Catalog 113, D

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106. DAVIS, Val. Track of the Scorpion. NY: St. Martin's (1996). The author's first mystery, featuring a New Mexico archaeologist as protagonist. Signed by the author. Fine in dust jacket. Laid in is a typed letter signed by the author.

107. DAY, Wesley. On to Me Now. (n.p.): (n.p.) (n.d.). Self-published poetry from the San Francisco poetry renaissance of the 1950s. Inscribed by the author to Pauline Kael, the former New Yorker film critic who got her start reviewing films on KPFA in San Francisco in the Fifties. Quarto; near fine in claspbound wrappers.

108. DELILLO, Don. White Noise. (London): Picador (1985). The first British edition of his National Book Award-winning novel. Mild acidification to pages; else fine in a fine dust jacket with a sticker removal shadow over the price on the front flap. An attractive copy of an uncommon edition.

109. DELILLO, Don. Underworld. (NY): Scribner (1997). His masterwork, and his third National Book Award nomination. Winner of the William Dean Howells Award for the best work of fiction published in the U.S. in the past five years. Signed by the author. Slight corner bump; else fine in a fine dust jacket.

110. DOCTOROW, E.L. Welcome to Hard Times. NY: Simon & Schuster, 1960. The scarce first book by the author of Ragtime, who has won every major literary award in this country and whose multi-volume fictionalized history of New York City is one of the most ambitious and successful ongoing literary achievements of our time. Signed by the author. Pages darkening with age, as usual -- according to a note from Doctorow dating from the mid-Sixties, copies of this book were already showing their age through the browning of the paper; otherwise a fine copy in a near fine dust jacket with a small edge tear at the front spine fold.

111. DOCTOROW, E.L. Big As Life. NY: Simon & Schuster (1966). His second novel, a science fiction tale of sorts, and by most accounts the scarcest of his books. Signed by the author in the year of publication. A fine copy in a near fine, mildly sunned dust jacket.

112. DOCTOROW, E.L. Ragtime. NY: Random House (1975). His fourth book, winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award, and basis for a highly successful film. A historical novel of America at the beginning of the twentieth century, peopled with such characters as Henry Ford, Emma Goldman, J.P. Morgan, Theodore Dreiser and others. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. A nice copy of Doctorow's most famous book.

113. -. Same title. The limited edition. One of 150 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine in a near fine slipcase. The smallest limitation (along with The Waterworks) of any of Doctorow's limited editions.

114. DOCTOROW, E.L. Drinks Before Dinner. NY: Random House (1979). His fifth book, first play. Signed by the author. Trace foxing to page edges; else fine in a very near fine dust jacket. Without the remainder mark commonly found on this title.

115. DOCTOROW, E.L. Loon Lake. NY: Random House (1980). The trade edition of his fifth novel, nominated for the National Book Award. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

116. -. Same title, a "special edition" of the trade edition, with a leaf tipped in designating it as such, "prepared for presentation to the friends of the author and the publisher." Signed by the author. Bound in black cloth rather than the brown cloth of the regular edition. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with some mild discoloration to the verso and rear panel.

117. -. Same title. The limited edition. One of 350 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine in a fine slipcase.

118. -. Same title, the Franklin Library edition. Franklin Center: Franklin Library, 1980. Signed by the author. Leatherbound, all edges gilt, with a ribbon marker bound in. Fine.

119. DOCTOROW, E.L. and J.C. SUARES. American Anthem. NY: Stewart, Tabori and Chang (1982). One of 1000 numbered copies of this oversize book with text ("antiphonal responses") by Doctorow to images by more than 70 photographers. Signed by the author and by Suarès. Bound in flag-motif cloth, in similar cloth slipcase. Fine.

120. DOCTOROW, E.L. World's Fair. NY: Random House (1985). Winner of the National Book Award, another in his New York City sequence, this one focusing on the World's Fair of 1939. Signed by the author. Light splaying to boards; else fine in a fine dust jacket.

121. -. Another copy. One of an unspecified number of copies signed by the author on a tipped-in leaf. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

122. -. Same title. The limited edition. One of 300 numbered copies. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine slipcase.

123. DOCTOROW, E.L. The People's Text: A Citizen Reads the Constitution. Jackson: Nouveau Press/Mississippi Civil Liberties Union, 1992. A limited edition of an essay that first appeared in The Nation in 1987. One of 200 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine, without dust jacket.

124. DOCTOROW, E.L. An Open Letter to the President. (St. Paul): (Midwest Booksellers for Social Responsibility) [1991]. The first separate appearance of this piece that first appeared in The Nation, an open letter to the President asking that he re-think Gulf War aggression. One sheet, folded to make four pages. Signed by the author. Fine. Scarce ephemeral Doctorow "A" item.

125. DOCTOROW, E.L. Jack London, Hemingway, and the Constitution. NY: Random House (1993). Selected essays from 1977-1992. Signed by the author. Mild splaying to boards; else fine in a fine dust jacket.

126. DOCTOROW, E.L. The Waterworks. NY: Random House (1994). Set in New York City in the 1870s, the novel is both a story in itself and also a portrait of New York City at a particular moment in time. Like Gore Vidal with his series of historical novels of the American political experience, Doctorow has been creating a history of New York in fiction, from Ragtime and Billy Bathgate to World's Fair and The Book of Daniel. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

127. -. Another copy. A limited issue of the trade edition sent out to booksellers. One of 220 numbered copies signed by the author on the title page. Fine in a fine dust jacket, with the publisher's promotional letter laid in.

128. -. Same title. The publisher's limited edition. One of 150 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine in a fine slipcase.

129. -. Same title, the Franklin Library edition. Franklin Center: Franklin Library, 1994. Signed by the author. Leatherbound, all edges gilt, with ribbon marker bound in. With a special introduction by Doctorow for this edition about finding 19th century New York one foggy night. Fine.

130. -. Same title, the first British edition and the true first edition. London: Macmillan (1994). Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

131. -. Same title, the first Signet paperback edition. (NY): Signet (1995). Signed by the author. Faint spine crease; else fine in wrappers.

132. DORRIS, Michael and ERDRICH, Louise. The Crown of Columbus. (NY): HarperCollins (1991). A collaborative novel written by a husband and wife team for the quincentenary of Columbus' expedition to America and, in particular, celebrating the event from a perspective that incorporates a Native American perspective: both authors claimed ancestry that was in part Native American. Signed by Erdrich and Dorris. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

133. DORRIS, Michael. Paper Trail. NY: HarperCollins (1994). A collection of essays. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

134. DORRIS, Michael. Cloud Chamber. (NY): Scribner (1997). His final novel, published just before the author's suicide. Hauntingly blurbed by the publisher with a quote from one of Dorris' characters: "The dead are never really quite gone from our family. The influence of their deeds and personalities is always pushing us and nudging us one way or the other." Signed by the author. Fine in dust jacket.

135. DUBUS, Andre. Broken Vessels. Boston: Godine (1991). His first book of nonfiction, a collection of essays. Signed by the author. Small stray pen mark on foredge; still fine in a fine dust jacket. With an introduction by writer Tobias Wolff, a longtime friend of Dubus.

136. DUBUS, Andre. Dancing After Hours. NY: Knopf, 1996. The advance reading copy of his last collection of stories. Nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers and publisher's cardstock slipcase.

137. DUBUS, Andre. Meditations from a Movable Chair. NY: Knopf, 1998. His last book, a collection of essays. Signed by the author. Fine in dust jacket.

138. DUNCAN, Robert. The Opening of the Field. NY: Grove Press (1960). Very near fine in wrappers. Not issued in hardcover.

139. DUNCAN, Robert and SPICER, Jack. An Ode and Arcadia. Berkeley: Ark Press, 1974. Fine in wrappers.

140. DYLAN, Bob. Tarantula. NY: Macmillan (1966). The uncorrected proof copy of the suppressed first edition of the only book written by Bob Dylan, arguably the most important American singer/musician of the last 50 years. Dylan was within two weeks of finishing "a few changes" to the galleys when a motorcycle accident halted his work on the book. It remained unpublished for five years, during which time a mimeographed pirated edition was issued by Wimp Press, created from a copy of the proof that had been circulated. The original edition made it only to this galley stage before being pulled. According to the preface of the published book, there were "a few sets of galleys that had gone around to different people..." The accident that delayed this book also removed Dylan from the public eye for years and it was a different world -- having been through the polarizing effects of the Vietnam war and the political upheavals of the late Sixties and early Seventies -- when Tarantula was finally published. Dylan had been eclipsed by his times and while still a legendary figure his influence was barely a shadow of what it had been in 1966 and earlier, when he galvanized both the folk music scene and the young protest movement. Tall, ringbound wrappers. Corners creased, several plastic rings cracked; still very good. A rare state of the only book written by the legendary singer at the height of his influence, when his poetry and songs were transforming both folk and rock music, and by extension popular culture. We've only seen two other copies offered for sale over the years. Together with a copy of the trade edition (Macmillan, 1971), which adds an introduction explaining the history of the publication of the book. Fine in a near fine dust jacket.

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