Catalog 125, H-I

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135. HARRISON, Jim. The Woman Lit By Fireflies. Boston: Houghton Mifflin/Seymour Lawrence, 1990. A collection of three novellas. Signed by the author on the title page. Additional non-authorial gift inscription on the front flyleaf. Fine in a very near fine, price-clipped dust jacket.

136. HARRISON, Jim. Just Before Dark. Livingston: Clark City (1991). Collected nonfiction by Harrison. Harrison is most well-known for his fiction, with several of his books having been made into movies. His nonfiction has been highly praised as well, although not previously collected. This book is divided into sections with essays on food, travel and sport, and literary matters, covering a span of 25 years. Signed by the author. Fine in a near fine, mildly spine-faded dust jacket.

137. HARRISON, Jim. The Boy Who Ran to the Woods. NY: Atlantic (2000). The advance reading copy of Harrison's first book for children, a moving story illustrated by Tom Pohrt, who did the pictures for Barry Lopez's Crow and Weasel, among other works. Signed by Harrison and Pohrt. Small quarto, fine in stapled wrappers.

138. (HARRISON, Jim). Who's Writing This? (Hopewell): Ecco Press (1995). A collection of original prose self-portraits, accompanied by self-caricatures, by Harrison, Updike, Bowles, Butler, Fowles, Leonard, Michener, Oates, Salter, Smiley and many others. Signed by Harrison at his contribution, "Squaw Gulch." Also signed by Ray Blount, Jr., and Scott Turow. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

139. (HARRISON, Jim). Conversations with Jim Harrison. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi (2002). The hardcover issue of this collection of interviews with Harrison, dating from 1971 to 1999. Includes a brief chronology of the author's life and works. Signed by the author. Fine without dust jacket, as issued.

140. HELLER, Joseph. Catch-22. NY: Simon & Schuster, 1961. The advance reading copy of Heller's first book, a black comedy of World War II and military life whose title has become a part of the language, signifying a contradictory set of instructions or constraints. This book was the basis for a well-received film and one of the novels that helped define the ethos of the 1960s -- funny, irreverent, and critical of established authority and bureaucracy. One of the few books to be listed on each of the Modern Library, Radcliffe, Waterstone's and New York Public Library lists of the great books of the 20th century. Spine- and edge-sunned wrappers; still, a near fine copy.

141. HILLERMAN, Tony. The Blessing Way. NY: Harper & Row (1970). His first book, which introduced Lieutenant Joe Leaphorn of the Navajo tribal police and began a series of highly praised and award-winning novels, as notable for their attention to the details of Navajo culture as for their dual-track plotting, where both a Navajo and a Western motive might fit the crime. Despite winning an Edgar Award for his third novel, Dance Hall of the Dead, Hillerman wrote for nearly 15 years in relative obscurity before his commercial breakthrough helped to open up the mystery genre to protagonists of every ethnicity and individual or cultural idiosyncracy imaginable, giving the form a new self-consciousness that has allowed it to take on the exploration of significant social issues. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with modest spine fading and wear to top edge.

142. HILLERMAN, Tony. The Fly on the Wall. NY: Harper & Row (1971). Hillerman's second book and one of his only mysteries that is not a Navajo tale. This story is set among political reporters in a fictional state capitol; Hillerman himself had been, according to the publisher, "a longtime political reporter." Signed by the author. Fine in a very near fine dust jacket with slight rubbing at the spine extremities. A very attractive copy with virtually no fading to the spine, and quite uncommon in this condition.

143. HILLERMAN, Tony. The Great Taos Bank Robbery. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press (1973). Early nonfiction by Hillerman. This is the first issue in gray cloth and in the first issue dust jacket with a single image on the rear panel. Signed by the author. Fine in a dust jacket that is very slightly spine-faded and thus near fine. A very nice copy.

144. -. Same title. The more common issue in tan cloth and with two photographs on the rear panel of the jacket. Fine in a very near fine dust jacket with two tiny holes at the front flap fold.

145. HILLERMAN, Tony. Dance Hall of the Dead. NY: Harper & Row (1973). His second mystery featuring Navajo tribal detective Joe Leaphorn. Winner of the Edgar Award for Best Mystery Novel of the Year. Hillerman's tribal mysteries were unprecedented when he began writing them: the closest antecedent -- novels that used the mystery format to explore issues of cultural identity -- were probably the Australian Aboriginal novels of Arthur Upfield. Hillerman's success reinvigorated the detective form and opened it to a new generation of writers featuring detectives who not only plied their trades in different locations but brought to their jobs a much wider variety of qualifications than the tough-but-sensitive he-man types of earlier years. Hillerman's novels are now both critically acclaimed and bestsellers upon publication, with first printings running into the hundreds of thousands. While the size of the first printing of this title is not known, there were probably something like 5000 copies printed, many of which would have gone directly to libraries. Signed by the author. Slight top edge foxing and light upper corner bumps; near fine in a near dust jacket with a couple of faint spots to the spine.

146. HILLERMAN, Tony and REYNOLDS, Robert. Rio Grande. (Portland): (Belding) (1975). Folio, with photographs by Reynolds and text by Hillerman. Nonfiction, one of a series of "coffee table" books put out by this publisher with attractive color photographs by a noted photographer and text by a respected literary author. Signed by Hillerman. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

147. HILLERMAN, Tony. Listening Woman. NY: Harper & Row (1978). His fourth Navajo mystery, featuring tribal detective Joe Leaphorn, and preceding the point at which Hillerman's novels became bestsellers. Signed by the author. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with slight fading to the spine and front flap fold.

148. -. Another copy. Signed by the author. Fine in a near fine, price-clipped dust jacket creased on the front flap.

149. HILLERMAN, Tony. People of Darkness. NY: Harper & Row (1980). The first of Hillerman's Navajo mysteries to introduce Navajo Tribal Police detective Jim Chee. After three mysteries featuring Joe Leaphorn as the main character -- including one which won an Edgar -- Hillerman shifted gears and introduced Chee, a more complex, conflicted character. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket with a tape shadow on verso from a previous jacket protector.

150. -. Same title. The uncorrected proof copy. Signed by the author. This title marks the watershed in Hillerman's career in terms of scarcity -- the books prior to this being considerably scarcer than those that follow. As uncommon as the book is, the proof is immeasurably more so: we have not seen another copy of it since the book was new; this copy is the one pictured in the Hillerman bibliography, so presumably the bibliographer did not have access to another copy either. Reviewer name inked on front cover; near fine in wrappers.

151. HILLERMAN, Tony. The Dark Wind. NY: Harper & Row (1982). The second mystery featuring Jim Chee of the Navajo Tribal Police. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

152. -. Another copy. Signed by the author. Fine in a very near fine dust jacket with a crease on the flap.

153. HILLERMAN, Tony. The Ghostway. NY: Harper & Row (1985). The first trade edition, following the limited edition published by Dennis McMillan. Another Jim Chee novel. Interestingly, the dust jacket mis-identifies all of his earlier Navajo mysteries as Jim Chee novels, although the first several featured Joe Leaphorn as the protagonist. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

154. -. Another copy. Signed by the author. Slight top edge foxing, else fine in a very near fine dust jacket with a tiny edge tear at the heel.

155. -. Same title. The uncorrected proof copy. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers.

156. HILLERMAN, Tony. Skinwalkers. NY: Harper & Row (1986). The first of his books to unite Navajo Tribal Police officers, Lt. Joe Leaphorn and Jim Chee. Winner of an "Anthony" award at Bouchercon, the annual mystery convention, for best mystery novel of the year, and also winner of the Golden Spur Award for the Best Western Novel, given by the Western Writers of America. Signed by the author. Splaying to boards; else fine in a very near fine dust jacket with a mild degree of spine fading.

157. -. Same title. The advance reading copy. Signed by the author. Small spot to foredge; else fine in wrappers.

158. -. Same title. The uncorrected proof copy. Shot from typescript and reproducing holograph corrections. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers.

159. HILLERMAN, Tony. Indian Country. America's Sacred Land. Flagstaff: Northland Press (1987). Quarto. Text by Hillerman; color photographs by Béla Kalman. The hardcover issue of this title. Signed by Hillerman. Light corner bumping; near fine in similar dust jacket. Scarce.

160. HILLERMAN, Tony. A Thief of Time. NY: Harper & Row (1988). A mystery featuring both Navajo tribal policemen, Leaphorn and Chee, and winner of the Macavity Award for best mystery novel of the year. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

161. -. Same title, the advance reading copy, shot from typescript and reproducing holograph corrections. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers.

162. -. Same title, the limited edition. One of 250 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine in a fine slipcase.

163. HILLERMAN, Tony. Talking God. NY: Harper & Row (1989). A Chee/Leaphorn mystery, set partly in Washington, D.C., in addition to his usual Southwestern setting. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

164. -. Same title. The advance reading copy. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers.

165. -. Same title, the limited edition. One of 300 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine in a fine slipcase.

166. HILLERMAN, Tony. Coyote Waits. NY: Harper & Row (1990). A Jim Chee/Joe Leaphorn mystery. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

167. -. Same title. The uncorrected proof copy. This is the first issue, printed from typescript. Fine in wrappers.

168. -. Another copy of the first issue proof. Near fine.

169. -. Same title, the later issue, typeset proof, in darker yellow wrappers and a smaller format. Signed by the author. Spine faded, crown bumped with short tear, and rear cover wrinkled; very good in wrappers.

170. HILLERMAN, Tony. Hillerman Country. (NY): HarperCollins (1991). Text by Tony Hillerman; photographs by his brother Barney Hillerman. Small folio bound in brown cloth stamped in silver, issued without dust jacket in a gray cloth slipcase. According to our information, this was intended to be part of a signed limited edition of this book, but the edition was canceled and only a few copies were done, which were given to the author or to people within the publishing house -- i.e., this edition was never offered for sale. This copy is signed by Tony Hillerman on the half-title, and was purchased from the publisher's rep who told us the history of the edition. Fine in a fine slipcase.

171. HILLERMAN, Tony. New Mexico, Rio Grande and Other Essays. Portland: Graphic Arts Center [1992]. First thus, combining two books of photography for which Hillerman wrote the text, New Mexico and Rio Grande, with photographs by David Muench and Robert Reynolds, respectively. Also includes the first book appearances of two other essays -- "A Canyon, An Egret and a Book" and "Places for Spirits, Places for Ghosts." Signed by Hillerman. Quarto; upper front corner bumped; near fine in a slightly spine-faded, else fine dust jacket.

172. -. Same title, the advance reading copy, in a smaller format and with the text but only the layout of the photographs, not the photographs themselves. Signed by Hillerman. Fine in wrappers. Uncommon

173. HILLERMAN, Tony. Sacred Clowns. (NY): HarperCollins (1993). A mystery novel, again featuring both of Hillerman's Navajo protagonists -- Chee and Leaphorn. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

174. -. Same title, the limited edition. One of 500 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine in a fine slipcase.

175. -. Same title, the advance reading copy. Inscribed by the author. A sizable number of these were done, for promotional giveaway; they are significant not so much because of scarcity as because the text was later changed and this advance reading copy represents the only "publication" of this version of the text. Fine in wrappers.

176. -. Another copy of the advance reading copy. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers.

177. -. Same title, the uncorrected proof copy. This proof was issued after the advance reading copy in illustrated wrappers and incorporates changes to the text from that earlier edition. Thus, this is the first appearance of this version of the text, which coincides with the final published version. Fine in wrappers.

178. -. Another copy of the proof. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers.

179. -. Same title. Photocopied typescript. 305 pages, double-spaced. Given to the HarperCollins sales team and including cover memo and a two-page marketing plan, including printing numbers for the first printing of this title and sales histories for some of Hillerman's earlier books, both in hardcover and paperback. Fine.

180. HILLERMAN, Tony. Finding Moon. (NY): HarperCollins (1995). A departure from his Navajo mystery series -- an adventure novel set in Southeast Asia in the aftermath of the Vietnam war. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

181. -. Same title, the limited edition. One of 300 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine in a fine slipcase.

182. -. Same title, the uncorrected proof copy. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers.

183. -. Same title. Bound photocopied typescript, with a cover letter from Hillerman addressed "Dear Bookseller" and explaining the genesis of the novel. This copy signed in full by the author. Velobound; fine with acetate cover. This is the earliest printed version of the text that we know of, and differs dramatically from the published version. Very scarce.

184. HILLERMAN, Tony. The Fallen Man. (NY): HarperCollins (1996). Another Chee/Leaphorn mystery. This is the limited edition. One of 300 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine in a fine slipcase.

185. -. Same title. Bound photocopied typescript with color photocopy cover. Velobound, with clear acetate outer cover.

186. -. Same title, the first edition, which is fine in a fine dust jacket. Together with a copy of the proof dust jacket, which features a different background pattern (more woodgrain than bark, the image that was used on the bound manuscript above). Text absent from rear cover and flaps. Folded flat; fine. This is the only example of this dust jacket we have ever seen or heard of.

187. HILLERMAN, Tony. Typed Letter Signed. September 23, 1997. Written to Larry [Ashmead], Hillerman's editor. One page, thanking Ashmead for a box of books and recounting a story about the two of them working together on Ghostway. He adds: "I am making glacial progress on NEXT BOOK [The First Eagle] with my usual troubles fine tuning a complicated plot and trying not to repeat myself. I hope you advise younger writers not to get into series characters." Half of last sentence and postscript are handwritten. Signed in full by Hillerman. Folded in thirds for mailing; else fine. Together with two photographs of the Carson New Mexico post office, with Hillerman's holograph annotations on the verso, and a photocopy of a 1997 Daily Sentinel article about an effort to get Hillerman's A Thief of Time banned from a school library. A note (photocopied) from Hillerman to Ashmead credits Ashmead (who edited A Thief of Time) for getting Hillerman on the roster with Schindler's List. Dampstaining to the (still legible) photo captions; else all items fine.

188. HILLERMAN, Tony. The First Eagle. (NY): HarperCollins (1998). Another Chee/Leaphorn mystery. This is the limited edition. One of 250 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine in a fine slipcase.

189. HILLERMAN, Tony. Seldom Disappointed. (NY): HarperCollins (2001). The uncorrected proof copy of Hillerman's memoir. Fine in wrappers.

190. (HILLERMAN, Tony). The Spell of New Mexico. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press (1976). Essays about New Mexico, edited and introduced by Hillerman. Collects Mary Austin, D.H. Lawrence, Oliver La Farge, Conrad Richter, Carl Jung, Ernie Pyle, Lawrence Clark Powell and others. Signed by Hillerman. Fine in a near fine, faintly dampstained dust jacket.

191. (HILLERMAN, Tony). HIEB, Louis A. Tony Hillerman: A Bibliography. Tucson: Gigantic Hound, 1990. Covers the first 20 years of Hillerman's writing. One of 1000 copies signed by Hieb. Clothbound; fine without dust jacket, as issued.

192. (HILLERMAN, Tony). HIEB, Louis A. Collecting Tony Hillerman. Santa Fe: Vinegar Tom (1992). One of 75 numbered hardcover copies, of a total edition of 275. Signed by Hillerman and Hieb. A condensed and updated guide to his first editions, extending the Hieb bibliography (above) by a couple of years -- very productive years for Hillerman. Interestingly, the final entry in the book is Hillerman Country and while the trade edition is described it is stated: "Although a signed, limited edition of 200 copies was announced, it has yet to be released." Our information, as indicated with the entry above for the slipcased Hillerman Country, is that it was never released. Fine without dust jacket, as issued.

193. (HILLERMAN, Tony). The Tony Hillerman Companion. (NY): HarperCollins (1994). The uncorrected proof copy of this "comprehensive guide to his life and work," which includes essays on his writing, an interview, a guide to the Navajo Nation and Native American clans, and a concordance of the characters in his fiction. In addition, several previously uncollected pieces of Hillerman's nonfiction and fiction are included. Edited by Martin Greenberg. Fine in wrappers.

194. (HILLERMAN, Tony). The Mysterious West. (NY): HarperCollins (1994). The uncorrected proof copy of this collection edited by Hillerman. Stories by Bill Pronzini, Stuart Kaminsky, Dana Stabenow, Wendy Hornsby, and others. Signed by Hillerman. Fine in wrappers. An uncommon proof, especially signed.

195. IRVING, John. The 158-Pound Marriage. NY: Random House (1974). The uncorrected proof of the author's third book. Inscribed by the author to John Hawkes and his wife: "For Jack &/ Sophie - with/ my affection and/ admiration -/ John Irving." With Irving's name and mailing address printed in his hand beneath his signature. A wonderful literary association: Irving used a Hawkes quote from The Blood Oranges as one of the epigraphs of the book. Books signed by Irving are uncommon, and association copies of his books are rare. This proof is itself rare, dating from an era in which proofs were not routinely kept or filtered into the rare book trade, and the combination of the proof's rarity (we've only had it once before) and the rarity of Irving association copies marks this as an exceptional Irving item. Cocked and spine-faded; very good in wrappers.

196. IRVING, John. The World According to Garp. NY: Dutton (1978). The author's fourth novel and breakthrough book, which went into numerous printings, became a multi-million copy bestseller and a National Book Award winner in its paperback release. Basis for a well-received movie, albeit one that by consensus fell short of the book's magic. The first printing of Garp was 35,000 copies -- far larger than any of Irving's previous novels but far short of any of the books that came later: his next novel, The Hotel New Hampshire, had a 100,000 copy first printing and since then all his books have had printings well into six figures. This copy is inscribed by the author and is fine in a fine dust jacket. A difficult book to find in fine condition: copies seem to have been handled and read, maybe even re-read, and generally show substantial wear. Very few copies that are both fine and signed have turned up on the market in recent years.

197. -. Another copy, unsigned. Fine in fine dust jacket, and scarce thus.

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