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All books are first printings of first editions or first American editions unless otherwise noted.

click for a larger image of item #32829, Unpublished Typescript about George Orwell and Nineteen Eighty-Four (n.p), (n.p.), [ca. 1983]. In 1983, Robert Stone, National Book Award-winning novelist, was commissioned to write a piece on George Orwell and his dystopian novel Nineteen Eighty-Four, as that calendar year approached. In the piece, Stone made an effort to reclaim Orwell from the conservative right wing, which had taken his most famous, anti-totalitarian novels -- Nineteen Eighty-Four and Animal Farm -- to be explicit condemnations of the Soviet Union and Communism, and by implication all leftist thought itself. Instead, Stone argues that Orwell's writing in Homage to Catalonia -- not to mention his fighting on the Republican side in the Spanish Civil War -- identifies Orwell as someone with both a socialist sympathy and "a certain affinity with what I believe is best about the United States," a kind of Puritanism that is characterized by "rectitude...conscience and common sense." He goes on to point out that Orwell "was the sort of radical who makes enemies on both sides of epic struggles," owing to his "originality and intelligence, [and] above all his thoroughgoing honesty, [which] always got him in trouble. A writer and man more predictable and dull, less infernally scrupulous would have had a better time of it." Stone adds that Orwell was idealistic but non-ideological -- as Stone was himself -- and deeply committed to the kind of "pragmatism that has characterized American moral thinkers from Jefferson to James to Neibuhr." He concludes that "We may never produce a greater political novel than Nineteen Eighty-Four" and that "it has done its work for us" in shaping our fears and cautions sufficiently for us to have avoided the totalitarian dystopia that was latent in the post-War years of the Cold War. The confluence of writer and subject here was, in many ways, a near-perfect one but the piece seems never to have been published; we can find no record of it; a cover letter from Stone's wife, Janice, indicates this was done for Thames Television, but whether it was produced or used remains unknown to us. One of Stone's novels includes an allusion to a critical moment in Nineteen Eighty-Four: Stone's character explains that one has "to look the gray rat in the eye" -- an allusion to the torture by rats that Winston Smith, in Nineteen Eighty-Four, is faced with, which causes him to "break" and betray himself and his loved ones. 18 pages, ribbon copy typescript, with Janice Stone's cover letter, laid into an agent's folder. Fine. An unknown Robert Stone piece, on a subject that touches close to many of the central and pervasive themes of his own writings. Unique. [#032829] $8,500
click for a larger image of item #33357, Dog Soldiers Typescript [Boston], [Houghton Mifflin], [1974]. The photocopied typescript of Stone's second novel, winner of the National Book Award and one of the best novels to link the impact of the Vietnam war on American society in the Sixties to the dark side of that era -- the official corruption and the underside of the drug experiences of a generation. Bearing the [now crossed out] working title: Skydiver Devoured By Starving Birds. The title appears in a scene in the novel; it also appears in Stone's memoir, in an account of his time working for a tabloid newspaper where the writers were given headlines made up by other writers and had to create stories around them. The one time it appeared in print was in the excerpt from Dog Soldiers that appeared in the newsprint literary magazine, Fiction, in 1973. Stone's piece was called "Starving Birds" and at the end was identified as being from "Skydiver Devoured by Starving Birds." According to a 1987 letter of provenance, this copy was generated by the publisher and sent to the Book of the Month Club for early consideration for possible book club adoption. The pages bear, at the bottom, a torn Book of the Month Club filing sticker. 318 pages, plus cover sheet. The cover sheet and the letter of provenance are each signed by Robert Stone. The quality of the paper varies: several sheets have the blue tone of a mimeo. Near fine or better, in the bottom half of a manuscript box and the folding cardstock case of the Book of the Month Club, at this point more artifactual than protective. As far as we can tell, a unique copy of this award-winning novel, the basis for the highly regarded film Who'll Stop the Rain? [#033357] $1,500
click for a larger image of item #914685, A Hall of Mirrors Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1967. A review copy of his first book, a novel of drifters in New Orleans in the early Sixties caught up in the web of a quasi-religious political machine. Winner of the William Faulkner Award for best first novel of the year as well as a Houghton Mifflin Literary Fellowship Award. Signed by the author. Tiny lower corner bump and shelf wear to lower boards; else a fine copy in a very near fine dust jacket with a touch of rubbing on the rear panel. Promotional author photo laid in, with incorrect publication date. Basis for a film, WUSA (the call letters of the right-wing radio station that figures prominently in the book), starring Paul Newman, Joanne Woodward and Anthony Perkins. [#914685] $1,000
click for a larger image of item #31505, A Hall of Mirrors Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1967. His first book, a novel of drifters in New Orleans in the early Sixties caught up in the web of a quasi-religious political machine. Winner of the William Faulkner Award for best first novel of the year as well as a Houghton Mifflin Literary Fellowship Award. Inscribed by the author. Near fine in a very good, lightly foxed dust jacket with a creased tear to the lower rear panel. Basis for the film WUSA (the call letters of the right-wing radio station that figures prominently in the book), starring Paul Newman, Joanne Woodward and Anthony Perkins. [#031505] $715
click for a larger image of item #912822, Dog Soldiers Boston, Houghton Mifflin, (1974). The uncorrected proof copy of his second novel, winner of the National Book Award and one of the best novels to link the impact of the Vietnam war on American society in the Sixties to the dark side of that era -- the official corruption and the underside of the drug experiences of a generation. This is the second issue proof, in gold-brown wrappers with a publisher's letter to booksellers reproduced on the front cover. Signed by the author. Shallow creases to three corners; near fine in wrappers. [#912822] $500
click for a larger image of item #26626, Typed Letters Signed 1979, 1986. Two typed letters signed from Stone, the first from Honolulu, the second from Providence, RI. The first grants permission for the recipient to use his name and discusses his time in Hawaii and his delay in responding ["I've been under the weight of burdens real and imaginary here that have played hell with my time."]. The second apparently accompanied a recommendation for the recipient ["If you think of anything they might want beyond this, I think you might add whatever you feel is necessary and sign my name."]. The recipient was a writer who studied with Stone in the Seventies and later became a friend. Both letters are folded for mailing; else fine, with envelopes. Also included is an autograph letter signed by Stone's wife, Janice in which she offers the recipient use of their summer home in the off-season. [#026626] $285
[various], [various], 1967-1997. Eight various editions of the author's first book, all from the author's own library. Includes a later printing of the first edition (1967, Houghton Mifflin hardcover) and seven paperbacks: five first printings (Fawcett 1968; Ballantine 1975; Houghton Mifflin 1981; Penguin 1987; Mariner 1997) and two later printings (Picador and Penguin, both 1987). All copies from the '80s and '90s are fine or near fine; the hardcover and the Ballantine are very good; the 1968 paperback ("Now the major Paramount picture WUSA") is a poor copy with Paul Newman on the cover, barely held together with a dozen pieces of tape. [#033840] $250
Boston/NY, Houghton Mifflin, 1997. Bound galley sheets; 8-1/2" x 11"; tapebound in cardstock covers. Presumably produced for in-house use only. Signed by the author. Fine. [#912808] $250
(various), (various), (1983-2009). Six books from the library of Robert Stone, author of the National Book Award winning Dog Soldiers and Damascus Gate, among others. Both of these titles had war as their backdrop (Vietnam in Dog Soldiers) or their subtext (the Arab-Israeli-Palestinian conflicts in Damascus Gate), and Stone's portrayal of war and its influence on individuals and societies is nuanced and psychological, as well as broad and deep and historical. These six war-related titles show evidence of his taking the study of war seriously, even when the particulars of a given conflict did not go into his books. The titles are: Rick Atkinson's An Army at Dawn; John Keegan's A History of Warfare; Derek Leebaert's The Fifty-Year Wound; Niall Ferguson's The War of the World; Michael and Elizabeth Norman's Tears in the Darkness; and Robert Paul Jordan's The Civil War. The Norman, the Jordan, and the Keegan are later printings; only the Norman has a dust jacket; all but the Jordan are well-read and stained. Reading copies only. [#033822] $250
(n.p.), Dim Gray Bar Press, 1993. The first separate edition of this story, which appeared in The New Yorker and later was included in the Best American Short Stories 1988. One of 100 numbered copies signed by the author. Thin quarto printed on Rives. Fine in slipcase, with erratum slip laid in. [#912824] $225
Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1967. Second printing. From the author's own library and inscribed by Stone: "To Aunt Ruth/ with every best wish/ Bob Stone." Two names written on the rear flyleaf; near fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#033825] $200
NY, Knopf, 1981. From the author's own library and inscribed by Stone: "For Al and Miriam/ with love/ Bob." His third novel, a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award and winner of the L.A. Times Award for best novel of the year. Near fine in a very good dust jacket mottled on verso. [#033826] $175
(NY), Ecco/HarperCollins, (2007). From the author's own library and inscribed by Stone: "For Eleanor with love and blessings always/ Bob S." Additionally, Stone has added, by hand, the title Outerbridge Reach to his list of previous publications. Laid in is a 2007 note from an editor at Ecco, to Stone's wife, conveying materials Stone needs to approve. Prime Green was Stone's first book of nonfiction, a memoir focusing on the late 1950s and the 1960s, when Stone was closely involved with Ken Kesey and his Merry Pranksters. Lacking a book by Kesey himself on the subject, this is the best memoir to date of that time and some of its key figures. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#033827] $175
click for a larger image of item #26623, A Hall of Mirrors Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1967. The BOMC edition of his first book, a novel of drifters in New Orleans in the early Sixties caught up in the web of a quasi-religious political machine. Winner of the William Faulkner Award for best first novel of the year as well as a Houghton Mifflin Literary Fellowship Award. Warmly inscribed by the author: "For ___/ with love and thanks until we meet again/ Bob." Laid in is the half-title page from a paperback edition, which is also inscribed: "For ___/ with love/ Bob S." Small dent upper board edge; else fine in a near fine, mildly rubbed dust jacket. [#026623] $150
[various], [various], 1981-1997. Five various editions of the author's first book, all from the author's own library. Five paperbacks: three first printings (Houghton Mifflin 1981; Penguin 1987; Mariner 1997) and two later printings (Picador and Penguin, both 1987). The Penguin edition has a rear cover crease; otherwise the lot is near fine or better. [#033841] $150
On Sale: $98
Franklin Center, Franklin Library, 1998. The Franklin Library edition of this densely plotted political and metaphysical thriller set in contemporary Jerusalem. Stone tackles the religious hatreds, political intrigues and spiritual aspirations and malaise that intersect in one of the most historically significant, and volatile, places on earth. Signed by the author. With a special introduction by Stone for this edition. Leatherbound, all edges gilt, with a silk ribbon marker bound in. Fine. [#912818] $150
click for a larger image of item #8297, Bear and His Daughter Boston/NY, Houghton Mifflin, 1997. His first collection of stories, spanning the years 1969 to 1997. Bound galley sheets; 8-1/2" x 11"; tapebound in cardstock covers. Presumably produced for in-house use only; we've never seen any indication of these having been distributed outside the publishing house. Fine. [#008297] $135
click for a larger image of item #33308, A Flag for Sunrise NY, Knopf, 1981. His third novel, a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award and winner of the L.A. Times Award for best novel of the year. Inscribed by Stone: "For Jim & Lisa, in every wind and weather/ with love/ Bob." From the library of James Tate. Three articles about Stone and one by him are laid in. Foxing to the edge of the text block, mottling to the cloth; very good in a near fine dust jacket. [#033308] $125
London, Deutsch, (1986). The true first edition, preceding the U.S. edition by one week, and printed in an edition of only 4500 copies, vs. 40,000 (announced) for the U.S. edition. From the author's own library. One of the most hard-hitting Hollywood novels since Nathanael West's The Day of the Locust. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#033832] $125
(Anthology)
Stanford, Stanford University Press, 1964. Stone's first book appearance, "Walk, Don't Run" and "Geraldine," two excerpts from his first novel, written while he was participating in Wallace Stegner's Stanford writing program. These pieces were further revised by the time A Hall of Mirrors was published three years later. Fine in a fine, price-clipped dust jacket; a very nice copy of a book that is usually found quite rubbed. Other contributors to this volume include Ed McClanahan, Hugh Nissenson and Merrill Joan Gerber, among others. [#912833] $125
NY, Fiction, (1973). An excerpt from a novel-in-progress, which turned out to be Dog Soldiers. A bibliographically significant piece, in that this is the only place where Dog Soldiers is identified by the title Skydiver Devoured by Starving Birds. Signed by Stone. Also includes John Lennon, Donald Barthelme, Jerome Charyn, and others. Tall newsprint journal. Fine. [#914689] $125
NY, Knopf, 1986. The uncorrected proof copy of the American edition. A dark Hollywood novel, with themes from Kate Chopin's The Awakening and King Lear and one of the best, and most hard-hitting, Hollywood novels since Nathanael West's The Day of the Locust. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers with promotional material stapled inside the front cover. [#912815] $100
Franklin Center, Franklin Library, 1992. The Franklin Library edition and the true first edition of Stone's first bestseller. Chosen by the New York Times as one of the dozen best books of the year, covering all categories, and nominated for both the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award. Leatherbound; page edges gilt; with an introduction by Stone about the genesis of this book, which does not appear elsewhere. Signed by the author. Fine. [#912829] $100
NY, Ticknor & Fields, 1992. The limited edition issued by the trade publisher of Stone's first bestseller. Chosen by the New York Times as one of the dozen best books of the year, covering all categories, and nominated for both the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award. One of 300 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine in a fine slipcase. [#912828] $100
(n.p.), [BOMC], 1989. A special introduction written for a BOMC reissue of West's classic novel. For reasons known only to BOMC this was not bound into the book but rather issued as a separate pamphlet, inadvertently creating an "A" item in Stone's bibliography. This copy is signed by Stone. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#912837] $100
NY, Random House, (1976). Hundreds of self-portraits by authors, translators, and other "book people" from the collection of Burt Britton. From the library of Robert Stone, who contributes a self-portrait, and inscribed to Stone from Britton. This is the simultaneous issue in wrappers. Very good. [#033821] $100
click for a larger image of item #31759, Death of the Black-Haired Girl Boston/NY, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2012. The advance reading copy of his last novel, which was published to generally excellent reviews: the main critique seemed to be that it wasn't as massive or portentous as critics had come to expect from Robert Stone. It uses the form of a police procedural -- the inquiry into a college student's accidental death -- to inquire about larger issues of faith, love and accountability, as well as madness and the ability to deceive oneself. Fine in wrappers. The advance reading copy has turned up on the market very seldom; we've only seen a couple offered for sale, where in the past there would have been dozens of such copies showing up in the aftermarket -- once again an indication that publishers are cutting back on such productions, often replacing some part of their function with digital offerings. [#031759] $95
click for a larger image of item #10984, Robert Stone. A Bibliography 1960-1992 Hadley, Numinous Press, 1992. A first bibliography of Robert Stone, describing in detail the American and British editions of his "A" items up through Outerbridge Reach, along with an extensive listing of his appearances in others' books, in periodicals, in translation, etc. Illustrated with photographs, and including a critical introduction, as well as a previously unpublished piece by Robert Stone: the transcript of an impromptu talk that Stone gave at the Library of Congress for the tenth anniversary of the PEN Faulkner Award in 1989, about his exposure at a young age to the effects of writing, experienced upon reading Coleridge's The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. Stone, who won the National Book Award for his novel Dog Soldiers, was widely considered one of the most important American novelists to emerge from the era of the Vietnam war and the Sixties counterculture, and the short list of his published novels does not give an accurate indication of his pervasive influence on contemporary American literature. By tracing the secondary appearances (the bibliography includes over 240 entries), one begins to appreciate the scope of his writing and the points at which his voice was one of those that defined our current situation and gave us the terms with which to understand it. The limited edition. One of 150 numbered copies, signed by Robert Stone. With a marbled paper dust jacket created expressly for this edition by Light of Day Bindery in Northampton, MA, and printed letterpress by Wild Carrot Press. Can be signed by Ken Lopez, if desired. [#010984] $95
Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 2003. The advance reading copy. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers, with a photo of the author laid in, which is also signed by Stone. [#912806] $70
Boston/NY, Houghton Mifflin, 1997. The uncorrected proof copy of his first collection of stories, spanning the years 1969 to 1997. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#912809] $70
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