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All books are first printings of first editions or first American editions unless otherwise noted.

click for a larger image of item #26340, The Primal Mind. Vision and Reality in Indian America NY, Harper & Row, (1981). A discourse on the characteristics and components of an Indian aesthetic and perspective, which attempts to also define the differences between the "Western" world view and that of "primitive" cultures, particularly Native American. Inscribed by the author: "For Hank [i.e., Henry Kurth]/ with much affection & loving friendship/ Jamake." A nice association copy. Recipient's name under front flap. Near fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#026340] $125
click for a larger image of item #16662, Song from the Earth. American Indian Painting Boston, New York Graphic Society, (1976). Highwater was one of the controversial figures among contemporary American Indian writers. Critics have claimed that he was not of Native American descent and that his claiming to be represented another case of exploitation of Native Americans -- in this case, Native American heritage and ethnicity itself, and the "authenticity" that comes with it -- by self-promoting whites. On the other hand, Highwater, who said he was adopted and that he did not know for certain his true parentage, wrote extensively on American Indian culture and was one of the most visible promoters of Native American interests. He won awards for his writing and his other works, including some from Native American organizations and tribes. His ethnicity may be uncertain, but he was one of the important contemporary literary voices dealing with matters of Native American culture and heritage. His writing was prolific, and his books -- on Native American painting, dance, and other subjects -- have filled voids left by other writers and have become landmarks in their fields. This title, Song From the Earth, an introduction to American Indian painting, and The Sweet Grass Lives On, a subsequent volume that introduced 50 contemporary American Indian artists, together helped launch the trend in collecting contemporary Indian art. A defining voice of our times, who helped bring many Native American issues into focus. Inscribed by the author. Near fine in a near fine, price-clipped dust jacket worn at the corners and spine extremities. [#016662] $80
NY, Folkways Records, (1978). A long-playing record. Highwater reads from Anpao. Fine in a near fine sleeve, with a "Newbery Honors Book" sticker on the front panel. [#025538] $50
NY, Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, (1985). A novel of a young Plains Indian boy coming of age at the time of the westward expansion of the white men, and of the social turmoil and collapse that followed. Inscribed by the author to Henry Kurth in 1986, "in friendship & admiration." A nice association copy. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#026342] $50
NY, Harper & Row, (1984). The first book in his Ghost Horse cycle, a novel written for young adults and chronicling three generations in the lives of a Northern Plains Indian family in the nineteenth century. Inscribed by the author to Henry Kurth, "in friendship." Fine in a very near fine dust jacket with slight wear at the crown. [#026341] $50
click for a larger image of item #26343, I Wear The Morning Star NY, Harper & Row, (1986). The third book in his Ghost Horse cycle. Inscribed by the author "with admiration & affection" in the year of publication. Fine in a very near fine dust jacket. [#026343] $40
NY, Thomas Crowell, (1978). A novel about the Stephens and Catherwood trips through southern Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, and the Yucatan peninsula in the 1830s that rediscovered the ruins of the Mayan civilization, record of which had been lost to Europeans by the 19th century, and was entirely new to Americans. Their two books--Incidents of Travel in the Yucatan and Incidents of Travel in Central America, Chiapas and the Yucatan--were popular, colorful accounts that were also archeologically important for the highly detailed drawings Catherwood did of the ruins and glyphic writings of the Mayans. Signed by the author. Owner gift inscription on half-title. One corner bumped; very near fine in fine jacket. [#003016] $25
NY, Grove Press, (1992). A novel that continues with the character of Sitko Ghost Horse from his earlier young adult sequence, but which is apparently not aimed at a young adult audience; it is rather an autobiographical novel exploring the issues of ethnicity and identity that dogged Highwater both personally and publicly for many years. Inscribed by the author to Henry Kurth "with affection" in the year of publication. Spine lean; else fine in a fine dust jacket. [#026344] $25
NY, Harper & Row, (1981). Uncorrected proof copy. A discourse on the characteristics and components of an Indian aesthetic and perspective, which attempts to also define the differences between the "Western" world view and that of "primitive" cultures, particularly Native American. Highwater's thesis is that one of the great thrusts of the contemporary era is toward a fusion of the mentality of "primal" peoples with that of Western civilization, giving rise to a new perspective that transcends them both. It is borne out, he says, in many specific ways, such as the trend toward a postmodern aesthetic that challenges old assumptions about what constitute valid experiences. Small stain on foredge of pages, otherwise a fine copy in wrappers. [#003867] $25
Philadelphia, Lippincott, (1977). Second printing of his fourth book under his Indian name, a coming-of-age story for young people told in a manner that N. Scott Momaday called "truly reflective of the oral tradition and the rich heritage of Native American storytelling." The biographical information identifies Highwater as being of Blackfeet/Cherokee heritage, and the book is illustrated by Fritz Scholder, a Luiseno Indian artist, who also provided the dust jacket illustration. Inscribed by the author: "For Hank,/ these tales of the ancient land/ Love, Jamake." The recipient was Henry Kurth, a longtime professor and the co-founder of the Dance Theater of Kathryn Karipides and Henry Kurth in 1969. Highwater, who wrote a book on Native American dance, was the director and choreographer of the San Francisco Contemporary Dancers from 1954 to 1967. Fine in a rubbed, price-clipped, very good dust jacket with the Newbery Honor Book label on the front panel. [#026339] $20
NY, New American Library, (1990). Uncorrected proof copy. An extended reflection on, and analysis of, cultural attitudes toward sexuality, and how they embody the central myths of the culture. Fine in wrappers. [#003871] $20
click for a larger image of item #16663, Song from the Earth. American Indian Painting Boston, New York Graphic Society, (1976). Highwater was one of the controversial figures among contemporary American Indian writers. Critics have claimed that he was not of Native American descent and that his claiming to be represented another case of exploitation of Native Americans -- in this case, Native American heritage and ethnicity itself, and the "authenticity" that comes with it -- by self-promoting whites. On the other hand, Highwater, who said he was adopted and that he did not know for certain his true parentage, wrote extensively on American Indian culture and was one of the most visible promoters of Native American interests. He won awards for his writing and his other works, including some from Native American organizations and tribes. His ethnicity may be uncertain, but he was one of the important contemporary literary voices dealing with matters of Native American culture and heritage. His writing was prolific, and his books -- on Native American painting, dance, and other subjects -- have filled voids left by other writers and have become landmarks in their fields. This title, Song From the Earth, an introduction to American Indian painting, and The Sweet Grass Lives On, a subsequent volume that introduced 50 contemporary American Indian artists, together helped launch the trend in collecting contemporary Indian art. A defining voice of our times, who helped bring many Native American issues into focus. Near fine in a near fine dust jacket with modest edge wear, particularly at the spine crown. [#016663] $20
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