E-list # 137

Advance Copies

(Anthology)
[Boston], [Houghton Mifflin], [1980]. An advance issue consisting of unbound 8-1/2" x 11" sheets of this collection edited by Stanley Elkin and with stories by John Updike, John Sayles, Donald Barthelme, Frederick Busch, William Gass, Larry Heinemann, I.B. Singer, Grace Paley, Peter Taylor, Mavis Gallant, Elizabeth Hardwick and others. Elkin's introduction bears copyeditor's marks throughout. Minor edge wear to a few pages; else fine. [#000786] $200
NY, Simon & Schuster, (1972). The uncorrected proof copy of Ellsberg's account of his release of the Pentagon Papers in 1971 to the New York Times, an illegal act of civil disobedience for which he was charged with a number of felonies under the Espionage Act of 1917 and became a target of President Richard Nixon; Ellsberg was acquitted a year after this book came out because of government malfeasance in the case against him. These are historical papers, heavily colored by the author's personal experience as a participant in, and an observer and critic of, policy making regarding the U.S. role in Southeast Asia. Realizing, as a result of his work for the RAND Corporation, a policy "think tank," that the government had secretly engaged in an ongoing series of illegal and immoral acts in the conduct of the Vietnam war, Ellsberg first copied 7000 pages of documents and gave them to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. When no action resulted from that, he gave the papers to the Times, precipitating a scandal and his own arrest. Such whistle blowers as Julian Assange of Wikileaks and Edward Snowden, the NSA contractor who exposed the widespread secret data collection done by that agency, have followed in Ellsberg's footsteps. This copy is signed by the author on the front cover. Tall, fragile, padbound proofs; rear cover present but detached; front cover detaching; thus a good copy. [#028629] $350
Garden City, Doubleday, 1973. The uncorrected proof copy of this large collection of stories and prose poems, in the form of tall, bound galley sheets printed on rectos only. Stamped "Final Galley." A number of the galley pages are loose but all are present. Near fine in wrappers and signed by the author. Scarce, fragile format. [#001425] $100
(Toronto), McClelland & Stewart, (1976). The uncorrected proof copy of the first edition of her most famous book, a short, haunting novel of a woman in the Canadian wilderness who develops an intimate relationship with a wild bear. The book became a feminist classic for its depiction of a woman strong enough and independent enough to carve out her own destiny irrespective of societal expectations and taboos. Near fine in wrappers. [#011434] $70
(Native American)
(NY), HarperCollins, (2003). The advance reading copy of this collection of selected and new poems, her first poetry collection in 14 years. Signed by the author. Erdrich is best-known as a novelist: her first novel, Love Medicine, won the National Book Critics Circle Award in 1984; her novel The Round House won the 2012 National Book Award. One shallow corner crease, else fine in wrappers. An uncommon advance issue, and a scarce title signed in any issue or format. [#032810] $125
(NY), Harper, (2010). The advance reading copy of this novel. Signed by the author. Fine in self-wrappers, with a copy of the flyer from a book signing laid in. [#029699] $100
(NY), HarperCollins, (2005). The advance reading copy of this sequel to The Birchbark House, a children's novel by the award-winning author of Love Medicine and other novels. Erdrich, an enrolled member of the Chippewa tribe, is one of the most successful and acclaimed authors of the "second wave" of the Native American Renaissance. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. Uncommon advance copy, especially scarce signed. [#029523] $100
NY, Little Brown, (2007). The advance reading copy of his first novel. A finalist for the National Book Award. His third novel, To Rise Again at a Decent Hour, was short-listed for the 2014 Man Booker Prize. Inscribed by the author in 2008. One page corner turned; near fine in wrappers. Uncommon in the advance issue, especially signed. [#031686] $200
(London), Hodder & Stoughton, (2003). The limited advance reading copy. One of 50 numbered copies Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers, with promotional postcard laid in. Also included is the four page flyer announcing the book, the trade paperback, and the offer of one of 50 limited edition advance copies. Also includes a glossary for getting up to speed in the series. [#912500] $100
(London), Picador, (1994). The uncorrected proof copy of the uncommon first book by the author of Bridget Jones's Diary. The latter was the British Book of the Year in 1998. This title was not published in the U.S. until 2001. Near fine in wrappers and jacket; uncommon. [#018591] $100
NY, Crown, (2013). The advance reading copy of Fink's National Book Critics Circle Award-winning book about the decision to hasten the deaths of some of the weaker patients while awaiting (and losing hope for) evacuation of Memorial Medical Center in the midst of Hurricane Katrina. Expanded from Fink's Pulitzer Prize-winning essay for the New York Times Magazine, and with textual changes between this version and the final, published book. "July 13" written in marker on the lower edge of the text block (the book was published in September). Fine in self-wrappers. A landmark of investigative reporting. Scarce in the advance issue. [#031384] $100
(North Sydney), Knopf, (2008). The advance reading copy of the true first (Australian) edition of this novel by the winner of the Man Booker Prize for The Narrow Road to the Deep North. Inscribed by the author in Tasmania in 2008 to another writer, "who led me to the spirit of Rilke, and much else besides -- warm wishes. Richard Flanagan." Several notations by recipient in text; near fine in wrappers. An uncommon advance copy and an excellent association copy. [#031386] $500
NY, Crown, (2012). The advance reading copy of her third book, a dark thriller. The hardcover spent 80 weeks on The New York Times bestseller list, until the paperback came out, which went immediately to number 1 and remains on the list still. Gone Girl was a publishing phenomenon -- a literary thriller that appealed to virtually every category of reader. A Salon reviewer lamented that it received no serious consideration for the National Book Award or the Pulitzer Prize, presumably because of its categorization as genre fiction. Janet Maslin of the New York Times selected it as one of her 10 best books of the year. Basis for the major Hollywood movie. Trace corner wear; very near fine in wrappers. The first edition is somewhat uncommon; the prepublication advance reading copy is extremely scarce. [#030720] $125
(NY), Distributed Art Publishers, (2001). The uncorrected proof copy. A collection of original writings inspired by the work of Joseph Cornell and edited by Foer. Contributors include Barry Lopez, Rick Moody, Howard Norman, Diane Ackerman, Siri Hustvedt, Lydia Davis, Robert Coover, Bradford Morrow, Joyce Carol Oates, Paul West, Joanna Scott and others, including Foer, who contributes both a chapter and the introduction. Signed by Foer. Small heel bump; else fine in wrappers. The proof does not include the photographs of Cornell's work. [#912506] $275
Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 2002. The advance reading copy of his first novel, one of the most highly praised literary debuts of the year -- named Book of the Year by the Los Angeles Times and winner of the Guardian First Book Prize, among other literary awards. A film adaptation, done by Liev Schreiber, won the Laterna Magica Prize at the 2005 Venice Film Festival. Signed by the author. In the first issue, red and cream wrappers. Slight splaying to front cover; near fine. [#029309] $125
(London), Hamish Hamilton, (2002). The advance reading copy of the first British edition of his first novel, one of the most highly praised literary debuts of the year -- named Book of the Year by the Los Angeles Times and winner of the Guardian First Book Prize, among other literary awards. A film adaptation, done by Liev Schreiber, won the Laterna Magica Prize at the 2005 Venice Film Festival. Signed by the author. Covers lightly rubbed, else fine in wrappers. [#912510] $100
(London), Hamish Hamilton, (2005). The advance reading copy of the British edition, printed from sheets of the American advance edition, with British covers. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#912516] $100
NY, Knopf, 2002. The uncorrected proof of the first American edition of this collection of stories. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#912523] $70
NY, Harper & Row, (1976). The advance reading copy of the first book by the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Independence Day. Signed by the author. A couple of small, faint spots to cover and a bit of creasing to the lower edge of the rear cover; near fine in wrappers. [#914954] SOLD
London, Harvill, (1995). An advance copy of the first British edition of Ford's Pulitzer Prize- and PEN/Faulkner Award-winning novel, with printed text on the front cover that indicates that the "text is not the final version," and, in fact, this text does seem to be an earlier state than that of not only the British trade edition but the U.S. edition as well. The text does seem to match that of the British advance reading copy. Approximately 8-3/8" x 11-3/4" tapebound sheets in printed cardstock covers. Signed by Ford. Photoreproduced name on the front cover; dusty rear cover; else fine. An uncommon view of an earlier state of the text of the second book in his Frank Bascombe series, which now runs to four volumes. The photocopied name on the front cover, together with the style of binding, give an indication that the proof was likely one of a very small number, hand-produced by the publisher in-house rather than printed and bound by a full-fledged printer, which would have been done in larger quantities. [#911204] $1,000
NY, Atlantic Monthly, (1987). An advance reading excerpt from his fourth book, first collection of stories. Warmly inscribed by the author: "For ___. With great gratitude to you. And with the happy memories of seeing you again. Richard. Portland. June 30, 1995[?]." Fine in stapled wrappers. [#912543] $70
(London), Bloomsbury, (2006). The advance reading copy of the first British edition of Ford's sequel to Independence Day. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#912550] SOLD
NY, Knopf, 2006. The uncorrected proof copy (not the far more common advance reading copy) of the third book in Ford's four-book series featuring Frank Bascombe; the preceding book, Independence Day, won the Pulitzer Prize. Four pages marked in the text, with the final page listing three of these marked pages. The reader (reviewer?) appeared most interested in Ford's stated parallels between novelists and realtors. Cocked, with several stains to the light green wrappers. A very good copy of a scarce proof. [#031691] SOLD
NY, Vintage, (1986). The uncorrected proof copy of his breakthrough book, the first in his Pulitzer Prize-winning Bascombe series. Signed by the author. Published as a paperback original: proofs in the Vintage Contemporaries series seem to have been done in much smaller quantities than those of their counterparts slated for hardcover publication, and seem to have received much more limited distribution: many review venues -- including newspapers and magazines -- have policies precluding the reviewing of paperback publications. Buckle to front spine fold, possibly from binding; very near fine in wrappers. Review slip laid in, asking the reader to disregard "large, unnumbered spaces" on more than a dozen pages, which "will not appear in the finished book." Scarce signed. [#914961] $500
London, Harvill Press, (2001). The first separate appearance of this story, which first appeared in The New Yorker and is here published as an advance reading excerpt from the collection A Multitude of Sins, with small textual variations from the final, published version. No comparable U.S. issue. Signed by the author. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#914980] $80
[NY], Vintage Contemporaries, [1991]. An advance reading excerpt of the first U.S. paperback edition of his fifth book, a novel. Signed by the author. One sheet, eight pages, accordion folded. Fine. [#912564] $70
NY, Knopf, 1997. The uncorrected proof copy of the first trade edition of this collection of three novellas. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#914975] $70
London, Jonathan Cape, (1974). The uncorrected proof copy of the British edition of this collection of novellas. Owner name; near fine in a very good proof dust jacket. [#011456] $150
NY, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, (2001). An advance audio excerpt from his then-forthcoming novel The Corrections, along with excerpts of ten other books in FSG's Fall 2001 line-up. Cassette tape, signed by Franzen on a small label affixed to the printed cardstock sleeve. Fine. The Corrections won the National Book Award and is consistently cited as one of the top books of the 21st century's "new canon." An unusual advance issue for a literary novel, and likely the only signed copy. [#029924] $125
NY, Atlantic Monthly, (1997). The advance reading copy (identified by the publisher as an "uncorrected manuscript") of his first book, a Civil War novel and a publishing phenomenon: after a modest 25,000 copy first printing of the trade edition, the book eventually sold more than a million copies in hardcover and won the National Book Award -- a rare combination of literary and commercial success for any work of fiction, let alone a first novel. Fine in wrappers. [#915002] $200
Toronto, Macmillan, 1985. The uncorrected proof copy of the true first edition of this collection of stories. Although exact numbers are hard to come by, it is increasingly clear that most Canadian proofs are printed in tiny quantities -- often as few as a couple of dozen copies. Fine in wrappers. [#005753] $100
London, Cape, (1977). The uncorrected proof copy of the first British edition of Garcia Marquez's first novel after the worldwide success of One Hundred Years of Solitude. An ambitious, experimental novel: 269 pages in six chapters, each of which is a single paragraph of extended sentences, with each of the chapters a retelling of the story of the power held by his fictional dictator. This copy is inscribed by the author on the half-title: "Para ____ Con todo mi afecto, Gabriel, 2001." Very modest dust soiling to covers; near fine in wrappers. An uncommon proof and especially so signed. [#027204] $1,250
Denver, MacMurray & Beck, (1999). The uncorrected proof copy of his first book, a novel. Short scuff to lower edge of rear cover; still fine in wrappers. [#916199] $100
NY, Hill and Wang, (1972). The uncorrected proof copy of this play by the author of The Connection, who is also known for his association with The Living Theater, an experimental theater group. Notes in text and name of Richard M. Buck on cover. Very good in tall wrappers. Uncommon. [#018598] $70
NY, Knopf, (1970). The uncorrected proof copy of this classic novel, originally published at the turn of the century in France (1902) and first published in English in 1930, here translated by poet Richard Howard. Edge-sunning and a few spots to cover; about near fine in tall, comb-bound wrappers. [#028854] $125
Boston/NY, Houghton Mifflin, 1997. The uncorrected proof copy. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#914013] $70
NY, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, (1979). Subtitled "The Strange Life of an Epithet." This is the uncorrected proof copy. Paper clip imprint front cover; else fine in tall wrappers. [#011837] $60
(Anthology)
Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1988. The uncorrected proof copy of this collection of six talks given at The New York Public Library by Allen Ginsberg, Mary Gordon, Hugh Nissenson, Frederick Buechner, David Bradley and Jaroslav Pelikan. Edited by William Zinsser. An uncommon Ginsberg appearance. Fine in wrappers. [#010846] $70
London, Faber & Faber, (1959). The uncorrected proof copy of the fourth novel by the Nobel Prize winner, author of Lord of the Flies. Bound in light gray wrappers, as opposed to green, and perhaps thus a second state although we don't have any conclusive indication of priority. Near fine. [#005154] $200
NY, Delacorte, (1974). The uncorrected proof copy. Signed by the author. Ink (printer's ink?) to foredge; else fine in wrappers. [#912609] SOLD
(Rock Lyrics)
NY, Bantam, 1969. The uncorrected proof copy of this paperback original. Commentary on the lyrics of seventy rock songs by Goldstein, who was a columnist for The Village Voice. Spine and edge-sunned; about near fine in tall wrappers, with review slip and press release laid in. The proof has a 1968 cover date; publication was February, 1969. [#028821] $80
Athens, University of Georgia Press, (1993). Bound galleys of this critical study of poetry by Vietnam veterans, in which Gotera analyzes poems from a number of the important anthologies of Vietnam war poetry, as well as several individual author's collections. Long, oblong sheets, printed on rectos only. Comb-bound. Near fine in plain cardstock covers. Unusual format, suggesting few were done. [#030868] $125
NY, Picador, (2000). The uncorrected proof copy. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#914033] $80
NY, Riverhead, 2015. The advance reading copy of this novel that was a finalist for the National Book Award and perhaps the most talked-about book of the year, landing, according to the Wall Street Journal, on more best-of-the-year lists than any other title. Amazon.com named it its Book of the Year, and President Obama famously commented that he liked it more than any other book he'd read in the past year. Fine in wrappers. As has become the norm, physical advance reading copies are scarce these days, with much of their promotional function being taken up by digital materials of one sort or another. [#032645] $150
London, Heinemann, (2015). The advance reading copy of the British edition of this novel that was a finalist for the National Book Award and perhaps the most talked-about book of the year, landing, according to the Wall Street Journal, on more best-of-the-year lists than any other title. Amazon.com named it its Book of the Year, and President Obama famously commented that he liked it more than any other book he'd read in the past year. Fine in wrappers. Apparently uncommon; this is the only copy we've seen to date. [#032646] $125
NY, Knopf, 2015. The advance reading copy of Hallberg's 900+ page novel of 1970s New York: his first novel, which brought the author a nearly $2 million dollar advance and saw the film rights sold prior to publication. The advance copy has a letter from the publisher bound in dated March 2015; the book was published in October 2015, and received wide critical praise. The advance reading copy is scarce. Fine in self-wrappers. [#032282] $125
NY, Knopf, 1932. An advance copy of Men in Darkness bound in flexible boards and consisting of "Narrative," the collection's first story, running 117 pages, and the first eight pages of "Feud," the second story, which ran to nearly 80 pages in the finished book. The paper covering the boards is split at the joints; else near fine, lacking the glassine dust jacket. An interesting example of a publishing phenomenon particular to the era. [#023219] $100
(NY), HarperCollins, (1999). An advance copy in the form of velobound typescript with acetate cover. Reduced to 6" x 9". Fine, with a letter to the sales force laid in. [#914074] $70
(NY), HarperCollins, (1991). The uncorrected proof copy. Inscribed by the author to the writer Nicholas Delbanco: "To Nick, with pleasure in your pleasure and hope in your hope. Ron Hansen/ Bread Loaf, 1991." A couple tiny indents near spine; near fine in wrappers. A nice literary association copy. [#029659] $100
London, Hutchinson, (1992). A post-World War II alternate history novel in which Germany won the Second World War. A surprise bestseller and critically acclaimed, this was the author's first work of fiction after a number of nonfiction books. Basis for an Emmy Award-winning HBO movie. This is the advance reading copy in pictorial wrappers, marked "an uncorrected proof from Hutchinson." A bit of rubbing to lower rear edge and dustiness to lower edge of text block; otherwise fine in wrappers and near fine dust jacket. With a faux 1964 newspaper "front page" laid in, postponing the publication of Fatherland from 1964 to 1992, due to the sensitive nature of the material. [#029660] $125
NY, St. Martin's, (1988). The uncorrected proof copy of his highly acclaimed third novel, the first to have Hannibal Lecter as the central character, a figure that has become a cultural touchstone. Basis for the Jonathan Demme film with Anthony Hopkins and Jodie Foster, winner of five Academy Awards and one of the American Film Institute's top 100 Films of the Century. Upper outer corner crease to front cover; thus near fine in wrappers. The advance reading copy is fairly common; the proof is scarce. [#026554] $1,000
NY, Bantam, (1990). The uncorrected proof copy of his second novel, a sequel to The Short-Timers, with several of the same characters, including the title character. Tiny white specks to rear (red) panel; else fine in wrappers. [#000342] $250
San Francisco, City Lights, (1987). Velo-bound page proofs of these stories by women from all over the world about their experiences with war, some in Vietnam, others reaching back prior to World War I or forward to Central America in the 1980s. A powerful collection, published by City Lights and reprinted in 2003 by a university press. Plain cardstock covers. Plastic binding separating at ends. Near fine. Presumably only a very small number would have been printed in this format. [#030869] $200
NY, Viking, (1980). The uncorrected proof copy of this novel that won the National Book Critics Circle Award, 23 years before her next novel, The Great Fire, won the National Book Award, the Miles Franklin Award and the William Dean Howells Medal. Light overall dust soiling and one mark on front cover; near fine in wrappers. [#022712] $80
(n.p.), (Picador), (2000). The advance reading copy of the first British edition of first book, a collection of stories, by a writer from Sarajevo for whom English is a second language. The British edition is the first English language edition, preceding the U.S. This is an intermediate state advance reading copy, lacking the copyright page, but with the information tipped inside the front cover. Fine in wrappers. [#915089] $70
NY, Farrar Straus Giroux, (1970). The uncorrected proof copy of the first American edition of this novel originally published in Germany in 1920. Hesse, who won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1946, received a literary reincarnation of sorts when his books became underground classics of the counterculture in the 1960s: such novels as Steppenwolf, The Journey to the East, Siddhartha and The Glass Bead Game had been long out of print, but were reissued in the Sixties, sometimes in new translations, followed by the first publications in English of a number of his books that had not been issued in the U.S. at all previously, including this title. Near fine in tall, comb-bound wrappers. [#028855] SOLD
(NY), HarperFlamingo, (1999). The uncorrected proof copy of this novel by the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love. Spine and edge sunning; near fine in wrappers. [#013654] $60
NY, Random House, (1976). The uncorrected proof copy of his third collection of essays. Crown bumped and light creasing on the front cover; about near fine in tall wrappers. An uncommon proof, presumably done in small quantities and shot from galley sheets (the page numbers are reproduced in holograph). [#005202] $125
London, Jonathan Cape, (1980). The uncorrected proof copy of this science fiction novel by the author of Turtle Diary and the fantasy classic The Lion of Boaz-Jachin and Jachin Boaz. Chosen as one of David Pringle's 100 best science fiction novels. This was John Fowles' copy, with his blindstamp on the half title. Spine-faded; first 50 pages or so loose from cracked glue, from reading; very good in wrappers. Winner of the John W. Campbell Memorial Award and nominated for a Nebula Award. A notable copy of a major science fiction novel. [#029662] $250
NY, Putnam, (2000). Two copies of the advance reading copy of this novel. The first issue is shot from typescript and bears textual differences (as well as a different cover) from the later, typeset issue. Small bump to crown on the first issue; else both are fine in wrappers. [#027322] $60
(NY), Weisbach/(Morrow), 1999. An advance excerpt from Homes' Music for Torching, together with an interview with Homes, a review, and praise for her earlier books. Also includes excerpts of work by Amanda Davis, Scott Lasser and Dale Peck. Fine in stapled wrappers, with accompanying CD, all housed in publisher's tri-fold folder. A highly unusual, multimedia publisher's promotional item. [#025104] $100
(NY), Riverhead Books, (2001). The advance reading copy of the first American edition of this anthology of stories, edited by Hornby. With contributions by Hornby, Dave Eggers, Roddy Doyle, Irvine Welsh, Zadie Smith, Helen Fielding, and others. Signed by Hornby. Fine in wrappers. [#914143] $70
(NY), Riverhead Books, (2001). An advance reading excerpt of the American edition of this anthology of stories, edited by Hornby. Printing the stories by Hornby, Zadie Smith, and Nick Harris. Signed by Hornby. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#914144] $70
(Toronto), McClelland & Stewart, (1982). Uncorrected proof copy of her first book, winner of Canada's Seal First Novel Award. Light edge-soiling to lower front cover; else near fine in comb-bound cardstock wrappers. [#006426] $70
NY, Norton, (1992). The advance reading copy of her highly praised first book, a collection of stories and a surprise bestseller. One of the stories was selected for The Best American Short Stories 1990. A fine copy in pictorial wrappers. [#006427] $150
NY, Random House, (2007). The uncorrected proof copies of the reissues of two Humes' novels. Unmarked, but from the library of Peter Matthiessen, whom, with Humes, co-founded The Paris Review in the 1950s. Both proofs have the same introduction, by Alan Cheuse, and both mention Matthiessen. Each proof is fine in wrappers. [#031945] $100
NY, Random House, (1994). The uncorrected proof copy, lacking the first page, which contained the publisher's text describing the book and, very briefly, the author, and was excised from most copies, reportedly at the author's request. From the library of author Peter Matthiessen, bearing his notes only on the final page: "Harada Roshi/ 'world is full of dread'/ huge clean wind." Foxed; very good in wrappers. [#032257] $70
(n.p.), (n.p.), [ca. 1997-98]. An advance issue consisting of velobound, double-sided typescript. 743 pages. A very uncommon format -- we've seen this typescript once before, but in a different type of binding. It appears to predate any publisher's production of this title; the earlier copy we had seen had been sent to a U.K. reader whose blurb appeared on the U.K. advance reading copy. Velo binding cracked at the front, missing the bottom third; otherwise near fine. [#032786] $450
NY, Random House, (1998). The uncorrected proof copy of the American trade edition. Printer's mark ("5/") to spine; else fine in wrappers. [#911619] $60
NY, Simon & Schuster, (2012). The advance reading copy. Signed by the author on the title page. Scarce signed even in the trade edition: Irving did not do any signings on his author tour promoting the novel, explaining that he was no longer willing to sign books at readings per his doctor's warnings, as it would hinder his ability to write his manuscripts by hand, as he prefers to do. He did sign a handful of copies of the trade edition at his local bookstore; and he signed some number of bookplates as able. We have seen only one other signed advance copy. Fine in self-wrappers. [#032878] $350
(n.p.), (n.p.), 2000. An early, tapebound typescript of this novel that was published in July, 2001. No publisher indicated, suggesting this was an early agent's copy, or some other kind of copy prepared prior to the publisher issuing any version of it. Double-spaced, double-sided, 507 pages. "Revised: December 11, 2000" printed on the white front cover/title page. Textual differences exist between this and the published text, beginning with a different table of contents and including changes in the Acknowledgments section of the book. We are aware of another state of this draft that was comb-bound, which was issued by Knopf/Canada. Very near fine. [#030737] $450
(n.p.), (n.p.), 2000. An early, tapebound typescript of this novel that was published in July, 2001. No publisher indicated, suggesting this was an early agent's copy, or some other kind of copy prepared prior to the publisher issuing any version of it. Double-spaced, double-sided, 507 pages. "Revised: December 11, 2000" printed on the blue front cover/title page. Textual differences exist between this and the published text, beginning with a different table of contents and including changes in the Acknowledgments section of the book. We are aware of another state of this draft that was comb-bound, which was issued by Knopf/Canada. Fine. [#032787] $500
Toronto, Knopf Canada, (2001). The uncorrected proof copy of the first Canadian edition. Inscribed by Irving on the title page. Fine in wrappers, with the dust jacket art bound in. An uncommon proof copy, and especially scarce signed; we've never seen another one. [#029483] $450
(London), Bloomsbury, (1996). The uncorrected proof copy of the first British edition of this title, which was incorporated into the U.S. edition of Trying to Save Piggy Sneed and had no separate U.S. printing. Inscribed by Irving. Fine in a near fine, proof dust jacket, worn where it overlays the proof, with the price of £13.99 (later lowered to £9.99). An uncommon proof (the British trade edition would have had a proportionally smaller printing than a U.S. one would have had, and the proof equally so), especially with the proof jacket, and even more so signed by Irving. This is the first signed copy of it we have handled. [#029482] $1,000
NY, Random House, (1972). The uncorrected proof copy of Irving's second book. Spine slightly faded, with a short thin "skid mark" on the rear cover; near fine in wrappers. A very uncommon proof, preceding his breakthrough novel, The World According to Garp, by six years, and dating from a period when proofs were not commonly collected, so few will likely have survived. This is the earliest John Irving proof we've seen. [#032779] $750
NY, Dutton, (1978). The advance reading copy of his fourth novel and breakthrough book, which went into numerous printings, became a multi-million copy bestseller and a National Book Award winner in its paperback release. The first printing of Garp was reported at 35,000 copies; none of Irving's previous books had sold even 5,000 copies, with one of them having had sales under 2000. Irving switched publishers for this book, and his new publisher decided to promote the novel heavily. After issuing two sets of proofs in small numbers for early readers and reviewers, Dutton printed this advance reading copy for wide distribution to the book trade. It worked in bringing attention to Irving's novel, which became a bestseller; since then, Irving's books have had six-figure first printings and his reputation as a major American novelist is secure. The publisher's risk, in producing such a large first printing, and their marketing efforts -- including creating this advance copy -- played no small part in this transformation. This copy is signed by the author. Spine creased and faded; light spotting; near fine in wrappers. [#023441] $900
On Sale: $630
NY, Dutton, (1978). The second issue of the uncorrected proof copy, in tall green wrappers. Erasures and label removal shadow on the front cover; small label affixed to spine; near fine. Not as scarce as the mustard-colored proof, but many times scarcer than the white advance reading copy. [#032782] $1,000
NY, Random House, (2005). The uncorrected proof copy. Shallow spine dent; else fine in wrappers. [#911627] $60
NY, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, (1980). Folded and gathered sheets of this posthumous collection of Jarrell's essays and reviews, spanning the years 1935-1964. Edge-sunned, a little spotting and creasing to the last page; near fine. Jarrell, a poet and also the author of one novel and several children's books, was highly respected for his incisive criticism. A scarce advance issue of this collection. [#012861] $150
NY, Knopf, 1987. The uncorrected proof copy of his fourth collection of poetry. Small stain on lower rear cover otherwise fine in wrappers. [#024363] $80
(NY), Amistad, (2003). The advance reading copy of the author's second book, first novel, about a mixed-race plantation owner and slaveholder in antebellum Virginia. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. Inscribed by the author. Fine in self-wrappers. [#029988] $100
Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1985. Both the first edition and the uncorrected proof copy; both from the library of Peter Matthiessen, who makes several appearances in the text, including digging the hole at the gravesite for Jones's ashes. The book is very good in a very good dust jacket with a Compliments of Houghton Mifflin card laid in; the proof is near fine in wrappers. [#031954] $100
Boston, Little Brown, (1993). The uncorrected proof copy of his first book, a highly praised collection of stories that was nominated for the National Book Award. Signed by the author in 1994. Fine in wrappers, with publicist's card stapled to the front cover. [#915203] $100
NY, Holt Rinehart Winston, (1979). Uncorrected proof copy of her fourth collection of poetry. Name in marker half blotted out on front wrapper (presumably the reviewer to whom the book was assigned); overall very good and inscribed by the author "with love". [#001604] $55
NY, Holt Rinehart Winston, (1973). The uncorrected proof copy of her second collection of poetry. Jong's breakthrough novel, Fear of Flying, published the same year as this collection, redefined the parameters for acceptable commercial fiction in the wake of the newfound freedoms of the Sixties and the women's movement, so much so that its title became a byword, and a part of the vernacular of contemporary political discussion. Inscribed by the author. Fine in tall wrappers with review slip laid in. [#008584] $175
[NY], [Holt Rinehart Winston], 1975. A personalized advance copy of her third collection of poetry. Photocopied pages shot from an uncorrected proof copy, warmly inscribed by the author, and with one poem, "Advice to Myself After Losing My Wallet," crossed out, apparently by Jong. Together with an autograph note signed, on personal stationery, transmitting the sheets and thanking the recipient for some Nabokov books. All items fine in a torn, hand-addressed, postage due envelope. An interesting item from the author of the landmark novel Fear of Flying. [#015617] $250
London, Jonathan Cape, (1966). The uncorrected proof copy of the first British edition of her first book. Kael revolutionized film criticism with her opinionated, colloquial reviews, her wit, her enjoyment of popular culture, and her impatience with pretentiousness. A generation of admirers and imitators has never quite succeeded in matching the engaging informality and authority of Kael's reviewing voice. A bit of white out inside front cover and penciled name on flyleaf; light foxing; near fine in a very good, proof dust jacket with tape-mended chips at the spine ends. An uncommon book, and an even more uncommon proof. [#024745] $250
NY, Harper & Row, (1980). An uncorrected proof copy of the author's second book, first novel. Near fine in wrappers. Inscribed by the author and dated in October of 19 79, three months prior to publication. [#010677] $70
NY, Viking, (1983). The uncorrected proof copy of his Pulitzer Prize-winning book, the third title in his Albany sequence. Signed by the author. Near fine in wrappers, with a two-page letter from the publisher to a reviewer at the Chicago Tribune laid in, appending a copy of a blurb by Doris Grumbach. Ironweed was the basis for the award-winning 1987 Hector Babenco film, for which Kennedy wrote the screenplay. It starred Jack Nicholson and Meryl Streep, both of whom earned Oscar nominations for their performances. A nice copy of a scarce issue of the book that may stand as Kennedy's magnum opus: in addition to the Pulitzer, it was listed as one of the Modern Library's 100 great novels of the 20th century. [#032622] $450
NY, Coward McCann, (1975). The uncorrected proof copy of the first book of Kennedy's Albany sequence. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers but for mild spine fading; title written on spine. Publisher's slip written for advance readers and reviewers laid in. Kennedy's Albany Cycle has now reached eight volumes and is one of the most highly regarded fictional series of contemporary American literature. A very uncommon proof, especially signed. [#032621] $750
(n.p.), Viking, (1988). Uncorrected proof copy of this historical novel by the author of the Pulitzer-Prize winning Ironweed. Fine in wrappers, and inscribed by the author. [#010690] $100
(n.p.), Viking, (1987). The uncorrected proof copy of this collection of short pieces, both fiction and nonfiction -- the fiction often being thinly disguised nonfiction, with just the names of characters changed; the nonfiction, on the other hand, often lapses into stories of imaginary characters: Kesey was a consummate storyteller, and twice found himself unable to conclude a "simple" journalistic assignment for Running magazine without inventing a fictional story arc to contain his description of events. Demon Box shows both the inventive writing style of Kesey's superb first two novels and the recalcitrant and rebellious attitude of Kesey's iconic counterculture persona. At this point, he had still not written a novel -- or at least published one -- since Sometimes a Great Notion in 1964, which coincided with his famous cross-country trip with the Merry Pranksters in the school bus named "Furthur." Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#032655] SOLD
(n.p.), Viking, (2002). The advance reading copy of the 40th anniversary edition of Kesey's landmark novel of the 1960s, here with a new introduction, and illustrations, by the author. Publication was slated for January, 2002; Kesey died in November, 2001, a fact not reflected in the cover text. Given the advance time associated with such prepublication productions, and their primary purpose -- to get copies of the book to reviewers with long lead times, in order that reviews can be ready by publication day -- the introduction in this advance copy is probably the last original piece of Kesey's writing to be published in his lifetime. Mild splaying to covers, else fine in wrappers. [#032881] $125
(NY), Viking, (1991). The uncorrected proof copy of this children's book, which was illustrated by Neil Waldman. Together with unbound signatures in trial dust jacket and actual dust jacket. Also together with an 8-1/2 x 11 pictorial poster announcing a Ken Kesey "Sea Lion story telling performance" presented by the Naropa Institute at the Boulder Theater. The advance copies are fine; the poster is very good. [#031415] $350
[NY], Scribner/Simon & Schuster Audio, 1998. An advance promotional cassette for this novel that was positioned by King's publisher as more of a mainstream novel and love story than the kind of horror novel the author is most famous for. On the tape, King talks about the novel and reads a preview. Likely listened to, but near fine or better in the publisher's cardstock cassette case. With the card of a Scribner publicity director laid in. [#030298] $150
Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1988. The uncorrected proof copy of the first American edition of this collection of baseball stories. Fine in wrappers. [#029794] $100
Port Townsend, Copper Canyon, 1984. The uncommon uncorrected proof copy of these "poems for women." Stapled sheets with a black tape spine. A low-tech production, suggesting very few were done. Kizer won the Pulitzer Prize the following year, for her collection Yin. Fine, with publisher's promotional sheet laid in. [#014851] $125
(NY), Harper & Row, (1962). The uncorrected proof copy of this novel. Cocked, with cover creasing and rubbing to the folds; very good in wrappers. [#028665] $60
NY, St. Martin's, (1979). The uncorrected proof copy of the seventh novel by the author of The Painted Bird, among others. This book was published just before the scandal broke wherein Kosinski was accused of letting his students or paramours ghost-write his own novels. Fine in tall wrappers. [#027642] $55
Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1976. The uncorrected proof copy of the revised second edition of his first book, here with a new introduction (titled "Afterward") by the author. Signed by Kosinski on the title page, and additionally inscribed by him on the first blank: "For ___ and ___ - ten years after,/ affectionately, Jerzy/ Feb 1976." Light bump to spine base, else fine in wrappers. His powerful -- and later controversial -- first novel, of the Holocaust. Part of the controversy around this book stemmed from Kosinski's originally implying that it was an autobiographical novel, and the experiences of the main character -- a gypsy child wandering around Eastern Europe during the war -- were based on his own experiences. After publication he refrained from making such claims publicly, but even in the new introduction here, ten years after the original publication, he strongly implies that his childhood experiences in the war were of the devastating variety that the book's protagonist underwent. The Painted Bird, despite all the controversy surrounding it, was named by Time magazine in 2005 as one of the top 100 novels from 1923-2005. Kosinski, hounded by controversy and scandal, committed suicide in 1991 at the age of 57. An uncommon proof, especially warmly inscribed. [#032301] $375
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New Arrivals Catalog 168