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All books are first printings of first editions or first American editions unless otherwise noted.

ca. 1965. The first draft typescript of Dick's story "Faith of Our Fathers," published in 1967 in the collection Dangerous Visions, edited by Harlan Ellison. 39 pages, on onion skin paper, with Dick's holograph corrections throughout. Together with both the manuscript page and the carbon of page 43, representing the final page of Dick's second draft (which was longer than the first draft after emendations). Nearly 100 changes evident in Dick's hand, plus his handwritten insertion of the title after the typing. Dick would change the ending once again prior to publication. This manuscript, and the additional sheets, were given to Ray Nelson by Dick during their collaboration on The Ganymede Takeover in 1966. In 1986, Nelson gave the pages to Dick's widow, Anne Dick. That mailing envelope is included. Several years later, Anne Dick gifted the manuscript to PKD scholar Sam Umland, from whom it came to us. Anne Dick's autograph note signed to Umland is included. All items, except the mailing envelope from Nelson to Anne Dick, are fine. "Faith of Our Fathers" was nominated for the 1968 Hugo Award for Best Novelette. Since his untimely death at age 53 in 1982, Philip K. Dick has gained the reputation he sought throughout his life -- that of a writer who transcended the science fiction genre. His works are seen as social commentary as much as genre fiction, and his struggles with drugs and with altered states of consciousness -- to the point where reality itself was in question -- have been seen as metaphors for the predicament of humanity in the modern era: alienated, deceived by our leaders and our politics and our religions, and grasping for some measure of understanding in a hall of mirrors. Many of Dick's manuscripts have been institutionalized, and manuscript material by him seldom shows up on the market. [#033008] $17,500
1980. Long galley sheets for Dick's novel VALIS (Vast Active Living Intelligence System), with two typed letters signed to Alan Ryan, fellow science fiction writer and editor of the religiously-themed speculative fiction anthology Perpetual Light. Both letters are dated March 13, 1980, with one being for private reading, thanking Ryan for his review of Dick's The Golden Man and discussing VALIS; the second being for Ryan to show to others, espousing enthusiasm for his planned anthology. The VALIS galley sheets for this 1981 Bantam paperback original are dated 6-23-80: approximately 68 sheets of 25" in length, age-toned with minimal edge wear, in a custom folding chemise and slipcase. Casual inspection revealed one textual difference from the published version. Near fine; the letters are folded in thirds, else fine. Also laid in is a very good copy of the proof of the Bantam covers, which differs from the final version by virtue of the absence of the Bantam logo on the front cover. A very scarce issue of the book that would become the capstone to Dick's literary career. Long galleys such as these are seldom produced in more than a couple of copies, and very seldom turn up for books that were issued as paperback originals. It's ironic that Dick's culminating novel, which transcends science fiction's usual boundaries, would be issued as a paperback original: Dick had so many books issued as paperback originals in the 1950s and 60s, before his books came to be regularly published in hardcover, that the Science Fiction Writers of America named an award after him, the Philip K. Dick Award, for the best SF novel issued as a paperback original. Dick spent the last several years of his life striving for recognition as more than a science fiction writer, and VALIS could have been that break-out novel, had it not reverted him to his former identity as a writer of paperback originals. A rare issue of a major Dick novel, along with two very revealing letters to a fellow writer and colleague. As far as we can tell, unique. [#032867] $16,500
1978. A full-page typed letter signed from Dick to Hazel Pierce, author of the Philip K. Dick Starmont Reader's Guide (1982), in which Dick directs her how to get permission to quote from his work; agrees to meet with her; confesses the project appeals to his vanity; and divulges that a speech of his to which she apparently has access was intended for a French audience, and "When I write something for France, or am interviewed by the French, I always make startling claims which I can't back up, knowing that French scholarship does not require the empirical validation of the Anglo-Saxon world's methodology." Included is the original mailing envelope: Dick has written his phone number on the back. Pierce's reply is included, in which she sent Dick a 3-page chronology of his life for correction and an additional page of 14 questions for him to answer, in a fill-in-the-blank style. Dick's handwritten corrections and responses, approximately 30, are included. For example, he fills in the last names of his wives, some significant dates, answers that the Western writer Will Cook was an influence on his writing, and notes that his work in progress is "VALIS." This chronology was included in Pierce's guide, which was published shortly after Dick's death. The letter appeared in Dick's Selected Letters. Stray pen mark on the text of Dick's letter; mailing folds and mild age-toning; otherwise the lot is fine. A notable piece of what might be called Dick-iana. Unique. [#033009] $5,000
1975. A letter dated January 27, 1975 and written to Paul [presumably Paul Williams, Dick's close friend and eventual biographer] transmitting chapter one of Confessions [of a Crap Artist] (not included here) and, included here, two pages of "theological ramblings" related to Dick's "beginning to fashion a scientific theory about [his] theological experiences..." The letter covers a bit about the retrograde forces such as tachyons bleeding back at Earth due to the weakening field of time; one of the two pages of notes considers humans' (and Dick's) roles as avatars, with knowledge received from the Holy Spirit; the other page considers our inability to recognize God and postulates a "SF novel: Hefestus as VALIS" -- a very early mention of the acronym Dick developed for the "Vast Active Living Intelligence System" that he considered to be the nature of reality and the universe, after his psychological/religious epiphanies that he experienced in February and March of 1974. The theological writings are from the early pages of what came to be known as his Exegesis, which, by the time of his death in 1982, had reached over 8000 pages of religious and metaphysical insight and speculation. The letter, signed by Dick, runs about 225 words; the theological musings about 950 words. Near fine. [#032866] $4,500