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E-list # 181

White Male Sale

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(NY), Viking, (1989). Inscribed by the author to fellow writer Nicholas Delbanco, "among the cigar fumes, with best good thoughts." Very slight splaying to boards, else fine in a fine dust jacket. A nice association copy between two acclaimed writers and literary peers. [#029281] $150
NY, Henry Holt, (2007). Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#911297] $55
NY, Random House, (2003). Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#913749] $100
NY, Random House, (1992). The advance reading copy of his fourth book, an unlikely bestseller -- a literary novel that takes the form of a telephone conversation between two strangers, a man and a woman, about sex. Fine in wrappers and enclosed in publisher's plain brown paper wrapper. [#914737] $30
Garden City, Doubleday, 1966. Signed by the author. A bit of bubbling to pastedowns; else fine in a near fine, mildly spine-sunned, near fine dust jacket. H18 code on last page of text. [#911337] $175
click for a larger image of item #28148, Letters NY, Putnam, (1979). An elaborately constructed epistolary novel. Inscribed by the author in the month prior to publication: "For Bill and Jean, two main characters in our family alphabet. Love, Jack. 9/79." The recipients were poet Bill Sylvester and his wife Jean, who got to know Barth and became close friends with him in the 1960s when both Sylvester and Barth were teaching at SUNY Buffalo. A nice literary and personal association copy. Barth won the National Book Award in 1973, and was one of the most acclaimed American writers for two decades, representing the "postmodern" school of fiction, in contrast to the "realistic" school. Novelist John Gardner's polemic, On Moral Fiction, famously took Barth and his cohort to task for writing fiction that focused on the process more than the content, thus abandoning the moral dimension and power of Art, in Gardner's view. Near fine in a very good dust jacket with light edge wear, fading to the spine letters, and a bit of dampstaining visible on the verso of the spine. [#028148] $150
NY, Putnam, (1979). An elaborately constructed epistolary novel. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#911341] $100
Garden City, Doubleday, 1968. The limited edition of Barth's innovative fifth book, his first that was not a novel. This is a collection of "fiction for print, tape, live voice." Number 44 of 250 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine in a fine slipcase. [#911339] $175
Garden City, Doubleday, 1968. Barth's innovative fifth book, his first that was not a novel. This is a collection of "fiction for print, tape, live voice." Signed by the author. Trace foredge foxing; else fine in a very near fine dust jacket with a tiny hole at the front spine fold. [#911338] $175
click for a larger image of item #28151, The Last Voyage of Somebody the Sailor Boston, Little Brown, (1991). Postmodern fiction meets Magical Realism, in a novel that takes place both in the contemporary world and in the ancient mythical realm of Sinbad and Scheherazade. Inscribed by the author: "For Bill & Jean, old shipmates, affectionately, Jack. 2/91." Inscribed to poet Bill Sylvester and his wife; a good personal and literary association. Slight spine slant and a small spine bump; near fine in a near fine dust jacket with an edge tear at the upper rear spine fold. [#028151] $100
NY, Pantheon, (1995). A highly praised novel, set in Haiti in the eighteenth century. Nominated for the National Book Award. One of an unspecified number of copies signed by the author on a tipped-in leaf. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#914765] $30
NY, Harcourt Brace, (1993). Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#912251] $30
NY, Ticknor & Fields, 1989. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#912252] $30
NY, Pantheon, (1996). Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#912254] $30
NY, Ticknor & Fields, 1985. Bell's second novel, a semi-fantastic novel of urban decay involving spontaneous human combustion, among other things. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#914764] $80
click for a larger image of item #911160, Humboldt's Gift NY, Viking, (1975). His eighth novel, winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the title published just before he received the Nobel Prize. Also nominated for the National Book Award. One of an unspecified number of copies signed by the author on a tipped-in leaf, done for Kroch's and Brentano's First Edition Circle. Fine in a fine dust jacket -- bright, unworn and unfaded. A poorly manufactured volume, which is perfectbound and uses cheap paper, making attractive copies of this title much scarcer than one would expect. [#911160] $1,000
NY, Viking Press, (1968). Second printing of this collection of stories. Signed by the author. Fine in a near fine, spine-tanned dust jacket. [#021427] $60
(n.p.), Viking, (2000). The uncorrected proof copy, with textual variations between this and the published text. Hint of a crease to front cover; very near fine in wrappers. [#912261] $45
Greenwich, Fawcett Crest, (1965). A review copy of the first Crest paperback edition. Faint sunning to the spine lettering, and age toning to page edges; near fine in wrappers . [#914767] $30
NY, Harper & Row, (1982). The Harper & Row limited edition, which follows the Franklin Library edition. One of 500 copies signed by the author. Fine in acetate dust jacket and near fine, slightly dusty slipcase with one corner push. [#029290] $115
NY, Scribners, (1958). His first book. This novel is set in Berlin in the years immediately after World War II and features Carlo Reinhart, a German-American and an American Army medic, a character who also appears in some of Berger's later novels. Bump to crown, thus near fine in a near fine, spine-sunned dust jacket. [#912264] SOLD
NY, Scribner, (1962). His second book, again featuring Carlo Reinhart, after his discharge from the Army following World War II. Signed by the author. Faint sunning to the cloth at the spine extremities, else fine in a near fine dust jacket with light wear to the edges and folds. [#912266] $200
click for a larger image of item #4016, Reinhart's Women (NY), Delacorte/Lawrence, (1981). The fourth of his novels to feature Carl Reinhart, beginning with his first two books -- Crazy in Berlin and Reinhart in Love, written in the 1950s -- and continuing with Vital Parts, published in 1967. Inscribed by the author to his publisher Seymour Lawrence, one of the giants of American literary publishing in the second half of the twentieth century. Near fine in a very good, spine-faded and edgeworn dust jacket. [#004016] $190
NY, Richard W. Baron, (1970). A review copy of Berger's third Reinhart book. Inscribed by Berger to film director Tony Bill "with all the best." Fine in a fine dust jacket with publisher's press release laid in. Also laid in is a print out of John Leonard's review from the New York Times News Service. [#912267] $175
(Augsburg), Maro Verlag, (1997). The German language issue of the first separate appearance of a story that first appeared in the Georgia Review in 1979. Illustrated with woodcuts by Sophie Dutertre. Fine in self-wrappers, with a one sheet, four-page author/illustrator biographical supplement laid in, also illustrated by Dutertre. Uncommon. This copy is signed by Boyle. [#911383] $175
NY, Viking, (1984). A humorous novel of marijuana growing in the northern California wilds. For whatever reason, this is one of his less common titles. We suspect that Water Music did not sell as well as its publisher had hoped, and the print run for this, his second novel, was cut back considerably from his first. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#911396] $100
Boston, Little Brown, (1979). A review copy of his first book, a highly praised collection of stories. Signed by the author. Fine in a very near fine dust jacket with trace rubbing to the folds. Response card, rather than the typical review slip, laid in. [#911394] $500
(NY), Viking, (1985). His second collection of stories. Signed by the author. Slight top edge foxing; else fine in a fine dust jacket. [#911397] $60
NY, Viking, (1989). His third collection of short fiction. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#911399] $30
Detroit, Gale Research, 1975. Bookplate on half title. Musty; near fine. Includes the slipcase, which is intact but stained; good. [#030476] $60
Chapel Hill, Algonquin, 1990. The uncorrected proof of his third book, a collection of stories that became the basis for a 2001 movie with Arliss Howard and Debra Winger. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#912272] $80
NY, Harper & Row, (1989). The first paperback edition of his first book, a collection of stories. Brown, from Mississippi, was the first writer to twice win the Southern Book Award, the major literary award given out by the Southern Book Critics Circle. Signed by the author. Fine. [#912281] $80
Chapel Hill, Algonquin Books, 1991. The uncorrected proof copy of his fourth book, second novel. Faint crease near the front spine fold; still fine in wrappers. [#912290] $60
NY, Free Press, (2003). The uncorrected proof copy. Fine in wrappers. [#912298] $30
(New Orleans), (B.E. Trice), (2000). The limited edition of this Robicheaux novel. Of 176 total copies, this is number 40 of 150 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine in a fine slipcase. [#912978] $175
click for a larger image of item #33063, Cobble Stone Gardens (Cherry Valley), Cherry Valley Editions, (1976). The publisher's "silver print" or "blue proof" of this book dedicated to Burroughs' parents. Inscribed by Burroughs in 1984. Together with an undated autograph letter signed from the publisher, Pam [Plymell] offering the recipient manuscript material for the book (not here present) in exchange for money to alleviate financial difficulties. Also together with the softcover edition of the published book, which is fine in wrappers. The proof has some sunning to the rear cover and a 5-digit number written in ink on the front cover; near fine. A unique artifact of the publishing process, and an interesting letter that delineates the materials that were assembled to produce the book, and also sheds some light on the details of publication. [#033063] $1,500
click for a larger image of item #33064, Cobble Stone Gardens (Cherry Valley), Cherry Valley Editions, (1976). The hardcover issue, one of only 50 copies. Signed by the author. Covers a tad skewed, with a small dent to lower edge. Near fine, without dust jacket, as issued. [#033064] $850
click for a larger image of item #33065, Dead Fingers Talk London, John Calder/Olympia Press, (1963). The uncorrected proof copy of this drug novel, which consists of an amalgam of sections from The Naked Lunch, The Soft Machine and The Ticket that Exploded, as well as some material not reproduced elsewhere. Inscribed by Burroughs "For Richard Aaron" on the half title. Also on the half title, in another hand: "M. Farmer. Reading copy. Publication date: Oct. 31st, 1963." Published at the height of Burroughs' experimentation with the cut-up technique, this volume embodies that approach, as well as anticipating the later variation of it that we now call "sampling." A good association copy: Richard Aaron was, among other things, the person who negotiated the sale of Burroughs' literary archive to Robert Altmann of Liechtenstein. There was no U.S. edition of this title. Near fine in plain green wrappers, in a very good dust jacket, which differs from the published jacket by virtue of being trimmed to a shorter height and having had the flaps trimmed as well. [#033065] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #33069, Doctor Benway Santa Barbara, Morrow, 1979. The first publication of this variant passage from Naked Lunch, here printed as a limited edition with a new introduction by Burroughs. Of a total edition of 500, this is Copy "J" of 26 lettered copies in boards, signed by Burroughs, the designer Patrick Reagh, and K. Anders, who provides the frontispiece. Additionally, inscribed by Burroughs: "For Bob Jackson/ all the best/ from Doctor Benway/ William S. Burroughs." Fine in a near fine, spine- and edge-sunned dust jacket. [#033069] $750
click for a larger image of item #33076, Exterminator! NY, Viking, (1973). A novel. Inscribed by the author to Bob Jackson in 1984. Tiny spot to top stain, else fine in a very near fine dust jacket. Jackson is the collector who bought Burroughs' "Vaduz archive" and preserved it for several decades until it sold to the Berg Collection at the New York Public Library in 2005. [#033076] $500
click for a larger image of item #33085, Junkie London, Bruce and Watson, (1973). First hardcover edition of this title, published in an edition of 1500 copies. Variant brown cloth -- M&M describes black cloth, and olive green cloth has also been noted. Inscribed by the author to Bob Jackson in 1984. Fine in a near fine dust jacket. An uncommon edition, especially signed (and signed authentically). [#033085] $3,000
click for a larger image of item #33086, Junky (NY), Penguin Books, (1977). First thus -- "the first complete and unexpurgated edition," according to the publisher -- and with an introduction by Allen Ginsberg. This is a complimentary copy, with the publishers "compliments of the author" card laid in. Offsetting to the inside cover from the card; mild age toning to pages; near fine in wrappers. [#033086] $200
click for a larger image of item #33095, Naked Lunch (NY), Grove Press, (1959)[1962]. The first American edition of this classic novel of the Beat generation, which was not published in the U.S. until three years after its Paris publication, and until a legal challenge to its banning was successful. Such authors as Norman Mailer testified as to the literary value and accomplishment of Burroughs' work. Basis for the 1991 David Cronenberg film featuring Peter Weller, Judy Davis, Ian Holm, Julian Sands, and Roy Scheider. Inscribed by the author in 1984 for Bob Jackson. Fine in a near fine dust jacket but for creasing and a couple small chips along the top edge. A very nice copy in the original, pre-zip code, dust jacket. The first printing of the U.S. edition was only 3500 copies -- smaller even than the original Olympia Press paperback in Paris, which had a 5000-copy first printing. [#033095] $2,500
click for a larger image of item #911012, Naked Lunch (NY), Grove Press, (1959)[c. 1962]. The first American edition of this classic novel of the Beat generation, which was not published in the U.S. until three years after its Paris publication, and until a legal challenge to its banning was successful. Such authors as Norman Mailer testified as to the literary value and accomplishment of Burroughs' work. Basis for the 1991 David Cronenberg film featuring Peter Weller, Judy Davis, Ian Holm, Julian Sands, and Roy Scheider. Slightly bowed, lower rear corner bumped, near fine with the topstain bright, in a fine dust jacket with a couple of tiny nicks at heel and a tiny bit of rubbing at the rear spine fold. [#911012] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #33098, Nova Express NY, Grove, (1964). His first novel published in the U.S. after his controversial and ground-breaking Naked Lunch. Inscribed by the author to Richard Aaron, a nice association copy. Fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#033098] $500
click for a larger image of item #33100, Nova Express London, Jonathan Cape, (1966). The first British edition. Inscribed by the author, again for Richard Aaron. Slight softening to the spine ends; faint foxing to the edge of the text block; very near fine in a fine dust jacket. Uncommon signed, and a good association. [#033100] $500
click for a larger image of item #24504, The Naked Lunch Paris, Olympia, (1959). The first issue of the first edition of his second book, a high spot of Beat and postwar American literature -- one of the three key volumes of the Beat movement, along with Jack Kerouac's On the Road and Allen Ginsberg's Howl. Published only in paperback in Paris by Maurice Girodias' important and risk-taking small press, in an edition of 5000 copies, three years before it could be published in the U.S. Signed by Burroughs in 1996. Uneven sunning and a bit of creasing to the covers; rubbing to the folds. A very good copy in a supplied, near fine dust jacket with a small chip at the crown. Burroughs signed this for a bookseller in Lawrence, Kansas, where he lived during the last years of his life. [#024504] $4,500
click for a larger image of item #33096, The Naked Lunch London, John Calder, (1964). The first British edition. Inscribed twice by Burroughs, first to Richard Aaron, undated, and then to Bob Jackson in 1984. As such, a double association copy: Jackson purchased Burroughs' literary archive, the so-called "Vaduz archive," from Roberto Altmann of Liechtenstein, when Altmann's plan to use Burroughs' work as the basis for an avant garde art institute in Vaduz had fallen through; Aaron had negotiated the sale to Altmann. Presumably Jackson bought the copy already inscribed to Aaron, and then had Burroughs inscribe it again to him. Since they are the two people most involved in the sales of Burroughs' papers, and the preservation of his archive, it is a copy that resonates with literary history. The first printing of this edition was 4000 copies. Near fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#033096] $2,500
click for a larger image of item #33094, The Naked Lunch Paris, Olympia, (1965). Third printing of the original edition of his second book, one of the all-time great drug novels and a high spot of Beat and postwar American literature. Inscribed by the author to Bob Jackson in 1984. The price stamp on the rear cover has been partially removed. Rubbing to the spine and joints; near fine in wrappers without dust jacket, as issued (the second and third printings did not have the jacket). [#033094] $1,500
click for a larger image of item #32858, The Place of Dead Roads NY, Holt, Rinehart, Winston, (1983). The second volume of the trilogy that includes Cities of the Red Night and The Western Lands. This copy is inscribed by Burroughs to Peter Whitmer, "wishing every success on his Leary biography." Dated May 22, 1984, in Lawrence, Kansas. Whitmer is the author of Aquarius Revisited: Seven Who Created the Sixties Counterculture That Changed America; Burroughs and Leary were two of the seven. In his book, Whitmer recounts Burroughs grabbing this copy of The Place of Dead Roads from him during the interview and reading from page 128. Whitmer's notes on the rear pastedown and perhaps a dozen pages. Spine slanted and slight foxing to pages edges; near fine, lacking the dust jacket. [#032858] $500
click for a larger image of item #33102, The Place of Dead Roads NY, Holt, Rinehart, Winston, (1983). The second volume of the trilogy that includes Cities of the Red Night and The Western Lands. Inscribed by the author to Bob and Donna Jackson, "charter members of the Johnson family, with memories of hospitality." The dust jacket flap copy writes "The original title of this book was The Johnson Family, a turn-of-the-century expression used to designate good bums and thieves, which was later elaborated into a code of conduct." Kim Carsons, the protagonist of this book, is a Johnson, and an "agent of the Johnson code." Fine in a fine dust jacket, with just a tiny nick at the crown. One of the better inscriptions we've seen in one of Burroughs' later titles. [#033102] $550
click for a larger image of item #33109, The Soft Machine Paris, Olympia, (1961). The true first edition, published in Paris by Maurice Girodias' press five years before it came out in the U.S. This copy is inscribed by Burroughs: "For Bob Jackson/ all the best/ William Burroughs/ for Brion Gysin." Gysin designed the dust jacket. Modest foxing to pages edges and endpages; near fine in a near fine, mildly tanned dust jacket with rubbing to the folds. The first issue, with the 15 New Franc price on both the rear cover of the book and the front flap of the dust jacket. An influential book, part of the sequence that includes The Naked Lunch and The Ticket That Exploded. [#033109] $1,750
click for a larger image of item #33117, The Ticket That Exploded London, Calder and Boyars, (1968). The first British edition. Inscribed by the author to Richard Aaron, the bookseller and publisher, and a key figure in Burroughs' biography, especially with respect to the placement of Burroughs' papers. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#033117] $650
click for a larger image of item #33083, Junkie. Confessions of an Unredeemed Drug Addict NY, Ace, (1953). Burroughs' pseudonymous first book, a paperback original bound back-to-back with Maurice Helbrant's Narcotic Agent. Inscribed by Burroughs: "To Bob Jackson/ William S Burroughs/ for William Lee/ April 12, 1984." Junkie was a straightforward narrative of Burroughs' experiences with drugs; the publisher chose to release it couched in an anti-drug context, as a first person example of the horrors of drug use, and bound with a narcotic agent's memoir. Mild rubbing and creasing to the corners and joints; age toning to pages; very good in wrappers. Maynard & Miles A1. The beginning of one of the most influential literary careers of the second half of the 20th century. [#033083] $2,500
click for a larger image of item #33075, The Exterminator San Francisco, Dave Haselwood Books, 1967. Second edition, a reissue by Dave Haselwood, who designed and printed the first, Auerhahn Press, issue, in 1960. Covers and four illustrations by Gysin, and signed by Gysin, who has added a continuation of his cover design motif below his signature on the title page. Very good in wrappers. [#033075] $375
click for a larger image of item #33113, The Third Mind NY, Viking, (1978). A collaborative effort by these longtime associates and an important documentation of their technique of assembling collages of images, both visual and literary. This copy is inscribed by Burroughs in 1984: "For Bob Jackson/ all the best/ William Burroughs/ for Brion Gysin." Fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#033113] $450
click for a larger image of item #33128, Die Wilden Boys [The Wild Boys] Frankfurt, Zweitausendeins, 1980. A unique author's copy of the first German edition of The Wild Boys, bound in full leather with a snakeskin onlay, and inscribed by Burroughs to the illustrator, S. Clay Wilson. Also signed by Wilson, with a note about the binding. Embossed initials of W.S.B. on the rear cover, with samples of the materials used in the binding tipped-in at the rear endpaper. Several scratches to the leather on the rear cover, else fine, in a folding cloth chemise. [#033128] $5,000
click for a larger image of item #33129, Die Wilden Boys [The Wild Boys] and Die Stadte der Roten Nacht [Cities of the Red Night] Frankfurt, Zweitausendeins, 1980, 1982. Three copies of the German editions of these two collaborations between Burroughs and illustrator S. Clay Wilson: one copy each of The Wild Boys and Cities of the Red Night, each signed by Burroughs and Wilson, and one copy of The Wild Boys in a trial binding that was rejected by Wilson, who was displeased with the endpapers, but which is signed by Wilson, with his handwritten explanation: "Trial endpapers not to my liking. They corrected this error for the published edition. I wanted the endpapers to appear as wallpaper reflecting my 'take' on Burroughs' text "I see his face in every flower." Both copies of The Wild Boys have some rubbing to the covers; very good. Slight corner tap to Cities of the Red Night, else fine. All three in cardstock slipcases. [#033129] $1,500
NY, Knopf, 1990. A well-received novel by a highly praised writer. Warmly inscribed by the author in the month after publication: "Dear Irene [Wanner], friend of my youth, good writer, good potter, good chum - Love, Fred/ 4/90." Laid in is a typed postcard signed to Wanner, from six years prior, in which Busch congratulates her on getting into Ploughshares and offers to "write about you to Dorland, if they ask." Busch also has fine things to say about his early publisher, Godine: "I love Godine for much. They did Invisible Mending marvelously, & ditto Too Late American Boyhood Blues, due out from them in August..." The book is near fine in a near fine dust jacket; the postcard is fine. [#031347] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #33933, A Good Scent from a Strange Mountain NY, Henry Holt, (1992). The uncorrected proof copy of Butler's Pulitzer Prize-winning collection of stories, many of them dealing with the Vietnam war and its aftermath. From the library of Philip Caputo, and with several passages highlighted by him: the published book featured a blurb by Caputo on the jacket's front flap. Scarce, even without the association. Some light soiling to covers; near fine in wrappers. [#033933] SOLD
NY, Horizon, (1983). His third novel, set in New Mexico during the development of the atomic bomb. A fast-paced story and an intellectual adventure of high order. Signed by the author. Fine in a very near fine dust jacket with just a touch of rubbing at the crown. [#014398] $40
click for a larger image of item #912989, Sun Dogs NY, Horizon, (1982). His second novel, a thriller set in the northern Alaskan wilderness that is both a highly readable page-turner and a powerful novel of ideas. Signed by the author. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with the typical spine rubbing. [#912989] $45
NY, Ballantine, (1983). The first Ballantine Books edition of the first book by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of A Good Scent from a Strange Mountain. Signed by the author. Paperback: very near fine. [#912988] $30
NY, Simon & Schuster, (1989). His sixth novel, about a half-Vietnamese boy growing up in the streets of New York in the '80s. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#912993] $40
Huntington, Cahill, (1994). A limited edition and the true first edition, preceding publication of the trade edition by one day. Of a total edition of 150 copies, this is copy "E" of 26 lettered copies signed by the author. Butler's first signed limited edition. Fine in a fine slipcase. [#912995] SOLD
Huntington, Cahill, (1994). A limited edition and the true first edition, preceding publication of the trade edition by one day. Of a total edition of 150 copies, this is copy "U" of 26 lettered copies signed by the author. Butler's first signed limited edition. Fine in a fine slipcase. [#912996] $150
NY, Knopf, 1987. His fifth novel, set in a midwestern steel mill town during the Depression. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#912992] $30
click for a larger image of item #911432, Four Easy Pieces London, Belmont Press, 2002. Of a total edition of 226, this is the "special" issue, one of 100 numbered copies signed by Carey and by the illustrator, Eileen Hogan and with a signed print by Hogan laid in. Quarterbound in leather. Fine, without dust jacket, as issued. [#911432] $650
London, Belmont Press, 2002. Of a total edition of 226, this is the "standard" issue, one of 100 numbered copies signed by Carey and by the illustrator, Eileen Hogan. Fine, without dust jacket, as issued. [#911433] $500
(Sydney), Knopf, (2008). First edition (Australian). Signed by the author. Fine in a very near fine printed glassine dustwrapper with one small crease. [#914436] $100
(n.p.), Faber and Faber, (2003). The uncorrected proof copy of the first British edition of the novel by this two-time Booker Prize winner. Corners tapped; near fine in wrappers. [#022874] $30
London, Faber and Faber, (1980). First thus: the first British edition of this collection of stories, some of which appeared in the collection War Crimes, which was not published outside of his native Australia, and the others of which are from his first book, which was published in Australia with this same title in 1974. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#911418] $175
(Milsons Point), Knopf, (2006). The first Australian edition. Signed by the author. Light corner taps; else fine in a fine dust jacket. [#915973] $50
Franklin Center, Franklin Library, (1991). The limited American edition of this novel, first published in Australia. Signed by Carey, and with an special introduction by him in which he attempts to draw a clear delineation between author and character. Leatherbound, all edges gilt, with a silk ribbon marker bound in. Fine. [#911423] $70
(Queensland), University of Queensland Press, (1994). The first edition. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. This book was considered a contender for the Booker Prize and it was a minor literary scandal when it wasn't even shortlisted for the prize. [#911425] $100
NY, Knopf, 2005. The first American edition. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#911436] $30
click for a larger image of item #32754, Cathedral NY, Knopf, 1983. The uncorrected proof copy of his third collection of stories to be published by a major trade publisher, and a major literary event that confirmed Carver's preeminent place among American short story writers of the day, and signaled a full-fledged resuscitation of the short story in American literature. Signed by the author. In addition, Carver has made a change to the text in the last paragraph of the story "Careful" and initialed and dated the change on May 30, 1983. The changed text was incorporated into the published version of the story, so this was apparently a working copy of the proof. Fine in wrappers with a tinge of spine sunning. [#032754] $1,750
London, Collins Harvill, 1988. The uncorrected proof copy of a collection of seven stories for which there is no comparable U.S. edition. Five of the stories appeared in Where I'm Calling From -- copyright problems reportedly kept the publisher from reissuing the other stories included in that collection. Tiny, shiny spot to front cover; else fine in wrappers. [#912320] $175
click for a larger image of item #912325, If It Please You Northridge, Lord John Press, 1984. A short story published as a limited edition. Of a total edition of 226 copies, this is copy "R" of 26 lettered copies signed by the author. Fine without dust jacket, as issued. [#912325] $500
Concord, Ewert, 1987. The first publication of this story. One of 12 advance copies, signed by the publisher, William Ewert, but not by Carver. Fine in wrappers. [#912329] $325
NY, Vintage, (1992). The uncorrected proof copy of the American edition. A posthumous collection, edited by William Stull and with a foreword by Tess Gallagher. Fine in wrappers. [#912333] $45
click for a larger image of item #33666, The Stories of Raymond Carver (London), Picador/Pan, (1985). Inscribed by Carver to Robert Stone: "For Bob - with admiration and good wishes always. With love and in friendship -- Ray. July 22. Port Angeles!" This was the first publication in Great Britain of Carver's collected fiction, this being a volume with no U.S. equivalent, and including all three of his major collections: Will You Please Be Quiet, Please?; What We Talk About When We Talk About Love; and Cathedral. Uncommon signed, and an excellent personal and literary association copy: Stone visited Carver in Port Angeles, Washington, and the two got on well, went fishing together, and generally found a quick and easy rapport. Stone won the National Book Award for his second novel, Dog Soldiers, in 1975; Carver's first collection -- Will You Please Be Quiet, Please? -- was a National Book Award finalist in 1977, and his influence on the American short story continued until his death in 1988. Only issued in wrappers. Age-toned, foxed, and spine-creased; about very good. [#033666] $1,500
(London), Picador/Pan, (1985). The first publication in Great Britain of Carver's collected fiction, this being a volume with no U.S. equivalent, and including all three of his major collections: Will You Please Be Quiet, Please?; What We Talk About When We Talk About Love; and Cathedral. Only issued in wrappers. Slight age-toning to page edges and mild spine creasing; near fine. [#912347] $100
NY, Random House, (1986). The uncorrected proof copy of his second major collection of poems. Near fine in wrappers. [#011391] $60
NY, Atlantic Monthly, 1988. The definitive collection of his fiction, published just before he died and containing therefore the "final" versions of a number of his most important and frequently anthologized stories, as well as seven stories previously uncollected. This is the uncorrected proof copy of the trade edition, which was preceded by the Franklin Library edition. Lip print on the epigraph page; first leaf loosening; one short and unnecessarily glued edge tear to front cover. Overall, still near fine in wrappers. [#004064] $95
NY, Atlantic Monthly, 1988. The uncorrected proof copy of the trade edition, which was preceded by the Franklin Library edition. Where I'm Calling From is the definitive collection of Carver's fiction, published just before he died and containing therefore the "final" versions of many of his most important and frequently anthologized stories, as well as seven stories previously uncollected. Fine in wrappers. [#912358] $175
click for a larger image of item #31646, Where I'm Calling From Franklin Center, Franklin Library, 1988. The correct first edition of this title, preceding the trade edition. Leatherbound; page edges gilt; with a silk ribbon marker bound in. An attractive edition in the Franklin Library's "Signed First Edition" series, with an interesting introduction by Carver which does not appear anywhere else. Signed by the author. Because Carver died shortly after the publication of this collection, signed copies of this title are uncommon, other than the Franklin Library edition. Carver prepared this volume knowing that he was dying of lung cancer, and many of these stories, although they had been published previously, were revised for this edition and stand as his definitive versions of them. Fine in publisher's original shrinkwrap. [#031646] $60
Port Townsend, Graywolf, 1984. The wrappered issue of the simultaneous trade edition. A collection of Kittredge's stories edited and with an introduction by Raymond Carver. Signed by Carver. Fine. [#912365] $100
NY, Holt Rinehart Winston, (1971). The uncorrected proof copy. Signed by the author. Tall, comb-bound galley sheets. Edge-tanned, else fine. [#031230] $115
NY, Holt Rinehart Winston, (1971). Inscribed by the author: "For ___/ with affection/ (this is my favorite book)." Near fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#031229] $40
NY, Viking, (1967). A review copy. Signed by the author. Fine in a very near fine dust jacket, with review slip laid in. [#031226] $40
NY, McGraw-Hill, (1964). Signed by the author. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with only mild tanning to the spine. [#031223] $60
NY, Harper Row, (1967). Signed by the author. Fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#031225] $40
click for a larger image of item #912373, The Stories of John Cheever NY, Knopf, 1978. A review copy of this massive volume, which includes all the stories from five of his six previous collections (The Way Some People Live -- his first book, which he declined to reprint during his lifetime -- being the exception) as well as four stories that had never previously appeared in book form. Its publication was the literary event of the season, and the collection won the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award. A strip of offsetting to the front flyleaf, else fine in a tanned, near fine dust jacket. Laid in is the publisher's promotional sheet, proclaiming "A Literary Event" and a clipped review of the book. [#912373] SOLD
NY, Doubleday/Talese, (1995). An advance copy in the form of velobound photocopied sheets. Signed by the author. Fine. [#911461] $200
Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1986. The advance reading copy of his fifth book, third novel, which was made into a well-received movie. Signed by the author. Slight bump to spine; else fine in wrappers. [#911458] $200
NY, Harper & Row, (1988). The uncorrected proof copy of this novel about a boxer, which combines the toughness and sweetness, as well as the humor, that Crews was known for. This is the first issue, shot from typescript and paginated to 382. Fine in yellow wrappers. [#005066] $115
click for a larger image of item #33925, Conversation Hearts (Burton), Subterranean, 2008. The advance reading copy of these two intertwined stories, one that takes place on Earth, the other a children's story that takes place on another planet. Signed by the author. Crowley is one of our most highly regarded fantasy writers, having won the World Fantasy Award for a novel, Little, Big in 1982; a novella, "Great Work of Time," in 1990; and for Life Achievement, in 2006. Minor cover splaying; near fine in wrappers. Scarce in this advance issue, especially signed. [#033925] $175
click for a larger image of item #18870, Daemonomania Norwalk, Easton Press, (2000). The limited edition of the third book in the ambitious tetralogy that began with Aegypt, which was selected as one of David Pringle's 100 best fantasy novels of all time. Both Aegypt and the second volume of the tetralogy, Love and Sleep, were nominated for the World Fantasy Award. Issued in an edition of 1000 numbered copies, this is an out of series author's copy signed by Crowley. Leatherbound, all edges gilt, with a silk ribbon marker bound in. Fine. [#018870] $60
NY, Farrar Straus Giroux, (1999). Later printing of his fourth book, which won both the Pulitzer Prize and the PEN/Faulkner Award. Inscribed by Cunningham to Robert Stone, "with admiration," and dated 5/16/99. Fine in a fine dust jacket with the PEN/Faulkner Award label. [#033669] $100
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Catalog 171