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All books are first printings of first editions or first American editions unless otherwise noted.

London, Bloomsbury, 1999-2007. The first printings of the deluxe editions of the (at the time) full Harry Potter series. Clothbound with pictorial onlays, all edges gilt; fine without dust jackets, as issued. The Azkaban, which was the first volume published in a British deluxe edition (Philosopher's Stone and Chamber being issued in a deluxe edition retroactively) had the smallest printing, (reportedly 7000 copies) and names "Joanne Rowling" rather than "J.K. Rowling" on the copyright page. Here together with the collector's edition of The Tales of Beedle the Bard [London: Children's High Level Group, 2008]. The leatherbound Beedle is in a drawstring bag, which, with ten illustrations by Rowling, are housed together in a large box made to look like a textbook, which is contained in the publisher's sleeve. Also included is the Sotheby's catalog for the auction of one of seven copies of the manuscript of Beedle the Bard, with an introduction by Rowling. Since the time of the last deluxe edition's release, the Harry Potter franchise has expanded with the completion of the 8-film series (with an additional three-movie prequel having debuted in 2016); original Rowling content on the Pottermore website; two Wizarding World theme parks; and a two-part stage play sequel (Harry Potter and the Cursed Child), which premiered in London, the script of which was released as the eighth book in the series. [#027817] $3,500
NY, Scholastic, (2000). Advance publicity items for the transformative fourth book in the Harry Potter series: Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire was nearly twice as long as the preceding book; it was the first to be released on the same date in the U.K. and the U.S.; the first to have a Saturday release date so as not to conflict with the school day; the first to have a multi-million copy U.S. print run; and it was the first book in the series to not have an uncorrected proof or advance reading copy issued. Its title was intended to be kept a secret until publication day (July 8, 2000); a feat that was made somewhat easier as Rowling herself wavered on the title until at least March or April. The working title was simply "HP IV," and included here is a promotional green baseball cap with HP IV embroidered in gold on the front and the publication date (07-08-00) on the back: note the use of one Gryffindor color (gold) and one Slytherin color (green). Rowling's first intended title for the book did leak out, and also included here is a printed easel display card encouraging readers to pre-order their copies of Harry Potter and the Doomspell Tournament. Reportedly there followed a period during which the title was to be Harry Potter and the Triwizard Tournament. The finished product, a first printing (with full number line) of the U.S. edition of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is included; it is fine in a fine dust jacket. The HP IV baseball cap is adjustable, and fine. The Doomspell Tournament easel card is 9" x 12", apparently unused; it has one small nick in a lower corner near a small portrait of Buckbeak the Hippogriff, else fine. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire won the 2001 Hugo Award, the only Harry Potter novel to do so. [#033042] $500