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E-list # 162

Signed Poetry

click for a larger image of item #22831, Bits (London), (Latimer Press), (1969). Experimental prose poems by this novelist and playwright. Of a total edition of 1000 copies, of which 250 were in cloth, this is an out of series copy of the issue of 50 printed on Glastonbury antique laid paper and bound in buckram. Signed by the author. Fine without dust wrapper, as issued. [#022831] SOLD
NY, Crowell, (1969). A collection edited by Aldan, who was nominated for the 1979 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry for Between High Tides. Inscribed by Aldan in the year of publication, with a quote from the 11th century poem "Black Marigolds" and "in memory of race horses, with love." Near fine in a very good dust jacket with a pending chip at the spine base. [#027326] $125
Los Angeles, American Indian Studies Center, (1993). His third collection of poems and prose poems. Illustrations by Elizabeth Woody. Blurbs by Linda Hogan and Simon Ortiz. Only issued in wrappers, but in two slightly different sizes. This is a copy of the smaller issue. 6-7/8" x 9-7/8". Signed by the author. Light crown bump; near fine in wrappers. [#912199] $60
Los Angeles, American Indian Studies Center, (1993). His third collection of poems and prose poems. Illustrations by Elizabeth Woody. Blurbs by Linda Hogan and Simon Ortiz. Only issued in wrappers, but in two slightly different sizes. This copy measures 7" x 10". Signed by the author. Spine-tanned, else fine. [#912197] $80
Brooklyn, Hanging Loose Press, (2000). Stories, poems, and prose poems. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#912204] $70
(NY), Strawberry Press, (1981). A collection of poems published by poet Maurice Kenny's Strawberry Press, with a cover illustration by Wendy Rose. Inscribed by the author to Elaine Jahner, longtime professor of Native American literature at Dartmouth College "with much love & admiration." A nice association copy. Recipient's name to flyleaf; near fine in stapled wrappers. [#026334] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #16477, Coyote's Daylight Trip Albuquerque, La Confluencia, 1978. Paula Gunn Allen, of Laguna-Sioux-Lebanese descent, was a Professor of Native American Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, and one of the foremost scholars of Native American literature in the country. In addition, she was a poet and novelist, and has edited award-winning collections of Native American women's writing. This is her second book, a collection of poems published by a small New Mexico publisher. Inscribed by the author in 1985 to Laura Coltelli, a well-known critic of Native American literature and the author of Winged Words, a collection of interviews with Native American writers: a nice association copy. Creasing near the spine folds; near fine in wrappers. [#016477] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #25284, Coyote's Daylight Trip Albuquerque, La Confluencia, 1978. Her second book, a collection of poems published by a small New Mexico publisher. Warmly inscribed by the author to another writer. Near fine in wrappers. [#025284] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #914705, Homecoming NY, Grove, (1984). The hardcover issue of her first book, a collection of poetry, published seven years before her award-winning first novel, How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents. Inscribed by the author in January of 1985, the year following publication. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with just slight wear to the spine extremities, and a touch of unnecessary black ink added to the crown. The hardcover issue of this book is very scarce, particularly in fine condition and signed. [#914705] $850
click for a larger image of item #914607, Seven Trees (North Andover), Kat Ran Press, 1998. Autobiographical poems by the Dominican-American author of How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents and In the Time of the Butterflies, among others. With lithographs by Sara Eichner. One of 50 numbered copies of a total edition of 65 signed by the author and the artist, hardbound in handmade flax paper by David Bourbeau of the Thistle Bindery. The second publication by this press, an elaborate production that sold for nearly $1000 at publication and has been out of print for years. Eichner has since become one of the more collectible artists working today. An attractive and uncommon volume. 11-1/2" x 16-1/4". Fine, in the original clamshell case, with a bit of dust soiling, with publisher's prospectus laid in. [#914607] $1,500
click for a larger image of item #25296, Stolen Daughter (Wilton), Interset Press, (1996). A collection of poems by this Mohawk writer who was removed from her family at a young age and placed in a non-Native adoptive home. Third printing. Signed by the author. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#025296] $20
(Winlaw, B.C.), Polestar, (1990). A collection of poetry by an Anishinabe writer and activist, her first book. Inscribed by the author to Joseph Bruchac with the message "Nokomis blessing us all." Fine in wrappers. [#025297] $80
(Anthology)
(NY), Equal Time Press, 1972. Edited and inscribed by Hugh Seidman and Frances Whyatt in 1975. With contributions by Russell Banks, Carol Berge, Louise Gluck, David Ignatow, Marge Piercy, Adrienne Rich, Anne Waldman, and many others. Near fine in wrappers. [#001206] $20
(Anthology)
NY, McGraw Hill, 1972. The wrappered reissue of one of the early, important collections of poetry by Vietnam vets, published by a small press that was started by vets. Later this title was picked up by a major New York publisher and reissued. An important volume, which introduced such writers as W.D. Ehrhart, Michael Casey and Gustav Hasford, among others. Inscribed by Michael Uhl. Very good in wrappers. [#010317] $20
Louisville, Bellarmine, 1989. Inscribed by Appleman on the cover, to his neighbors Peter and Maria [Matthiessen]. Fine in wrappers. [#031793] $25
click for a larger image of item #25307, Earlier New Rochelle, Elizabeth Press, (1972). One of an unspecified number of hardcover copies, of a total edition of 400 copies. Inscribed by the author to Joseph and Carol Bruchac in 1982, a nice association copy. Slightly spine-faded else fine in publisher's cardboard slipcase, which is near fine. [#025307] $150
click for a larger image of item #25310, South Line (New Rochelle), Elizabeth Press, (1979). Of a total edition of 250 copies, this is one of 100 bound in boards, printed in Italy on Magnani rag paper. This copy is warmly inscribed by the author to Joseph Bruchac in the year of publication, "in deep admiration/ a warm sky always, brother -- ." Fine in publisher's card stock slipcase. [#025310] $200
New Rochelle, Elizabeth Press, (1965). Later printing. Poetry by a writer of Cherokee-French descent, also known as Gogisgi. His first book. Inscribed by the author to Joe and Carol Bruchac in 1982, "your warmness keeps me." Small spot to front edge of front panel; else fine in stapled wrappers. An excellent association copy. [#025306] $200
Woodstock, Overlook Press, (1988). A selection of Auster's poetry, from his small press publications of the 1970s. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#911275] $100
click for a larger image of item #911002, Fragments from Cold (Brewster), Parenthese, (1977). The limited edition of this title, which had a total printing of 750 copies; this is number 6 of only 20 numbered copies signed by the author and the illustrator. Fine in stapled wrappers and dust jacket. One of the smallest limitations of an Auster work, and extremely scarce these days. [#911002] $1,500
click for a larger image of item #911269, Fragments from Cold (Brewster), Parenthese, (1977). One of 750 copies of this early collection of poems, this copy inscribed by the author: "For ___ & ___ - Love, Paul." Very shallow upper corner crease; still fine in stapled wrappers and dust jacket. Illustrated by Norman Bluhm. [#911269] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #911001, Wall Writing (Berkeley), The Figures, (1976). The lettered limited edition of the second book, a collection of poetry, by the author of The New York Trilogy, among many other novels, poetry collections, essays, and screenplays. Published in an edition of 526 copies, this is Copy "R" of 26 lettered copies signed by the author. Drenttel A2. Uncommon. Fine in wrappers. [#911001] $1,250
click for a larger image of item #911305, Snow Hanover, Granite, (1974). His second book, a poetry collection. Signed by the author. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#911305] $225
(NY), (Quest), (1969). Poetry Pamphlet Number Two. Edited and signed by Banks. With poetry by Banks, William Matthews, Peter Wild, Charles Simic, Robert Morgan and Doug Collins. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#911303] $175
click for a larger image of item #911304, Waiting to Freeze Northwood Narrows, Lillabulero Press, 1969. His first solo-authored book, a poetry collection issued as Lillabulero Poetry Pamphlet Number 7. Signed by the author. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#911304] $500
click for a larger image of item #911346, Chameleon NY, Rivers Press, 1970. His first book, a collection of poetry only issued in wrappers, in an edition of 500 copies with illustrations by Mary Miner. Precedes his second book by four years and his first book of fiction by well over a decade. Signed by the author. Fine. [#911346] $500
(Latham), Paris Review Editions, (1989). An uncommon book of poetry by a writer who is, these days, more well known for his fiction, including First Light and Through the Safety Net. Baxter's first two books, in the early 1970s, were poetry and this was his third collection of verse. Signed by the author in 1994 with the added sentiment: "Even a scowl is a kind of style." Fine in wrappers. [#911350] $175
click for a larger image of item #911007, The South Dakota Guidebook (NY), New Rivers Press, 1974. The scarce hardcover issue of his second book, a collection of poetry. The total edition was 600 copies, of which only 200 were issued in cloth; 400 were issued in wrappers. Well-known these days as a writer of fiction and of essays on fiction, Baxter didn't publish his first novel until 1987, seventeen years after his first book (Chameleon) and thirteen years after this title. Inscribed by the author in 1982. Fine in a slightly rubbed, else fine dust jacket. [#911007] $1,000
(NY), MR Press, 1962. Poetry with a political edge by this activist poet, written during the volatile era of the Civil Rights Movement and the Vietnam War. Inscribed by Beecher to Will Inman, another poet known for his political and social activism: "For Will Inman/ a poet whose work I like./ John Beecher/ May 22, 1967." Owner name and phone on front flyleaf with inscription on half title; wear to cloth at corners; a near fine copy in a very good dust jacket with a couple small edge chips. A nice literary association copy. [#029630] $80
click for a larger image of item #25335, Skyldpod, Bear en Wolf [Turtle, Bear and Wolf] De Tille, Ljouwert, (n.d.). Probable first Dutch edition. An early collection of poetry by this Mohawk writer, with a preface by Gary Snyder. Inscribed to Joseph Bruchac by the translator Jelle Kaspersma in 1984. Fine in wrappers. [#025335] $50
(Mohawk Nation), Akwesasne Notes, 1976. An early collection of poetry by this Mohawk writer, with a preface by Gary Snyder. Inscribed by the author to Joe Bruchac in 1977, a nice association copy. Fine in wrappers. [#025334] $125
(Poetry)
click for a larger image of item #18709, Poets and Poetry (n.p.), (n.p.), [c.1969-1971]. A small collection (10 items; 7 authors) of signed fair copy poetry and typed and autograph notes signed, solicited by a collector in the early 1970s, as follows: Philip Booth, a fair copy of "Was a Man" with an autograph note signed at the bottom of the page; Marc Connell, a typed note signed transmitting two autographs (not present); Richard Eberhart, a typed note signed soliciting information and assurances from the recipient before agreeing to sign a poem; Barbara Howes, signed fair copies of "Troy Weight Taken" and "A Night Picture of Pownal" and a signed Christmas greeting entitled "Talking to Animals;" David Ignatow, a signed fair copy of "Get the Gasworks," which Ignatow has re-titled by hand "Simultaneously;" Josephine Jacobsen, a signed fair copy of "Country Bath;" William Stafford, an autograph note signed agreeing to be part of the collection; and, lastly, a note from Thornton Wilder's sister Isabel explaining that Thornton is not well enough to participate. Most of the items are folded for mailing; else fine. [#018709] $250
Chicago, University of Chicago Press, (2007). The issue in wrappers. Inscribed by the poet to another writer, on the dedication page, in the year of publication: "and for ___ with gratitude for your loyal friendship & for your reliably great art -- with great esteem & affection." A nice association copy. Fine. [#028394] $80
click for a larger image of item #16536, Indian Mountain and Other Poems Ithaca, Ithaca House, (1971). The second book, and first regularly published volume, by this writer of Abenaki descent, who has carved out a unique place in contemporary American Indian literature as a publisher, poet, novelist, anthologist, storyteller and chronicler of traditional stories. Warmly inscribed by the author to his grandmother: "For Grandma/ For her birthday./ July 4, 1972/ Love,/ Sonny." Joseph "Sonny" Bruchac was raised by his grandparents, and his grandmother influenced his early love of reading. Some staining to front cover and some rubbing and surface peeling there. Very good in wrappers. A nice association copy. [#016536] $375
click for a larger image of item #30130, Alaska. Thoughts and Images: Native Voices Speak (Gaithersburg), (Signature Book), (2012). Apparently a self-published anthology by Pedley (printed at Signature Book) of Native American writings on Alaska, with contributions by Fred Bigjim, Mary TallMountain, Nora Dauenhauer, Jim Schoppert, Edward Jackson Anawrok, and Glen Simpson. Quarto, featuring color photographs of Alaska by Pedley and commentary by him on the individual poets and their writings, and an introduction by Bruchac. This copy is signed by Pedley on the title page and inscribed by Pedley to Bruchac on the front flyleaf: "Joseph -- Many thanks for giving the book such a distinguished beginning! Bob/ 4-18-12." Fine in a fine dust jacket but for a corner crease to the front flap. A beautiful and little-known production: we could find no copies listed online or offered for sale anywhere, and suspect the book was privately printed and received little or no distribution. [#030130] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #30102, Denver Verse 1970. A privately distributed assemblage of the poet's verse from 1967-1970. Brutus, an exiled South African poet-activist, who had spent time in the cell next to Nelson Mandela on Robben Island and was partly responsible for South Africa being banned from the 1964 Olympics -- a sanction that helped create the strategy that eventually defeated apartheid -- was a visiting lecturer in the English Department at the University of Denver in 1970, and he circulated these 25 poems as "something personal to give to the people who have been so kind to me here...But also there is an immediacy about some of my verse...I feel strongly just now that to justify my continuing to write verse, it needs to be doing something." [As quoted in a cover letter to this collection provided by Karen C. Chapman, editor, the previous year, of Dennis Brutus: Letters to Martha and Other Poems from a South African Prison]. In other words, these poems represent Brutus' attempt, even while in exile, to keep his poetry relevant, and to continue in his role as an activist and agitator. Inscribed by Brutus: "Bob & Elizabeth Richardson. In appreciation, sincerely, Dennis Brutus, March, 1970." Also dated and initialed by Brutus, "5.14 DB." Loose sheets, with the endsheets being stationery with the watermark of the University of Denver. Chapman's cover sheet also provides a biographical sketch of Brutus. Faint sunning to the pages; else fine, and in the original clear acetate folder. We can find no evidence of any other copy of this collection surviving; a virtually unique collection of typescript poetry by a major figure in both world poetry and, in particular, the anti-apartheid movement among South African artists. A literary footnote: Robert Richardson later married Annie Dillard, a relationship engendered by her writing him a fan letter regarding his 1986 book on Henry Thoreau. [#030102] $1,000
click for a larger image of item #33264, Fictions from the Self NY, Norton, (1988). The hardcover issue of this poetry collection. Inscribed by Burkard to James Tate. With Tate's ownership signature, and with Burkard's signature on the title page, separately. Also with a blurb by Tate on the rear cover calling Burkard "a poet of mystery and wonder" and the book "a moving testament to all that is unfathomable about our lives..." A publicity sheet from the publisher featuring the Tate blurb, and others, is laid in. Moderate foxing; near fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#033264] $75
click for a larger image of item #33141, Minutes to Go (Paris), Two Cities, (1960). Poetry and cut-ups by Burroughs, Brion Gysin, Sinclair Beiles, and Gregory Corso; Burroughs' third book, Maynard & Miles A3a, one of 1000 copies, and the first publication to use the cut-up technique. This copy is signed by Gysin. Spine faded; near fine in wrappers. [#033141] $650
click for a larger image of item #30104, La Ballade de la geôle de reading [The Ballad of Reading Gaol] (Paris), Falaize, (1952). An out-of-series copy of this bilingual edition of 3000 numbered copies of Wilde's poem, printed here with Camus' "L'Artiste en Prison," which delineates Wilde's journey from themes of ideal beauty to existential suffering. Inscribed by Camus (in French): "to Sylvestre,/ a remembrance of Iguape/ and with the friendly thoughts/ of Albert Camus." While context does not give explanation to the reference to Iguape, one of Camus' last stories, "The Growing Stone" -- the final story in Camus' last collection, Exile and the Kingdom -- is set in Iguape, Brazil. It has been said that this story is the clearest manifestation of Camus' ideals: in it, the protagonist sacrifices himself to help a friend, and behaves morally despite his own understanding of the absurdity of the world. Camus won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1957, the year Exile and the Kingdom was published, and the Prize committee cited his "clear-sighted earnestness [which] illuminates the problems of the human conscience in our times." As best we can tell, this is the first appearance in print of "L'Artiste en Prison," which was translated into English and published in Encounter magazine two years later. A very near fine copy in French wraps. Books inscribed by Camus are uncommon; the author died in 1960 in a car accident, at the age of 46. [#030104] $3,750
Port Townsend, Copper Canyon Press, (1976). The first book, a collection of poems, by this writer who is an enrolled member of the Eastern Band of the Cherokee tribe. This book won the Washington State Governor's First Book Award in 1976. Inscribed by the author to another Native American poet in 1977, "with great respect for your writing, your support of newer poets, and your inspiration as a Keeper of Tradition." Recipient's handmade bookplate on flyleaf; near fine in wrappers. [#025385] $80
Chicago, Big Table, (1971). The simultaneous wrappered edition of this book of poems written in celebration of the birth of his first child. Inscribed by the author to Australian poet and literary editor Thomas Shapcott. Near fine. [#023737] $40
click for a larger image of item #33265, Brothers, I Loved You All NY, Sheep Meadow Press, (1978). The hardcover issue of this collection of poems by the National Book Award-winning poet. Inscribed by Carruth: "To Jim [James Tate] - Good to find you - Hayden." From the library of James Tate, himself a National Book Award-winning poet as well. Mottled boards; very good in a near fine, price-clipped dust jacket. [#033265] $100
click for a larger image of item #912310, At Night the Salmon Move Santa Barbara, Capra Press, 1976. The hardcover issue of Carver's third collection of poems, and his second book to be issued by Capra. Of a total edition of 1100 copies, this is copy 43 of 100 numbered hardcover copies signed by Carver. Fine without dust jacket, as issued. Illustrated with drawings by Marcia/maris. [#912310] $750
click for a larger image of item #912350, The Window Concord, Ewert, 1985. A small broadside poem on heavy, textured card stock, measuring 8-1/2" x 5-1/2". Like My Crow a year earlier, these were printed "for private distribution" as a holiday greeting. Of a total edition of 136 copies, this is copy 32 of 36 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine. [#912350] $325
click for a larger image of item #912361, Winter Insomnia (Santa Cruz), (Kayak), (1970). Carver's first regularly published book, a collection of poems, issued in an attractive edition of 1000 copies designed and printed by George Hitchcock and illustrated with prints by Robert McChesney. Bound in yellow wrappers printed in green. (A few copies were bound in white wrappers printed in green.) Signed by the author. Fine. [#912361] $750
click for a larger image of item #914629, Winter Insomnia (Santa Cruz), (Kayak Books), (1970). The rare white issue of Carver's first regularly published book (after Near Klamath, published by the English Club of Sacramento State College). Kayak Books was a small but established publisher, which produced a literary magazine as well as issuing books of poetry. Winter Insomnia is a collection of poems, designed and printed by George Hitchcock and illustrated with prints by Robert McChesney. Issued in an attractive edition of 1000 copies, the overwhelming majority (perhaps more than 99%) were issued in yellow wrappers. William Stull's Carver checklist said that three copies were known in the white wrappers. Since that checklist was published, we have seen three more copies in white wrappers, including this one, bringing the total number of known copies to six. Without knowing exactly how many white copies there were, we can say with assurance that this issue is exceedingly scarce; we've seen dozens, if not hundreds, of the issue in yellow wrappers. This copy is inscribed by Carver: "For Rush - with good wishes. Ray Carver. 3-3-83." Spine and edge sunning to covers; near fine. [#914629] $3,000
(Marvin), Blue Cloud Quarterly, 1975. Vol. 21, No. 2 of the Blue Cloud Quarterly. A poem based on Hopi myth, believed to derive from the much earlier Anasazi culture. Inscribed by the author to Joe and Carol [Bruchac] in the year of publication, a nice association copy. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#025390] $80
NY, Random House, (1974). Uncorrected proof copy of this collection of poetry, her first book. Signed by the author. Publisher's ink comments crossed out in pencil on front cover; else near fine in tall wrappers. [#001343] $50
New Haven, Yale University Press, 1968. Review copy of the hardcover issue of this volume in the Yale Series of Younger Poets. Inscribed by the author in 1976. Cloth splattered with tiny ink dots; hence very good in a very good dust jacket with publication information written on front panel. [#001344] $20
New Haven, Yale University Press, 1968. A review copy of the simultaneous issue in wrappers. Inscribed by the author in 1976. Spine- and edge-sunned; near fine. [#001345] $20
click for a larger image of item #32274, December Songs Porthenys, [Self-Published?], 1988. Copy #58 of 100. Inscribed by the author to Peter Matthiessen and with a typed letter signed laid in: "I found this one copy of this tiny book, and I thought to send it to you the night before our departure for the old world (well it's all old and new isn't it?). I hear that you had a similar experience to what these little poems speak out from..." Chaskey continues in the letter with more personal news. More than 100 words. Poet-farmer Chaskey was the longtime head of Quail Hill Farm in Amagansett, New York, in eastern Long Island, and is considered "the spiritual father of the community farming movement." His first full-length book, the influential This Common Ground, was published in 2005; this chapbook precedes that book by nearly two decades. Near fine in self-wrappers. [#032274] $200
click for a larger image of item #20171, East by Southwest and Typed Letter Signed to James Welch NY, Simon & Schuster, (1970). The first book of poetry by the later director of the National Endowment for the Arts' Southwest Poetry Program. Inscribed by Claremon to Native American poet and novelist James Welch: "For Jim Welch, Amigo -- Neil Claremon." This is the simultaneous issue in wrappers. 1-1/2" triangular corner chip to lower rear cover; else near fine. Laid in is a typed letter signed telling Welch of a trip to Round Rock (photo enclosed) in the company of Simon Ortiz and also of a new book Claremon is working on (likely West of the American Dream). Also laid in is a photocopy of the "final draft" of his poem "At Canyon de Chelly." The letter and poem are folded; near fine. A nice association with the author of the poetry collection Riding the Earthboy 40 and the novels Winter in the Blood and Fools Crow, among others. [#020171] $80
(Woodbridge), Viet Nam Generation & Burning Cities Press, (1994). White Noise Poetry Series #1, a volume of poems and short prose pieces about the Vietnam War, written by a Vietnam vet who declares that he "takes pride in having been, and continues to be, a Vietnam Veteran Against the War." VVAW was a group of veterans who banded together to express opposition to the war and later to hold a public investigation into atrocities and war crimes in Vietnam. Inscribed by the author, "I wish you peace." Owner name inside front cover; fine in wrappers, with glossary of names and terms laid in. Uncommon. [#029735] $25
(Frost, Robert)
click for a larger image of item #33383, Robert Frost: A Living Voice Amherst, University of Massachusetts, 1974. Inscribed by Cook: "For George and Ethel Anderson/ with the affection of their Bread Loaf friend/ Doc Cook/ 25 July 1975/ Middlebury VT." Cook has also transcribed four lines of Frost's poem "Two Tramps in Mud Time." By 1975, Cook's association with Bread Loaf went back over 50 years, and the Andersons' nearly as much; a nice association copy. Boards splayed, foxing to top edge; a very good copy in a very good, foxed and rubbed dust jacket. [#033383] $100
(Frost, Robert)
click for a larger image of item #33382, The Dimensions of Robert Frost NY, Rinehart, (1958). Inscribed by Cook: "For Ethel and George Anderson/ Bread Loafers from away back/ and George the master Chaucerian/ scholar-teacher of our days. With appreciation -- Reginald L. Cook/ Bread Loaf 1958." Cook was an English professor at Middlebury College for many years, and involved with Bread Loaf almost from its inception, as Robert Frost was. Cook Commons, on the Middlebury campus, is named for him. A good three-way association, relating Cook, the Andersons and Frost, via the subject of the book and their longtime connections to Bread Loaf. Near fine in a good, foxed and spine-faded dust jacket that is fragile at the folds. [#033382] $100
click for a larger image of item #16169, The Southern Temper Waco, Motive, 1946. An influential essay by this poet and critic, who was an early and longtime friend of Henry Miller and various other literary and artistic figures. Inscribed by the author in 1952 to Mary Shore, a painter and friend of Charles Olson. Near fine in stapled wrappers and a very good, dampstained dust jacket with two small holes on the rear panel. [#016169] $125
Ontario, CA, Silhouettes Press, (1936). Laid in is a sheaf of typescript poems by the author, with holograph annotations by her. Very good without dust jacket (as issued?) and inscribed by the author. [#010520] $20
click for a larger image of item #33006, Typed Postcard Signed 1950. Written to the editor of the San Francisco literary magazine Gryphon, in its first year of publication, poetically requesting advance proofs, prompt publication, and retained copyright. The last line reads: "? If so, please let me know. Good luck anyhow." Signed, "E.E. Cummings." Cummings has also handwritten his Patchin Place, NY City return address on the front. Water droplets to the return address; a tape shadow across the text; otherwise near fine. The Fall 1950 issue, Gryphon 2, did feature a Cummings poem, entitled "Poem." [#033006] $375
Chicago, Poetry, 1953. Warmly and lengthily inscribed by Dahlberg at his contribution, "Ushant, A Long Lotus Sleep," an excerpt from a work-in-progress. Near fine in wrappers. [#017387] $125
NY, Atheneum, 1974. Inscribed by the author. A bindery error has caused the front free endpaper to adhere to the front pastedown at the foredge, otherwise fine in a very near fine dust jacket. [#001370] $20
Belfast, Field Day Theatre Company, 1983. Published as Field Day Pamphlet Number 3. Signed by the author. Fine in stapled self-wrappers. [#913912] $100
(Dublin), Gallery, (1983). The hardcover issue. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#913913] $100
click for a larger image of item #913911, Rumours (Dublin), Dolmen, (1977). Signed by the author. Slight edge sunning; near fine in self-wrappers. [#913911] $175
NY, George Braziller, (1978). The hardcover issue. Inscribed by the author to another writer in 1979. Pages foxed; near fine in a near fine dust jacket. Laid in is an autograph note signed by DeFrees, who has replied on the bottom and verso of a note written to her, transmitting a copy of the author's novel. DeFrees replies that she is working on an article on James Wright and offers to be in touch after reading her correspondent's book. The note is creased; near fine. Also laid in is the printed text of the poem "Dominance: A Museum Guide," as delivered at the installation of new members, Phi Beta Kappa, Massachusetts Nu Chapter, May 26, 1984. Folded; staple holes upper corner; near fine. [#022337] SOLD
(n.p.), Suffolk County Community College, 1985. Inscribed by De'Pazzi, who has two poems and a drawing in the collection and served on the editorial board. Near fine in stapled wrappers. [#031870] $20
click for a larger image of item #1381, Max. A Sequel Providence, Burning Deck, (1974). One of 300 copies. Inscribed by the author in 1978. Fine in self-wraps. [#001381] $20
click for a larger image of item #26970, Piss-Fir Willie Poems (n.p.), Tangram, (1998). A suite of poems "offered as an homage to the vernacular of northcoast working people," plus an introduction. One of 200 copies. This copy is inscribed by Dodge to another writer and signed "Jim." Fine in saddle-stitched self-wrappers. Dodge is the author of the novels Not Fade Away and Stone Junction as well as the underground classic Fup, about a magical duck. A nice association copy of an attractive and uncommon small press production. [#026970] SOLD
Candia, John LeBow, 1996. Limited edition consisting of two stories and thirteen poems. Of a total edition of 476 copies, this is one of 26 lettered copies. Signed by the author and the artist, Dina Knapp. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#912478] $100
Candia, John LeBow, 1996. Limited edition consisting of two stories and thirteen poems. Of a total edition of 476 copies, this is Copy #1 of 150 numbered copies in wrappers, signed by the author. Although not called for, this copy is also signed by the artist, Dina Knapp. Fine. [#912477] $45
click for a larger image of item #20396, Lord Weary's Castle NY, Harcourt Brace, (1947). Later printing of Lowell's first book, winner of the 1947 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. Inscribed by Robert Duncan to poet Landis Everson in 1948. Name ("Everson") on front pastedown; dampstained lower board edges; very good in a good, dampstained dust jacket with modest rubbing and edge creasing. A nice association. [#020396] $200
(n.p.), (n.p.), (1979). A prose poem with an illustration by Alaina Lara. Printed as Arboreal Abomination #1. Signed by the author. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#912481] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #26009, Geode/Rock Body Santa Barbara, Capricorn Press, 1970. The first book by the author of The Solace of Open Spaces and Heart Mountain, among others, a collection of poems. This is one of 550 copies of the issue in wrappers, of a total edition of 600 copies. Inscribed by the author in 1992. Mild edge-sunning; else fine. [#026009] $300
click for a larger image of item #1425, The Orchid Stories Garden City, Doubleday, 1973. The uncorrected proof copy of this large collection of stories and prose poems, in the form of tall, bound galley sheets printed on rectos only. Stamped "Final Galley." A number of the galley pages are loose but all are present. Near fine in wrappers and signed by the author. Scarce, fragile format. [#001425] $80
New Rochelle, The Elizabeth Press, (1972). One of 400 copies in wrappers. Inscribed by the author "with love". Fine copy. [#002078] $20
Berkeley, Sand Dollar, (1976). Inscribed by the author "with love". Near fine copy. [#002086] $20
Woodstock, Overlook Press, (1977). Review copy. Inscribed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#001429] $20
(Native American)
click for a larger image of item #32810, Original Fire (NY), HarperCollins, (2003). The advance reading copy of this collection of selected and new poems, her first poetry collection in 14 years. Signed by the author. Erdrich is best-known as a novelist: her first novel, Love Medicine, won the National Book Critics Circle Award in 1984; her novel The Round House won the 2012 National Book Award. One shallow corner crease, else fine in wrappers. An uncommon advance issue, and a scarce title signed in any issue or format. [#032810] SOLD
click for a larger image of item #27889, A Shade of Paden Hopewell, Pied Oxen Printers, 2006. A long poem by Eshleman in memory of his longtime friend, the artist Bill Paden, who died in 2004. Of a total edition of 50 copies, this is one of 15 numbered copies reserved for the poet and for the printer, David Sellers. Signed by Eshleman and Sellers. With a Hanga woodcut frontispiece signed by Bill Paden and numbered as one of 100 copies but, according to the colophon, no more than 30 were completed before Paden's death. A fine copy, from the library of author Clayton Eshleman. Letter of provenance available. [#027889] $1,000
(NY), Caterpillar, (1967). Poems by Eshleman, issued as Caterpillar X. Copy 10 of 300 numbered copies. Not signed on the colophon, but inscribed by Eshleman to Alan Brilliant of Unicorn Press. Tapebound in tall cardstock covers. Some offsetting to title page around the address portion of mailing envelope that is laid in; near fine. [#028759] $50
click for a larger image of item #6917, The Mate-Flight of Eagles (Newcastle), Blue Oak Press, 1977. The limited edition. One of 100 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#006917] $125
NY, Yale University Press, (2009). Inscribed by the author to Peter Matthiessen, who is quoted once in the book, on page 169: "That the snow leopard is, that it is there, that its frosty eyes watch us from the mountain -- that is enough." Near fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#031888] $80
click for a larger image of item #16201, I Have the World London, Fortune Press, (1967). A volume of poetry by this Gloucester, MA, poet who was a longtime friend and sometime rival of poet Charles Olson, who directed a critical part of The Maximus Poems at Ferrini. Ferrini's response was a 30-page love poem, which was published as In the Arriving and which Olson later said was Ferrini's best book. Despite a rivalry that has been characterized as "brotherly," they remained close friends throughout Olson's life. Inscribed by the author: "____/ the heart of the book/ Vincent." The recipient's name was deliberately abraded by the recipient. Fine in a near fine, modestly edgeworn dust jacket. [#016201] $350
click for a larger image of item #33166, Selected Poems Storrs, University of Connecticut, 1976. Inscribed by the author to the poet Edward Hyland "who's got the goods!" in 1978. Rubbing to the covers near the spine; else near fine in wrappers. A nice association copy between the Gloucester poet and Hyland, the poet from Manchester, who was one of the youngest writers to attend Breadloaf when he was 17 years old. [#033166] $75
NY, Atheneum, 1968. The issue in wrappers. Inscribed by the author. Fine. [#001455] $20
click for a larger image of item #28219, The Country Between Us (Port Townsend), Copper Canyon, (1981). The limited edition, and the true first edition, of her second collection of poetry, the 1981 Lamont Poetry selection of the Academy of American Poets. Her first collection was published in the prestigious Yale Younger Poets series. This collection became the paradigm of "engaged" and activist poetry in the late '70s and early '80s. One of 200 copies signed by the author. Preceding the trade edition by several months. Fine. [#028219] $350
Kathmandu, Bardo Matrix, 1974. Starstreams Poetry Series No. 3. One of 500 numbered copies printed on rice paper and signed by the author. Lower corner of last page torn, and spine bumped there, otherwise fine in stapled wrappers. [#001465] $60
NY, Stein & Day, (1975). The issue in wrappers. Inscribed by the author. Fine. [#001470] $20
click for a larger image of item #25084, A Further Range NY, Henry Holt, (1936). Later printing. Inscribed by the author to Sidney and Bill Watt "from their great friend Robert Frost" and dated in 1958. A nice inscription. Boards mildly mottled; near fine, lacking the dust jacket. [#025084] $350
Carbondale, Southern Illinois U. Press, (1978). First thus, a softcover edition of his scholarly study of Chaucer, published to complement his biography The Life and Times of Chaucer. Done by a university press, this title had a very small hardcover first printing -- 1819 copies in 1977, which was followed by a second hardcover printing prior to this edition. Signed by the author. One light corner bump, else fine in wrappers. [#019681] SOLD
(Port Townsend), Copper Canyon Press, (2007). Signed by the author. Additionally inscribed By Gerber to noted book collector Bruce Kahn in the year of publication, expressing gratitude for Kahn's support of Copper Canyon Press. Fine in wrappers. [#916202] $35
Fremont, Sumac, (1978). Inscribed by the author to Peter Matthiessen. A fine copy of the issue in wrappers. [#031906] $50
East Lansing, Michigan State University Press, (1999). Inscribed by the author to Peter [Matthiessen] in 2001. Fine in wrappers. With an autograph letter signed laid in asking for a blurb for his next book, A Second Life. [#031907] $50
(Port Townsend), Copper Canyon Press, (1978). A collection of poems, one of 1000 copies in wrappers of a total edition of 1100 copies. Inscribed by the author to poet Linda Gregg. Fine. [#001482] $25
click for a larger image of item #16232, Perennial Baltimore, Contemporary Poetry, 1944. A collection of poems, one of 1000 copies. A nice association copy, inscribed by the author to a painter, the wife (for a time) of a poet. A fine copy in a worn dust jacket severed at the spine. A fragile wartime book. [#016232] $250
click for a larger image of item #26742, The Black Interpreters (Johannesburg), Ravan Press, (1973). Second issue, with passages by Mandlenkosi Langa censored on pages 54 and 60. Subtitled "Notes on African Writing," with one section on fiction and one on poetry. This copy is signed by the Nobel Prize-winning author. The poet was supposedly issued with a banning order in October, 1973 and the passages quoting him had to be deleted or the issues pulped: later reports say it was actually Langa's brother Benjamin who had been banned. Handling apparent to rear cover; about near fine in wrappers. A fairly uncommon book in either issue, and quite scarce signed. [#026742] $350
click for a larger image of item #26987, The Black Interpreters (Johannesburg), Ravan Press, (1973). Second issue, with passages by Mandlenkosi Langa censored on pages 54 and 60. Subtitled "Notes on African Writing," with one section on fiction and one on poetry. This copy is signed by the Nobel Prize-winning author. The poet was supposedly issued with a banning order in October, 1973 and the passages quoting him had to be deleted or the issues pulped: later reports say it was actually Langa's brother Benjamin who had been banned. Owner signature on verso of front flyleaf; mild handling to covers; about near fine in wrappers. A fairly uncommon book in either issue, and quite scarce signed. [#026987] $350
Austin, Place of Herons, 1984. The simultaneous wrappered issue of this collection of stories and poems by a writer of Choctaw descent, with illustrations by the author. His second book, the earlier one having been published in 1972. Inscribed by the author to Joseph Bruchac. Fine in wrappers. Blurbs by Gary Snyder, Leonard Cohen, and others. [#025503] $80
San Francisco, Momo's Press, 1981. An early book by the Filipino-American author of Dogeaters, among other well-received books. Stories, poems and prose poems. This is the simultaneous issue in wrappers. Inscribed by the author to another poet. Rubbing to the spine folds; minor wear. Near fine. A good association copy. [#028437] $50
Pittsburgh, Carnegie-Mellon, 1986. Fourth book of poetry. Fine in a fine dust jacket and signed by the author. [#001538] $25
click for a larger image of item #1543, Street Fire NY, Viking, (1975). Uncorrected proof copy. Inscribed by the author. Publication date written on front cover otherwise fine in wrappers. [#001543] $20
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