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All books are first printings of first editions or first American editions unless otherwise noted.

NY, Holt Rinehart Winston, (1965). A review copy of Vonnegut's sixth book, one of the novels that began earning him a small but passionate following in the mid-1960s, before his breakthrough to the status of "major author," which came when Slaughterhouse-Five was published. Signed by the author with a self-caricature. Owner signature of cartoonist Claude Smith under front flap; very slight loss to spine lettering; otherwise a fine copy in a near fine dust jacket with some unnecessary tape strengthening on verso and slight dampstaining, also on verso. With press release laid in. In a custom clamshell case. [#029019] $3,500

(n.p.), [Spiffing Books], 1994. A bootleg production printing a lecture Vonnegut gave at the Roosevelt Hotel in New York City on March 15, 1994 and also including the text of the question and answer session that followed. Two dozen pages of single-spaced text, plus as many pages of illustrations, mostly drawings by Vonnegut taken from Breakfast of Champions. Roughly 15000 words by Vonnegut that don't appear elsewhere. Fine in stapled wrappers. Rare: this is the only copy we have ever seen. [#027144] $2,500

NY/(London), Seven Stories Press/Bloomsbury, (2005/2006). Both the first American edition and the first British edition of this collection of essays. The American edition is signed by the author with a self-caricature and dated 6/17/06; the British edition is signed by the author with a self-caricature and dated 7/12/06. Each is fine in a fine dust jacket and the two are housed together in a custom clamshell case. From the collection of Joe Petro III; the six page Author's Note at the end of the book is almost entirely devoted to the relationship between Vonnegut and Petro, including the comment that "it seems quite possible in retrospect that Joe Petro III saved my life." Very few copies of this title were signed by Vonnegut, especially the U.K. edition. [#029740] $2,000

Barnstable, Crane Duplicating Service, (1966). The first separate appearance of this essay, which first appeared in Venture Magazine in 1964 and was later collected under a different title in Welcome to the Monkey House in 1968. Here printed as a Christmas greeting for friends of Crane Duplicating Service, located in Barnstable, a town where Vonnegut lived while raising a family and managing a Saab dealership. Two sheets folded to make eight pages; slight upper corner crease; else fine. Rare. [#025012] $2,000

London, Jonathan Cape, (1968). The first British edition. Published six years after the American paperback and two years after the American hardcover. Signed by the author with a self-caricature. A couple spots to foredge, else fine in a near fine, mildly spine-sunned dust jacket. An uncommon edition, and extremely scarce signed. [#029020] $1,750

Hollywood, The Wanda June Co., 1971. Vonnegut's first screenplay, for the 1971 film based on his stage play, which opened off-Broadway in 1970 and then moved to Broadway for a successful, although relatively short, run. This copy is identified on the front cover as a "Rehearsal Script" and dated March 25, 1971. Signed by Vonnegut on the front cover, with the added comment: "Genuine Relic." 8-1/2" x 11" sheets, printed on rectos only. Several penciled corrections in the text; claspbound in cardstock covers; faint coffee ring on rear cover; near fine. Rare. [#009540] $1,750

London, Jonathan Cape, (1965). The first British edition of Vonnegut's sixth book, one of the novels that began earning him a small but passionate following in the mid-1960s, before his breakthrough to the status of "major author," which came when Slaughterhouse-Five was published. Signed by the author. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with mild rubbing to the rear panel and very slight edge wear. In custom clamshell case. [#027307] $1,500

(n.p.), (Self-published), 2005. Seventeen poems by Vonnegut, computer printed, ringbound, and signed by Vonnegut on the front cover in blue pen, dated 5/26/05. Vonnegut made velobound photocopies of this collection for friends, but this is apparently the original copy he made: the only other one we have seen reproduced the signature and date on the front cover, whereas this signature and date are original. The poems herein were published, individually and in pairs, in issues of the Cornell Daily Sun beginning in October, 2005. They have not been published or collected elsewhere, other than this production that Vonnegut himself did. As it is, unique, and more of a typescript than an edition: the copies made from this one would constitute the edition. Fine. [#032681] $1,500

2004. The text of Vonnegut's speech, a humanist treatise for the 21st century. Computer printout, 12 pages. Signed by the author. Fine, in hand-addressed mailing envelope, postmarked within a month of the speech. [#029371] $1,500

2003. The text of Vonnegut's speech, given at the Mark Twain House, in which he speaks well of Twain and Lincoln and American saints and less well of American Conservatives. Computer printout, 14 pages. Signed by Vonnegut and dated April 23, 2003 -- a week before he gave the speech. A version of this speech was published in In These Times in June, 2003 and by Spokeman Books in 2004. Fine. [#029369] $1,500

London, Cape, (1973). The first British edition of a play that opened off-Broadway in 1970 and later made it to Broadway for a successful, although relatively short, run. With an introduction by Vonnegut explaining the genesis and personal relevance of the play. Without the photographs of the U.S. edition. Signed by the author on the first blank. Fine in a very near fine, price-clipped dust jacket with trace wear to the crown. In a custom clamshell case. [#029022] $850

London, Cape, (1973). The first British edition of this play that opened off-Broadway in 1970 and later made it to Broadway for a successful, although relatively short, run. With an introduction by Vonnegut explaining the genesis and personal relevance of the play. Signed by the author with a self-caricature. The British edition lacks the photographs of the U.S. edition. Small bookstore stamp front pastedown; fine in a fine dust jacket. In a custom clamshell case. A beautiful copy, and very uncommon signed. [#029196] $850

Budapest, Magyar Konyvklub, (1998). The first Hungarian edition of Vonnegut's final novel. Signed by Vonnegut in the year of publication and further illustrated with a smoking self-caricature on the title page, facing Vonnegut's portrait of Kilgore Trout, which serves as a frontispiece illustration for this edition. The text contains (in the context of the death of John Dillinger) the quote often misattributed to Vonnegut, "If you have a Hungarian for a friend, you don't need an enemy." Fine in pictorial boards, without dust jacket, as issued. In custom slipcase. Probably the only signed Hungarian edition of this title to come on the market, ever, and although Vonnegut was liberal with his self-caricatures, ones that picture him smoking are scarce. [#021782] $750

(n.p.), (Self-published), 2005. Seventeen poems, photocopied and velobound. Self-published by Vonnegut and given to friends. With his photocopied signature and the date, 5/26/05. Fine. These poems were published, individually and in pairs, in issues of the Cornell Daily Sun beginning in October, 2005. They have not been published or collected elsewhere, other than this production Vonnegut himself did. Scarce. [#029027] $750

(Ann Arbor), State Street Press, (2007). The advance reading copy of an unpublished book about Vonnegut, with illustrations by Vonnegut and an original frontispiece by Ralph Steadman. Together with a photocopy of Brinkley's original typescript, with textual differences from the printed version. In 2006, Brinkley published a profile of Vonnegut in Rolling Stone; in 2007, after Vonnegut's death, Borders (State Street Press) asked Brinkley if he had a longer, un-edited version of the article that could be used as a tribute book. The 53-page typescript included here, entitled Choking the Broomhandle, became the 93-page advance reading copy of the book Apocalypse Blues before the project was ended, for reasons unknown to us. The typescript has some editorial changes in an unknown hand and is near fine; the advance reading copy is fine in wrappers. [#029545] $750

(NY), Delacorte Press, (1973). The uncorrected proof copy of this novel that was Vonnegut's fiftieth birthday present to himself and his characters: in the book Vonnegut grants many of his previous characters their freedom (most notably Kilgore Trout who, unable to make it on the outside, returns in later books). Tall sheets, bound in green wrappers. A few strips of sunning and a corner crease on the rear cover. Near fine. [#031536] $600

(East Hampton), (Glenn Horowitz), (1999). Vonnegut provides the introduction to this booklet showcasing the paintings of April Gornik and published to coincide with an exhibit of her work. This is the limited edition. One of 100 numbered copies. Signed by Vonnegut and Gornik. Clothbound; fine in a fine slipcase. An attractive production, with 12 color plates tipped in. [#014689] $500

(n.p.), (Impress), (2012). A collection of more than thirty of the 145 drawings Vonnegut completed in the 1980s. Inscribed by the publisher, Hans Teensma, to Peter [Matthiessen]: "Since meeting Kurt at your house, this is a special gift to you." Also signed by Teensma in the rear of the book. Tall, thin quarto: 9-1/2" x 12-1/2". Splaying to covers, else fine. Scarce, virtually unknown publication; a different volume with the same title was published in 2014. [#032331] $400

(Albany), State University of New York, (2001). New essays on Vonnegut, with a foreword by Vonnegut. Includes pieces by Jerome Klinkowitz, Loree Rackstraw, David Pringle and others. Signed by Vonnegut with a self-caricature. Fine in wrappers. [#029030] $350

(Sixties)
Vancouver, Poppin Publications, 1970. A small press production in which Bijou's black-and-white photographs are accompanied by text from Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle, for an upbeat late 60's/early 70's feel. A bit of sunning, small chip threatening at base of spine; near fine in wrappers. By all appearances, quite scarce. [#028356] $175

Woodstock, Dramatic Publishing, (1993). A play based on a Vonnegut story that first appeared in Saturday Evening Post and later in Welcome to the Monkey House. Fine in stapled wrappers. We haven't found that this play has ever been produced. [#030147] $150

Woodstock, Dramatic Publishing, (1993). A play based on a Vonnegut story that first appeared in Saturday Evening Post and later in Welcome to the Monkey House. We haven't found that this play has ever been produced. Near fine in stapled wrappers. [#030871] $125

NY, Putnam, (1997). The advance reading copy of this novel in which Vonnegut and his fictional alter-ego, Kilgore Trout, each touch on stories they would have liked to have told and, in doing so, tell another, about the whole in life being the sum of the parts one attends to. Fine in wrappers. [#007237] $75

London, Jonathan Cape, (1997). The advance reading copy of the first British edition. Fine in wrappers. [#011047] $75

(NY), Delacorte Press, (1985). The uncorrected proof copy. Faint pink spot to cover; else fine in wrappers. [#020544] $65

Staten Island, Karass, 1994. A 'zine that takes its title, Karass, from Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle (a karass being a group of people doing God's will without ever discovering what they are doing). The back cover of this issue reproduces a letter from Vonnegut to editor Jeremy Jusak that says "I am tickled pink that there is now, thanks to you, a humane and lively publication named Karass." The original letter was signed with a smoking self-caricature and with an annotation, referring to the cigarette, "very bad." Fine in stapled wrappers, with an insert offering other issues for sale. [#029029] $65

NY, Seven Stories Press, (1998). The advance reading copy of this memoir of life on the street, for which Vonnegut provides a foreword. Fine in wrappers. Uncommon. [#012489] $50

(East Hampton), (Glenn Horowitz), (1999). Vonnegut provides the introduction to this booklet showcasing the paintings of April Gornik and published to coincide with an exhibit of her work. This is the trade edition. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#014949] $45

NY, Seven Stories Press, (2011). Unmarked, but from the library of Peter Matthiessen. A bit of sunning to the board edges, else fine in a fine dust jacket. [#032227] $25

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