Search Results

showing 1-3 of 3
Sort By:

All books are first printings of first editions or first American editions unless otherwise noted.

[ca. 1978-1982]. Undated, ca. 1978-1982. 21-page typescript of a section of Hoffman's 1982 book, Square Dancing in the Ice Age, representing about 14 pages of the published book. Seven pages here are photocopied or at least on heavier paper than the onionskin typescript, but most of those, as well as most of the original onionskin pages, have numerous corrections in Hoffman's hand and in another, unknown, hand. Most of these changes were made prior to publication, and still this version has textual differences from the published version. Large paperclip marks on the first page, otherwise very near fine. A substantial manuscript from one of the key counterculture figures of the 1960s. [#032295] $1,500
On Sale: $1,125
[1976]. A 6-page ribbon-copy typescript (here untitled) of a story about his 22-year friendship with "Lucky Nellie," a mythical sea creature with parallels to the Loch Ness Monster, and their shared tales of lives as fugitives. With the name and address of the recipient typed as a header. Written by Hoffman, one of the leading activists of the 1960s counterculture, while he was living underground, having jumped bail after his conviction on drug charges. Unsigned, but beginning, "Hi, this is Abbie...." Published in Oui magazine in December 1976 as "Loch Ness Nellie Calls on Me: Two Fugitives Issue a Communique, a fable by Abbie Hoffman," and later, with textual variations, in Square Dancing in the Ice Age, a collection of his underground writings, as "In Search of Loch Ness Nellie." Stapled in the upper left hand corner, final page detached. "File: Abbie Hoffman" written in pencil in the upper margin. Near fine. Manuscript material by Hoffman is uncommon. [#032289] $1,000
Clayton, Save the River, (1982). A publication of Save the River, an organization dedicated to defending the St. Lawrence Seaway, co-founded by Hoffman while living under the alias Barry Freed to evade prosecution on cocaine charges. Hoffman had been a political activist, founding member of the Yippies (Youth International Party), and Chicago 7 defendant, prior to going "underground" and living as Freed. He did not refrain from activism under his pseudonym, and became involved in local causes such as this. An 8-page booklet of detailed, reasoned arguments, catchy slogans, and a couple of simplistic illustrations. Signed by Hoffman as "Barry Freed" on the front cover. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#033019] $450