E-list # 137

Advance Copies

NY, Knopf, 2002. Unbound photocopied typeset sheets of this collection of 140 of Lane's reviews and criticism from The New Yorker. More than 700 pages; printed on rectos only; stamped "Page Proofs" in lower corners. From the office of a U.K. literary agency, so presumably this copy of the sheets was used in preparation of the U.K. edition of this title. Trifle edge-ruffling; else fine. [#022974] $100
Baltimore, CD Publications, 1996. The uncorrected proof copy. Fine in wrappers. [#031274] $70
Holyoke, Crossroads Press, 1999. The uncorrected proof copy of this limited edition. Signed by the author. Comb-bound with both printed and acetate covers. Stamp of Stanley Wiater on half title; near fine in wrappers. Scarce. [#029498] $150
NY, Bantam, (1989). The uncorrected proof copy. Inscribed by the author to Stanley Wiater prior to publication: "For Stan the Man -- My last sequel." Wiater's bookplate inside the front cover; edge-sunned with small crown bump; near fine in wrappers. [#029495] $70
Baltimore, CD, 1994. The uncorrected proof copy. Fine in wrappers. With a colophon of the limited edition, signed by Lansdale and the illustrator Mark A. Nelson laid in. Note: the proof does not include Nelson's illustration. [#031298] $100
Boston, Little Brown, (1976). The uncorrected proof copy of the first American edition of this novel based on the disappearance of two American journalists, Sean Flynn and Dana Stone, who disappeared in Cambodia during the Vietnam war. Larteguy is most famous for his two volumes on the Algerian war, The Centurions and The Praetorians. Near fine in wrappers with a short tear at the upper front joint. [#028669] SOLD
Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1991. The advance reading copy of his second book, like his first an exploration of place but in this case, rather than an extended road trip, the author focuses on one small section of Kansas. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#016715] $70
NY, Knopf, 1984. The first book, a highly praised collection of stories, by the author of the controversial While England Sleeps, among others. This is the uncorrected proof copy. Light, faint staining to rear cover; near fine in wrappers. [#006469] $60
NY, Little Brown, 2003. An advance copy, in the form of comb-bound photocopied typescript. The book was formally published by Little Brown in 2004 with different cover art than that used here. Fine. [#911678] $70
London, Hodder & Stoughton, (1971). The uncorrected proof copy of his first novel to depart from the espionage genre, a book that he later said was his own personal favorite of his books, but which enjoyed considerably less popular success than his spy stories. Small ink name and date on front cover; minor sunning and creasing to spine; near fine in wrappers. Scarce in collectable condition. [#018112] $500
NY, Knopf, 1989. An advance copy of the first American edition in the form of bound 8-1/2" x 11" galley sheets. Fine. [#911660] $175
NY, Riverhead Books, 1999. An uncorrected proof copy in the form of comb-bound 8-1/2" x 11" sheets, printed on rectos only. 348 pages. Signed by the author. Fine. [#913239] $100
(London), Faber and Faber, (2009). The advance reading copy of the first British edition, which was only published in paperback. Several tiny edge nicks; near fine in wrappers. An uncommon advance copy. [#028255] $60
NY, Viking, (1975). The uncorrected proof copy of his first novel, winner of the Ernest Hemingway Foundation Award. Set in Vietnam in 1964 among a group of Green Beret advisors in a small Vietnamese hamlet. "Senior Center Library" stamps to all page edges; else fine in wrappers. The published price was changed from the price indicated on the proof. Not a proof we have seen often. [#010101] $150
Seattle, Jawbone Press, 1981. The uncorrected proof copy. Signed by the author. Near fine in wrappers. [#913626] $100
NY, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, (1978). The uncorrected proof copy of a posthumously published play, which Lowell "translated" from other translations, in an attempt to recapture what he imagined the initial impact of the play would have been to its original audience. Fine in wrappers. [#014871] SOLD
NY, Random House, (1984). The uncorrected proof copy of this novel that was a surprise winner of the Pulitzer Prize. Near fine in wrappers. Uncommon. [#014541] $125
Boston/NY, Houghton Mifflin, 2010. The advance reading copy of Machart's well-received first novel. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers, with a cover blurb by Tim O'Brien. [#032801] $70
London, Cassell, [1932]. The uncorrected proof copy of this memoir of the author's time in Greece during World War I, during which time he worked for the British intelligence service MI6, eventually becoming the head of the Aegean Intelligence Service. The memoir was suppressed upon publication as a violation of the Official Secrets Act, and Mackenzie was fined. In the book he revealed for the first time the existence of the SIS (Secret Intelligence Service) and was highly critical of particular individuals. As a result, he was later placed on MI5's watch list, and his activities were monitored by the British domestic intelligence service. The book was republished in 1939 without fanfare. Spine slant; initials to rear cover; staining and bookstore (?) label to front cover; good in wrappers. Few copies of the 1932 edition survived; proof copies are especially uncommon. [#027408] $1,500
NY, Random House, (1998). The uncorrected proof copy of this omnibus collection, published on the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of The Naked and the Dead. "Selections by Mailer of his best work, ingeniously arranged as a literary retrospective." Signed by Mailer and with a foreword by him. Massive, over 1200 pages. Publication date written on spine; slight rubbing to the front spine fold; still fine in wrappers. Uncommon signed. [#027411] $250
[NY], Farrar, Straus & Giroux, [1979]. A proof copy of the dust jacket (jacket only, no book) for this Malamud novel, printing the front cover and spine only, with the title in a pale green that was later changed to yellow. Together with a copy of the finished jacket, with the yellow lettering, author photo and flap text. Each folded flat, else fine. [#019698] $70
Berkeley/NY, El Leon Literary Arts/Atlantic Monthly, (2010). The advance reading copy (labeled "Uncorrected Proof") of the first El Leon/Atlantic Monthly edition of his first novel, after an initial El Leon print run of 1200 that was bought up by Atlantic Monthly when they agreed to a 60,000 copy print run. Signed by the author. This is the later state advance reading copy, with the Matterhorn title. There was an earlier state advance reading copy with the title Some Desperate Glory: most of those were destroyed. Fine in pictorial wrappers. [#029016] SOLD
NY, Harper & Row, (1982). A small archive of publishing materials for Mason's third book and first work of fiction, including:
  • The "Author's Galleys." 247 typeset pages, reproducing copyeditor's corrections and with Mason's holograph corrections, mostly in the later stories. Many of her changes correct errors, but some show small rewrites. Loose sheets; near fine.
  • "Author's notes to Copyeditors," a two-page computer printout of nearly two dozen justifications for changes Mason does not want made (defending "goosebumps," "St. Louis," "youngun," "golly-bill," etc., with such explanations as: "Tears don't really fall, they run down the face and neck onto the breasts. This is perfectly possible while lying down." Also present are a handful of small handwritten notes (by editors) that appear to be tracking such things as proper names, trademarks, contractions, and copyrights.
  • A typed letter signed by Mason to Ted Solotaroff at Harper & Row, dated April 8, 1982, apologizing for sounding snippy and impersonal in her notes to the copyeditors and for being "a little fussy" about a few of her preferences. There is also a paragraph defending "Bombay chicken" as a recipe, as opposed to "Bombay duck." She also, apparently referring to proposed jacket copy, changes K-Mart managers to clerks; says she's not sure the collection has any college-educated divorcees; and says, "I don't recall any story about two bored housewives on a joyride to Nashville." Fine, on personal stationery.
  • The uncorrected proof copy. In two of the stories, small textual differences exist between this proof and the published book. (In all but one instance that we found, Mason attempted to correct these "errors" in her page proofs.) Fine in wrappers.
  • Folded and gathered sheets, i.e. unbound page signatures of the finished book. Mild foxing to half title; else fine.
  • The first edition. Inscribed by the author in the month prior to publication: "To Dorian/ With appreciation, Bobbie Ann Mason/ Oct. 5-82." Near fine in a very good dust jacket with some ink added to cover the rubbing to the spine.
A nice archive, documenting some of the work that went into Mason's ground-breaking Kentucky K-Mart fiction, with an added bit of foreshadowing: the last line of Mason's letter to Solotaroff reads: "I'm reading too many books on Vietnam -- it's depressing!" Mason's Vietnam-themed novel In Country would be published in 1984. [#031718] $1,250
(Springfield), Gauntlet, (1999). The advance reading copy. Stamp of another author on specifications page, faint foxing to top edge; else fine in wrappers. [#031027] $100
NY, Random House, (1965). Matthiessen's own copy of the advance reading copy of his fourth novel, marked by Matthiessen, apparently for a reading. A portion of an index card has page numbers written in Matthiessen's hand, identifying five sections that are marked off, by Matthiessen, spanning the entire text: the opening paragraphs; three middle sections; and the final pages. Otherwise unmarked, but from Matthiessen's library. Foxing to endpages and page edges; spine creased; very good in wrappers. [#032341] $500
Boston, Shambhala, 1986. The uncorrected proof copy of these Zen journals spanning the years 1969-1982. Unmarked, but from the library of Peter Matthiessen. Very good in wrappers. [#032021] $70
London, Heinemann, (1962). The uncorrected proof copy of the first British edition of his third novel. Signed by the author. Matthiessen was one of the very few authors who has won the National Book Award for both fiction and nonfiction. His novel after this one, At Play in the Fields of the Lord, a National Book Award nominee, represented a significant jump from this book in terms of literary accomplishment. The book prior to this, Wildlife in America, started him on the path toward becoming one of our most highly regarded writers of natural history. This short novel, a tale of the sea that is reminiscent of Conrad, dates from an early period in Matthiessen's career and is uncommon even in the U.S. trade edition. This is the only copy of the British proof we have handled. Spine-sunned, else fine in wrappers. [#015912] $750
Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1989. The uncorrected proof copy. From Matthiessen's library and including his contribution from The Wind Birds. Spine-sunned; very good in wrappers. [#032416] $70
NY, Macmillan, 1994. An advance copy, in the form of velobound typeset pages. With Matthiessen's markings, underlinings and a couple of his notes in the text. Matthiessen provided a jacket blurb for the finished book, and the markings indicate a close and thorough reading of the text. Cover stained; velobinding detaching. Very good. [#032423] $200
NY, Random House, (1982). The uncorrected proof copy. From the library of Peter Matthiessen and with his markings and a few notes in the text and on the rear cover, and with the author's address written in a different hand on the "About the Author" page. Several of Matthiessen's annotations mark passages referring to legendary Sioux leader Crazy Horse; Matthiessen's book about the Wounded Knee siege, In the Spirit of Crazy Horse, was published the previous year. Very good in wrappers. [#032410] $150
NY, Knopf, 1971. The uncorrected proof copy of his first book of nonfiction, a personal essay and reminiscence. Maxwell is best known for his highly acclaimed fiction, both novels and short stories, and also for being the fiction editor of The New Yorker for nearly 40 years. A fragile, padbound proof in tall wrappers. A few marginal pencil marks. Missing the rear cover, thus only good. [#028861] $125
NY, Ballantine, (1985). First Ballantine edition. Inscribed by the author. Recipient's stamp inside the front cover. Foxing to top edge, 1/4" chip at upper outer front cover. Very good in wrappers. Together with an advance reading excerpt of the novel as published by Holt Rinehart and Winston in 1984, which is near fine in stapled wrappers. [#031034] ON HOLD
$100
NY, Knopf, 2005. The advance reading copy of this novel of drugs and violence set in the contemporary Southwest, the film adaptation of which won four Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director. Fine in wrappers. [#911693] SOLD
NY, Knopf, 1994. The uncorrected proof copy of the sequel to All the Pretty Horses, and the second novel in The Border Trilogy. Fine in wrappers. [#911683] $150
NY, Turtle Bay Books, (1993). The uncorrected proof copy of her first book, a collection of stories. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#914548] $100
NY, Grove Press, (2002). The uncorrected proof copy of his first book. Signed by the 17 year-old author. Fine in wrappers. [#915322] $70
NY, Knopf, 1971. The uncorrected proof copy. Inscribed by the author. Near fine in tall, padbound wrappers. A fragile format; it is unlikely that more than a handful can have survived. [#005326] $475
NY, Harcourt Brace World, (1966). The uncorrected proof copy of his uncommon first book. Title on spine in marker; very good in wrappers. [#006670] $150
NY, Knopf, 1974. The uncorrected proof copy. Inscribed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#005327] $375
NY, Farrar Straus Giroux, (1980). The uncorrected proof copy of this collection of essays on sport, particularly hunting and fishing. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#911709] $275
NY, Farrar Straus Giroux, (1978). The second issue uncorrected proof copy. Signed by the author. Reviewer (?) name on front cover; crease to rear cover; near fine in light gray wrappers. [#911706] $200
NY, Random House, (1984). The uncorrected proof copy. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#911714] $250
NY, Knopf, 2002. The advance reading copy of the British edition. Fine in wrappers. [#911744] $60
NY, Dutton, (1986). A limited advance reading excerpt, printing only the title story. One of 250 copies printed. Signed by McGuane. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#911718] $80
NY, Dutton, (1986). The uncorrected proof copy of this collection of stories. Signed by the author. Trace sunning to spine; still fine in wrappers. [#911717] $100
NY, Henry Holt, (2008). Two items: first, the first edition, a paperback original, of this collection of essays by the author of The End of Nature, among others. With a new introduction by the author. Signed by McKibben. And second: the uncorrected proof copy, dated 2007, and including six essays that were not included in the finished book. An announcement of the expected change in contents is affixed to the front cover, as is a label announcing a 2008 publication date. In addition to the presence of these six essays, the proof differs from the published text at least by small changes in the titles of a few of the essays. McKibben's The End of Nature, published in 1989, was the first book for general audiences on the science of global warming and climate change. McKibben has since become one of the most outspoken and visible activists against climate change, founding the organization 350.org, which is now active in nearly 200 countries. The proof copy of this collection is fine in wrappers; the book has a small owner name and date on the flyleaf; otherwise it is also fine in wrappers. An uncommon proof, and also a book that is uncommon signed. [#032890] $300
(NY), Simon & Schuster, 2002. An advance copy in the form of tapebound photocopied typescript, reproducing the author's corrections. 501 double-spaced pages, printed on both sides. Fine in cardstock covers. [#913323] $175
(n.p.), (Farrar Straus Giroux), (n.d.)[1968]. Printer's sample pages. One 10-3/4" x 8" sheet, printed on both sides to make four pages, with the text of pp. 99-101 on three of them and the detailed specifications on type and setup on the fourth. Fine. Uncommon production materials for an early McPhee book from the 1960s. [#013294] $100
NY, Random House, (1976). The uncorrected proof copy of this compendium of pieces on railroads, a number of them written by McPherson, who had originally contracted to write a whole book on the subject, a project which evolved into this one, not altogether to the author's liking, according to his later comments. A small quarto, heavily illustrated, somewhat uncommon now even in the trade edition and scarce in proof form. Fine in wrappers. Published the year before Elbow Room. [#001068] $250
NY, Morrow, (1991). The uncorrected proof copy. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#913327] $100
NY, Riverhead, (2009). The uncorrected proof copy of the author's fourth book, second collection of stories, which was selected by the New York Times as one of the ten best books of the year, in all categories. Meloy's first collection won a PEN/Malamud Award, and Granta named her one of the 21 "Best Young American Novelists" in 2007. Fine in wrappers. [#031454] $60
(Toronto), McClelland & Stewart, (1996). An advance copy, in the form of comb-bound galleys, typeset but reproducing several holograph corrections. Her third book, first novel, which was first published in Canada, and only in wrappers. Winner of the Orange Prize for Fiction, the Guardian Prize for Fiction, the Books in Canada First Novel Award and the Trillium Prize. Signed by the author. 9" x 11". Fine. [#915362] $650
NY, Crown, (1996). The uncorrected proof copy of the author's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel. Fine in wrappers. [#004243] $60
NY, Knopf, 1977. The uncorrected proof copy of the second novel by the author of Edwin Mullhouse and the Pulitzer Prize winner, Martin Dressler. Small crack in wrapper at the lower spine; light overall dust soiling; near fine in tall wrappers. [#008233] $80
NY, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, (1982). The uncorrected proof copy of the first American edition of this collection of essays by the Nobel Prize winner. Fine in tall wrappers. [#017905] $70
NY, Dutton, (1986). The uncorrected proof copy of her first book, a well-received novel that was quickly reprinted. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#913333] $175
NY, Simon & Schuster, (1974). The uncorrected proof copy of her first book, a novel. Warmly inscribed by the author on the front cover: "_____ -/ Wise little book to fall/ into such good hands/ From/ Grace." Near fine in tall, padbound wrappers; a scarce and fragile format. [#008235] $150
NY, St. Martin's, 1992. The uncorrected proof copy of this collection of stories and poems from 1961 to 1991. An earlier limited edition by Rydal Press printed a portion of this collection. Signed by the author. Publicist's card stapled inside the front cover; fine in wrappers. [#025624] $175
(n.p.), Little Brown, (n.d.). An advance excerpt of the American edition. Prints only the title story. Signed by the author. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#911761] $100
Boston, Godine, (1979). The uncorrected proof copy of her first book, a collection of stories that won an award from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters. Spine and lower rear panel abraded from label removal; still about near fine in wrappers. Signed by the author. [#006530] $125
[Las Vegas], [Rainmaker Editions], [2002]. Proof sheets, consisting of two frameable leaves, from the limited edition of this collection of five poems by Morrison with illustrations by Kara Walker. Two leaves only: the first carries the third stanza of "Eve Remembering" and is blank on the verso; the second features Walker's art work, with the title page of "The Perfect Ease of Grain" on the verso. "Proof" in pencil in bottom margin. Slight corner crease to the leaf with text; else fine. A notable collaboration between two of the most highly regarded African-American women in their respective arts -- Morrison a Nobel Prize winner in Literature and Walker a visual artist using the silhouette as a form, who was the youngest recipient ever of a MacArthur grant when she received one in 1997 at the age of 28; she was selected by Time magazine in 2007 as one of the 100 most influential figures of our time. The original silhouette for one of the images in this collaboration with Morrison sold at auction for over $30,000. The edition for which this is a proof sheet was limited to 425 copies; it seems safe to assume that far fewer proofs were done -- probably a tiny handful. [#029264] SOLD
(NY), (Harper & Row), (1971). Long galley sheets of this novel, with copyediting/proofreading marks throughout. Folded once, otherwise fine. Scarce. [#011565] $100
(NY), (Viking), (2006). Two volumes: signed copies of both the advance reading copy and the first edition. The first edition is signed by Mortenson; the advance reading copy is signed by both Mortenson and David Relin. Textual differences exist between the advance copy and the first edition. An inspirational, then infamous, account of Mortenson's quest to build schools in Pakistan (and later Afghanistan) in response to kindnesses bestowed on him by locals while he was lost in Pakistan after an unsuccessful ascent of K2, a quest that led to his founding the Central Asia Institute and to a still-ongoing effort that has resulted, to date, in the building of more than 190 schools. The hardcover edition sold only 20,000 copies; the paperback sold over four million copies in more than 40 countries and stayed on The New York Times bestseller list for more than four years, until, in 2011, author Jon Krakauer revealed on 60 Minutes that Mortenson and Relin had taken liberties with the narrative and, in Mortenson's case, liberties with his financial relationship to the Central Asia Institute. The book is uncommon in the first printing, and with the original subtitle which referred to terrorism rather than to peace. This is the only copy of the advance reading copy we have seen. The first edition is signed by Mortenson, who has added the word "Peace!" The advance reading copy is signed by Mortenson and by Relin, who at one point claimed sole authorship of the book, saying it was published with Mortenson as co-author over his objections. Relin committed suicide the year after the controversy broke. The advance reading copy has a mild corner tap and slight cover splaying and is very near fine. The first edition is fine in a fine dust jacket, with a ticket and a program for a Mortenson reading (of the sequel, Stones Into Schools) laid in. Each book has a custom clamshell case. A bestselling story of a Nobel Peace Prize-nominated attempt to achieve peace through education, flawed only by being more inspirational than true. [#032663] $1,000
NY, Kodansha, (1994). The advance reading copy of the first American edition of Murakami's third novel and fourth book to be published in English. Fine in wrappers. [#915438] $100
NY, Knopf, 1997. The uncorrected proof copy. Unmarked, but from the library of Peter Matthiessen. Slight fade and slant to spine, one staple and a couple spots to cover; looks gently read; near fine in wrappers. [#032123] SOLD
[Boston/NY], [Houghton Mifflin], [1997]. Comb-bound photocopied typescript of his first novel, set in Indochina in the 1940s, and based in part on the author's family history. 274 pages, double-spaced and double-sided. No publication information. In yellow cardstock covers with the early title Tian's Music. Fine. [#010156] $60
NY, Phaedra, 1965. An advance copy of this short novel by the author of Lolita. Plain white wrappers laid into the finished dust jacket, which is slightly spine-darkened and chipped at the top edge around the spine. A fine copy in a very good dust jacket. A "compliments of the publisher" card is laid in, with the publisher's old address crossed out by hand and the new one written in. [#028863] $150
(London), Deutsch, (1975). A novel set in an unidentified post-colonial Caribbean island, based on the author's native Trinidad, which the New York Times Book Review called the best novel of the year, and which was the Nobel Prize winner's "breakthrough" book in terms of his dealing with political, social, and personal issues in a critical, fully mature, and nuanced way: no one else was writing about these kinds of ethnically-driven political and social issues with the personal experience, insight, critical capacity and articulateness of Naipaul up to that time, wherein every cultural assumption was called into question and subject to critical scrutiny, and neither the status quo nor its politically correct inverse was allowed to go unexamined and unremarked upon. This is the uncorrected proof copy of the first edition, issued in the UK and dated the 21st of February, 1975. Spine slanted, and title and author written on the spine in red ink. A near fine copy of an extremely uncommon proof of a milestone book in the author's career, which may be seen as putting him fully onto the trajectory that led to the Nobel. [#032697] $550
(London), Picador, (2001). The signed limited uncorrected proof of the British edition, according to the cover text, although this copy is not signed. Long, shallow vertical crease to cover, else fine in wrappers. [#018992] $70
(London), Deutsch, (1963). The uncorrected proof copy of this early novel by the Nobel Prize winner, his fifth book. Small ink number on summary page; modest creasing and edge-sunning to covers; very good in wrappers. Naipaul proofs from this era are scarce; this is the only proof of this title we've seen. [#023015] $750
NY, Vanguard, (1959). The uncorrected proof copy of the first American edition of the Nobel Prize winner's first novel, published two years after its appearance in the U.K. Naipaul is a Trinidadian author of Indian descent, one of the giants of contemporary English literature, and one of the most astute, if acerbic, Western commentators on Third World issues. Spine and a bit of the lower rear edge darkened, apparently from binder's glue rather than sun; some light dustiness to covers and a few gentle turns to page corners; very good in wrappers. An exceedingly scarce proof, by all appearances produced from the text block of the U.K. edition, bound in plain blue wrappers, with the U.S. publisher's label affixed to the front cover. This proof dates from the period when proofs were not routinely produced, which explains the use of the U.K. edition as an "American proof." Bound proofs in that era were little-known publishing artifacts, and were seldom saved, let alone filtered into the rare book market. We've only ever seen one other copy. [#028479] $2,500
NY, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, (1972). The uncorrected proof copy of this long poem based on the life and death of a Chilean highwayman in California in the 1850s. Bilingual edition. Near fine in tall wrappers, with a near fine copy of the dust jacket. [#019261] $125
NY, Dutton, 1970. Folded and gathered sheets of his fourth book and first of nonfiction, a memoir of his political awakening in the late 1950s and early 1960s, which led to an active involvement in the Civil Rights movement and the movement against the war in Vietnam. Inscribed by the author in 1976. Fine, partially stapled into a very good dust jacket. Neugeboren has more recently written more nonfiction, recounting his brother's battle with mental illness and his own experience of open heart surgery: both received extensive critical praise. [#012941] $125
(n.p.), Crown, (2000/2001). An advance copy, in the form of a tapebound typscript (computer printout, double-spaced, double-sided). Laid in is a typed letter signed from Nicosia to Peter Matthiessen, requesting a quote from him to use as publicity. Nicosia also says he would like to talk to him about a future book, about Mumia Abu-Jamal "and the war on people of color that is being waged by our justice system." Quotes from other writers about Home to War have been laid in as well. Small tape repair lower spine; near fine in an acetate cover. [#032128] $80
NY, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, (1978). The uncorrected proof copy of a posthumously published early diary, beginning when Nin was 11 years old. Paperclip impression rear cover; else fine in tall wrappers. [#019978] $80
NY, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, (1976). The uncorrected proof copy. Publicity information heavily glued to the inside front cover and first leaf, with some bleed-through on the latter. Near fine in tall wrappers. This was the last book of Nin's journals to be published while she was still alive. [#028866] $100
[n.p.], [ca. 1972-1980]. The manuscript drafts and galleys for Craig Nova's first three novels -- Turkey Hash, which won the Harper Saxton Prize; The Geek, which William Gass compared favorably to John Hawkes, and Hawkes compared favorably to Celine; and Incandescence, a noir fiction that John Irving called "the funniest and saddest good novel in recent times," and "the best novel about someone 'on the lam' since Donleavy's The Ginger Man." Nova has more recently been praised for a series of highly literary thrillers, but his early novels were more extravagant, highly praised for their inventiveness, their humor, and their darkness. This collection of manuscripts includes multiple drafts of the manuscripts of each book -- including several drafts of Incandescence with its original title of Mungo -- as well as multiple sets of edited galley proofs. In addition, copies of all three books are included: the copy of The Geek is inscribed by the author to legendary book collector Carter Burden, in whose collection these manuscripts resided. A detailed list available on request; all items near fine or better. [#032709] $15,000
NY, Vanguard, (1976). The uncorrected proof copy. Fine in tall wrappers. A scarce and fragile issue. [#020450] $70
NY, Norton, (1995). The uncorrected proof copy of the first American edition of this nonfiction overview of life in the 18th century British navy, intended in part as a companion volume to his Aubrey/Maturin series. Small thin quarto, heavily illustrated (although the proof reproductions are of poor quality). One slight corner crease; else fine in wrappers. [#014909] $70
[Santa Barbara], Neville, [1980]. The galley sheets of O'Brien's first limited edition, which contains an introduction and a chapter that was excised from Going After Cacciato and later appeared, in a much reworked version, in The Things They Carried. O'Brien won the National Book Award for Going After Cacciato, a magical-realist novel of the Vietnam war, and The Things They Carried -- an award-winning collection of related short fictions of the war -- is widely considered one of the best, if not the best, of the literary works to have come out of that war and has become part of the canon, by virtue of its inclusion in both high school and college literary reading lists. Eight long galley sheets, plus one duplicate. 7-1/2" x 19". Signed by O'Brien. Fine. Bibliographically interesting in that the galleys contain the typesetting for all the versions of the colophon, thus indicating all those for whom special copies of the publication were created. [#030132] $750
NY, Knopf, 1985. The uncorrected proof copy of O'Brien's fourth novel, about a man compelled to dig a bomb shelter in his back yard to protect his family even if it means losing them in the process. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#911797] $100
NY, Broadway Books, (1998). The uncorrected proof copy, in white wrappers. Much scarcer than the advance reading copy in pictorial wrappers. Signed by the author in the year of publication. Fine in wrappers. [#911810] $175
NY, Knopf, 1993. The uncorrected proof copy. One of the most highly praised first novels of the year, a black comedy of the peacetime army that was compared to Catch-22 and "Sergeant Bilko on scag." O'Connor was chosen, on the strength of this volume, as one of the Granta 20. Fine in wrappers. [#914241] $100
NY, Knopf, 2014. The advance reading copy of Offill's second novel, a "sparse," "experimental" portrait of a marriage that made the New York Times' list of top ten books of 2014. Fine in wrappers. Uncommon in the advance issue. [#031474] $125
(Castle Rock), Bella Luna, (1992). Copyedited typeset sheets for an apparently never-produced limited edition of Offutt's first book, a collection of stories published in 1992 as a paperback original in the Vintage Contemporaries series. One full set (140 pages) and five partial sets (approximately 270 pages). With copyeditor's marks throughout. 8-1/2" x 11" sheets, printed on rectos only. A few marks where rubber bands once lay; near fine, in manuscript box. Offutt's book received high praise from critics; on the strength of it and his 1993 memoir, The Same River Twice, he was named one of the "20 best young American writers" by Granta magazine. Presumably unique. [#915763] $750
(NY), Delacorte Press, (1974). Both a review copy and an uncorrected proof copy of her first novel, begun in 1932 -- a chapter of it was published in the Partisan Review in 1934 -- and set aside for 40 years while the author raised her four daughters, engaged in political activism, and published Tell Me A Riddle, a collection of three short stories and an O'Henry Award-winning novella. The uncorrected proof copy is inscribed by the author to noted bookseller Burt Britton: "Dear Burt - I am sorry you have this - I am sorry I could not prevent this edition with its changes made by an impertinent copy editor, and a publisher who refused to print corrections to original copy, and all the changes and revisions I felt necessary after seeing these proofs. The paperback is right. Tillie." Olsen has also signed her name in full on the same page; written an illegible note ("genuine .... smear") on the front cover, which she has initialed; corrected the publication date on the information sheet on the inside front cover; and added "and an unnamed copyeditor" to the author credit. A hint of spine sunning, else fine in wrappers. Together with a review copy of the first edition, signed by Olsen on the title page, and inscribed by her under the front flap: "For Burt Britton, Book Lover - See note in uncorrected page proof. Thank you for caring for this anyway. Tillie Olsen 1976." Fine in a very near fine, mildly spine-sunned dust jacket, with review slip laid in. Books inscribed by Olsen -- whose handwriting is so tiny as to be almost unreadable -- are uncommon. The proof and the book are housed together in a custom clamshell case. [#028867] SOLD
NY, Doubleday, (1994). The advance reading copy of his second book, first novel. Winner of the 1993 Pirates Alley William Faulkner Prize for the Novel. Inscribed by the author: "For ___, this cold, cold book. Stay warm!" Fine in wrappers. [#030018] $150
NY, Knopf, 2000. The uncorrected proof copy of the American edition. Signed by the author. This is the second state, which is smaller than the first state, approximately 5-5/8" x 8-3/8" and, among other format changes, has the cover art bound in. Fine in wrappers. [#911859] $70
(NY), (Knopf), (2002). The uncorrected proof copy. Signed by Ondaatje. Fine in wrappers. [#911863] $100
NY, Knopf, 1992. An advance reading excerpt of the first American edition. Signed by the author. Fine in stapled wrappers. Slipcased together with advance excerpts from Julian Barnes' The Porcupine, Michael Doane's City of Light, and Kathryn Kramer's Rattlesnake Farmer. [#911853] $70
NY, Knopf, 1992. The uncorrected proof copy of the American edition of his Booker Prize-winning novel, the basis for an award winning film. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#911852] $125
(n.p.), (Fox Run Press), (2004). The uncorrected proof copy, which varies not in text but in design from the final version. 3-1/4" x 11-1/2". Signed by the author. Fine. [#911867] $175
NY, Knopf, 1987. The uncorrected proof copy of the first American edition of his highly praised novel set in the aftermath of World War I, the novel that immediately preceded his award-winning The English Patient, and the first of his novels to be published by Knopf in the U.S., which earned him a larger audience in this country than he had had previously. Written on the back cover, in pencil, is a 125 word review of the book by Maxine Hong Kingston, signed by Kingston. This blurb appeared on the Picador edition of In the Skin of a Lion; the Knopf edition featured a blurb of hers for Ondaatje's Running in the Family. Newspaper review laid in, causing offsetting; some spotting and sunning, a short tear at the spine base. A very good copy in wrappers. [#032902] SOLD
London, Heinemann, (1958). The uncorrected proof copy of this posthumous collection of thirteen essays, edited by George Bott. This is a working copy, with copyeditor's marks throughout. A fragile example, with several small stains to cover; still holding out at very good in wrappers. Scarce. Together with an ex-library copy of the first edition for reading or reference: a very good copy with splayed boards. Extremely uncommon to see a working copy of an Orwell proof. [#026366] $750
(NY), New American Library, (1966). The uncorrected proof copy of her first book, one of a handful of literary first novels published by NAL during the mid-60s, including John Gardner's The Resurrection and William Gass's Omensetter's Luck. Tall, comb-bound galley sheets. Laid in is a letter sent by editor David Segal to author John Barth, sending him "yet another first novel" and requesting "the pleasure of reading your opinion," as it appears Barth had made it clear that he would not be offering "a quotable quote." A noteworthy letter: Segal took over the newly founded hardcover publishing branch of New American Library, which previously had specialized in paperback publishing only -- notably the Signet and Mentor imprints, which reprinted classics and bestsellers. Segal immediately began publishing literary fiction by young, unknown writers, and in the course of a couple of years introduced William Gass, John Gardner, Michael Shaara, Alice Adams and Cynthia Ozick to the world, all of whom went on to become major American authors. It's a bit surprising that Barth would have been averse to providing a "quotable quote" for the likes of these, but apparently that was the case. This copy is signed by Barth on the first page and with his address stamp on the front cover. Ozick's name was left off the cover and has been added in ink. Mild sunning and curling to the covers; small tear at upper spine; about near fine. A very scarce proof of an important first book, and a copy with exceptionally interesting provenance. [#031477] $1,500
NY, Doubleday, (2001). The advance reading copy. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#911872] $150
London, Jonathan Cape, (1999). The uncorrected proof copy of the first British edition. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#031736] $100
(London), Orion Books, (2003). The advance reading copy of the British edition of the third of his Derek Strange and Terry Quinn books. Inscribed by Pelecanos three months prior to publication: "To ___, from one Greek-American to another, with respect." Fine in wrappers. [#023035] $70
NY, St. Martin's, (2011). The advance reading copy. Despite a stated 300,000 copy printing of the first edition, advance copies are uncommon, perhaps an indication of the new methods of book promotion being used by publishers, involving social media more than free prepublication copies of forthcoming books. A couple tiny dents to spine; still very near fine in wrappers. [#029343] $70
(NY), Delacorte Press/Seymour Lawrence, (1979). The uncorrected proof copy of her well-received first collection of stories, her first book to be published by a major, mainstream publisher. Inscribed by the author to publisher Seymour Lawrence and signed only as "the witch." Spine sunned; else fine in wrappers. A nice association copy. [#004289] $575
For notifications of our sale lists, new arrivals, new catalogs, or other e-lists, subscribe to our email list:
*:
:
:

Note: Your email will not be shared and will only be used for Lopezbooks.com announcements.

New Arrivals Catalog 168