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All books are first printings of first editions or first American editions unless otherwise noted.

(Paris), (Lecram Servant), [1935]. A small, early volume by Miller, self-published with money he earned from Tropic of Cancer, according to the bibliography. Shifreen & Jackson A10a. "By Henry Miller" penned on the first blank by the author, also according to the bibliographers. Shifreen & Jackson's comment on the first and second editions: "Miller's name is signed in The First Edition but printed in [the] Second." There is no printed author name in this volume. Roughly 15 pages of text by Miller, intent on soliciting 25 francs a week to send Alfred Perles to Ibiza to finish a novel. Slight surface soiling; very near fine in stapled wrappers. Approximately 3-3/4" x 5". Because of its size and fragility, one of Miller's scarcest "A" items. [#017150] $3,500
On Sale: $2,625
Norfolk, New Directions, (1939). Miller's first book to be published in the U.S., after the acclaim that his earlier books -- Tropic of Cancer, Tropic of Capricorn and Black Spring -- had achieved in Paris. One of 2000 copies printed, this copy is a review copy (so stamped on the front flyleaf, with a publication date). Inscribed by Miller to Roger Richards, a legendary New York bookseller whose store, Greenwich Books, was a hangout for many of the Beat writers including Gregory Corso, Herbert Huncke, Ginsberg and Burroughs, and even Carl Solomon. Richards also published one of the last things Miller wrote, a 1978 chapbook called Love Between the Sexes, issued in an edition of 276 copies. This was one of the early books published by New Directions, which had been founded in 1936. Darkening to endpages and spine cloth, a very good copy of the first issue in a very good, first issue dust jacket with several small edge chips and two small contemporary reviews taped to the front flap. Very uncommon as an advance copy, and an excellent association copy. [#032894] $1,500
NY, Viking, 1946. The first American edition of this novel by Giono, a writer whom Miller had come to admire while in France and whom he had long worked to get published in the U.S. Inscribed by Miller to his muse and former wife, June: "For June/ from/ Henry, Lepska & Val/ Xmas 1947." Lepska was Janina Martha Lepska Miller, Henry's third wife, and Val was their two year-old daughter. Henry and June had not been in regular touch for several years at this point, but she had recently contacted him and was destitute. He arranged for a friend to send her some money (he was still broke in the U.S.; his books had sold well in France and he had a substantial amount of money there but no way, under postwar regulations, to get it out of the country). His renewed contact with June, however, sparked his getting back to work on the Rosy Crucifixion, which he saw as his masterpiece-to-be, but which had been languishing. The part he was about to embark on -- dealing with his time with June and Jean Kronski -- was full of painful memories that Miller would have to relive in order to write it. The contact with June -- with whom he maintained contact thereafter -- allowed him to revisit that time and those experiences, and to finally bring to fruition the long-contemplated work. The cloth is heavily and unevenly faded; corners bumped; a very good copy, lacking the dust jacket. An excellent association copy, representing numerous strands of Miller's life over the prior two decades. [#012914] $1,500
Alhambra, Museum Reproductions, (n.d.). Eight unused postcards, each reproducing a Miller watercolor from the 40s or 50s, and each signed by Miller on the verso. The paintings included are: "Val's Birthday Gift," "Deux Jeunes Filles," "Marine Fantasy," "Banjo Self-Portrait," "A Bridge Somewhere," "Girl with Bird," "The Ancestor," and "The Hat and the Man." Previously framed, the frames darkened the back of the cards, but the signatures were protected. The lot is near fine. [#027431] $1,200
Paris, France-Edition, (1924). Inscribed by Miller to Emil Schnelluck, one of his oldest friends and one of only a handful who stayed close to Miller through the enormous changes in his life after he met June Mansfield and left his previous existence behind in almost every respect. Schnelluck had been to Europe long before Miller had, and he used to recount to Miller his memories of his visits there, which Miller eagerly soaked up. Now Miller, in Paris for the second time in October, 1930, relays this book to his friend, with a recommendation that it is "fairly easy to read and quite entertaining. Try it!" He also recounts seeing "a peach of a Huysmans yesterday on Blvd Raspail called 'Croquis de Paris.' So much to buy -- so much -- if one only had the dough!" A wonderful inscription to one of his best friends, focused on Paris and books, not to mention poverty -- the important early themes of Miller's literary life. Wrappers are missing and the inscription is on the half-title which is the first page here. Page detached from the rest of the text; extremely brittle, acidifying pages. The condition is fair, and with a risk of deterioration. Miller's underlinings and comments in the text. An excellent personal association. [#012912] $1,000
(Pittsburgh), University of Pittsburgh Press, (1961). A critical work on the meaning of exile to Miller and its effect on him. Inscribed by Baxter to Miller's muse and second wife, June, in the year of publication: "For June/ who deserves a book about her/ with gratitude and much affection. Annette." Laid in is an autograph letter signed by Baxter from the preceding Christmas season, thanking June for a gift, updating her on the progress of the book, and adding "Will let you know when we hear from him [Henry]." The letter is folded in half and lightly edgeworn where it overhangs the book; the book is mildly sunned and spine-creased, with a small nick at the crown and small abrasions; both items about near fine. [#012919] $750
Undated. A color photograph of Eve, Miller's fourth wife. Eve is creating an Oriental mudra with her hands, in front of a mosaic of the same design, which is surrounded by various symbols, some appearing to be Sanskrit. The photo, 4-1/4" x 4-3/4", is fine. Previously mounted into a photography studio folder behind a mat on which Eve's name is written (in Miller's hand?). These elements are present, but detached. [#012923] $350
Baton Rouge, Louisiana State University Press, (1968). A volume of correspondence between Miller and Gordon, triggered by Miller's having read in manuscript a volume of criticism by Gordon, and objecting to Gordon's interpretations of a number of elements of Miller's work. This copy is inscribed by Gordon to June: "To June, Hope you enjoy this. Best regards. Bill Gordon." Fine in a very good, rubbed and edgeworn dust jacket. [#012921] $350
(Puerto Rico), Carrefour, (1939). Letters between Michael Fraenkel and Henry Miller. This is the trade edition: one of 475 copies. A fine copy in wrappers. A beautiful copy of this book published by one of the most important avant garde presses of the 20th century, which was founded by Fraenkel and American poet Walter Lowenfels, who introduced Fraenkel to Miller. Miller, Fraenkel and Lowenfels formed what has come to be known as the "Triumvirate of Death," because so much of their writing -- and that published by Carrefour -- focused on the theme of the spiritual death of Western Man. [#017158] $300
(London), Turret Books, (1971). The limited issue of the fourth edition, first British edition. One of 100 numbered copies signed by Miller and Alfred Perles, who provides an epilogue. Fine in a fine dust jacket, with announcement of publication laid in. [#017152] $300
1959. George Dibbern was a German who, disavowing his citizenship, sailed to New Zealand during World War II as a "citizen of the world." He was put in an internment camp there nonetheless, but not before his book, Quest, was published in 1941, catching the attention of Henry Miller in 1945, who took up Dibbern as a cause, writing to him in the camp, urging people to buy the book and to send assistance to Dibbern's wife in Germany, and trying to get Quest re-published, as well as reviewing it himself in Circle magazine in 1946. This item is an offprint of a 1959 article in The New Zealand Herald that tells of Dibbern's ketch Te Rapunga capsizing in hurricane seas and being towed to shore by a Japanese ship. Stamped on one of the photos is "Henry Miller/ Big Sur, California" and "Emil White," beneath the hand-lettered (in red), "SOS." Folded to fit in a printed "The Story of George Dibbern's Quest/ From Henry Miller/ Big Sur, California" envelope, hand-addressed to Oscar Baradinsky (of Alicat Bookshop Press). Miller had the envelopes printed in 1958 for the second edition, twelve years after the first, of reprints of his Circle review of Dibbern's book [Shifreen & Jackson A54b]. Sending this mailing to Baradinsky, Miller was possibly still pushing for re-publication of Quest. Near fine. Scarce ephemeral piece. [#029687] $175
London/NY, Putnam/Dutton, 1959/1961. A review copy of the American edition, consisting of the true first (British) edition, copyedited on the title page and front flap to reflect changes to be made in the American edition, with a pencil note on the front flyleaf about the projected change in size. With review slip laid in. Correspondence about Miller between Lawrence Durrell and Alfred Perles, with interjections by Miller. Miller met both Durrell and Perles in Paris in the Thirties. Dusty top edge; fine in a very near fine dust jacket. Together with a copy of the American edition, as issued. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#027323] $150
(Paris), (Point du Jour), (1949). Poetry by the French photographer, with an introduction by Miller. One of 2061 numbered copies. Pages uncut; fine in wrappers. [#017215] $150
(Bordeaux), (Tour de Feu), (1955). A French literary magazine; this issue focuses on Miller, with writing (in French) both by him and about him. Miller's early writings, including Tropic of Cancer and Tropic of Capricorn, were published in France decades before they were permitted in the U.S., and he thus received significantly more critical attention in France than in the U.S. until the 1960s. Pages uncut; near fine in wrappers. [#017216] $100
NY, Harry Herschkowitz, 1946. Includes the four-page "Letter from Henry Miller to Stefan Schimanski." Pages acidifying; chipping to corners; extremely fragile, especially along the spine, but good in wrappers, and remarkable for having been preserved this well. [#017210] $70
(Seattle), (A. Wilbur Stevens), 1944. Miller contributes "Day in the Park," a fragment from Air-Conditioned Nightmare. "Sample Copy" stamped on rear cover and written in pencil on front cover; fine in stapled wrappers. [#017208] $70
(Milano), (All Insegna del Pesce D'oro), (1962). The first Italian edition of Obscenity and the Law of Reflection, a volume first published in 1945 at the Alicat Book Shop. One of 2000 numbered copies, with 30 pages of photographs not in the original volume. Approximately 3 3/4" x 5". Fine in wrappers, with dust jacket, and wraparound band. [#017195] $70
Buenos Aires, Santiago Rueda, (1960). The first Argentine edition of Tropic of Capricorn. A very good copy in self-wrappers, inexpertly tape-repaired at the hinges and folds. [#017180] $70
Michigan City, Fridtjof-Karla, (1959). The third edition. Fine in wrappers, laid into a fine dust jacket. With the forged signature "Your friend, Henry Miller" that the bibliographer notes has turned up on all copies examined. [#017169] $60
Waco, Motive, 1946. The second edition, printed the same month as the limited edition. Stapled wrappers, fine, laid into a spine-sunned, else fine dust wrapper. [#017168] $50
NY, Ballantine, (1973). First Ballantine printing. Preface by Miller. From the library of author Peter Matthiessen, who has marked several passages in Miller's preface. Near fine in wrappers. [#031988] $20
Santa Barbara, CA, Capra Press, 1976. Very Good in a Very Good (rubbed) DJ. Boards slightly warped. [#706755] $20
NY, Grove Press, (1983). Advance Uncorrected Proof. Very Good in wrappers. [#706757] $20
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