usually associated) to half title and final page of text. Spine slanted and creased; some foxing to covers and page edges; still at least very good in wrappers and protected by a custom clamshell case. [#027120] ON HOLD
$1,750

NY, Knopf, 2007. The uncorrected proof copy of this collection. Includes essays, reflections, criticism and reviews, introductions he wrote to others' books, art criticism, a six-page introduction, and more. A bulky text, nearly 700 pages, with shallow corner creasing to the covers; near fine in yellow wrappers, with the cover art bound in. [#029541] $100

NY, Knopf, 1983. The uncorrected proof copy of this massive collection of essays and criticism from The New Yorker and elsewhere. Promotional sheet stapled inside the front cover and press release laid in. Fine in wrappers. [#030409] $125

NY, Knopf, 2009. The uncorrected proof copy of this posthumous collection. A few light spots to covers; near fine in wrappers. [#029542] $125

(Anthology)
Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1984. The uncorrected proof copy. Edited and with an introduction by John Updike. With stories by Andre Dubus, Paul Bowles, Madison Smartt Bell, Mavis Gallant, Susan Minot, Joyce Carol Oates, Cynthia Ozick, Lowry Pei, Jonathan Penner, Norman Rush and James Salter, among others. Very near fine in wrappers. [#009161] $50

(Boston), G.K. Hall and Marquis Who's Who, Inc., (1978). A poem by Updike, published as a holiday greeting card. Signed by the author. Fine, with original (unused) mailing envelope. Together with a presumed proof copy, with the copyright notice handwritten (in an unknown hand) rather than printed on the rear cover. Also fine. Both housed together in a G.K. Hall envelope. A scarce ephemeral piece, especially uncommon signed, and notably rare in the variant with the handwritten copyright notice. [#031524] $1,500

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Catalog 168