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All books are first printings of first editions or first American editions unless otherwise noted.

NY, Viking, (1963). The uncorrected proof copy in comb-bound printed cardstock covers of this landmark volume relating the worldview of the Hopis, as compiled by Waters from the tales of thirty Hopi elders. A matter of some controversy in later years -- some people questioned the authenticity of the material or the qualifications of those who provided it -- this book nonetheless was profoundly influential in the Sixties, as another of the seminal volumes bringing some version of a Native American perspective and ethos to the mainstream society: this was a counterculture classic and a staple on college campuses in the late Sixties and early Seventies, thus contributing to the general push toward a more multicultural society. Waters' father was reportedly part Cheyenne, and Waters was an ardent admirer of, and advocate for, the values of Native American culture. A bit of corner creasing and dust soiling to covers; near fine. [#002732] $1,250
1986-1987. A collection of letters from Waters, mostly to his literary agent, Joan Daves, as well as related ancillary materials showing Waters at work in the after-market for his writing, with opportunities for later editions and film versions. Waters wrote primarily about the American Southwest, in particular the Native American experience. His father was part Cheyenne. The first typed letter signed is from Waters to his agent, Joan Daves, dated August 24, 1986 and concerns Lesley Ann Warren's interest in optioning the film rights to The Woman at Otowi Crossing and the contract for publication of a hardcover, illustrated edition of The Man Who Killed the Deer. It is stapled to a copy of the contract, with numerous marginal corrections and a retained copy of Daves' reply, agreeing with Waters that the intended publisher (Gibbs Smith) had overreached in the contract. An included exchange between Daves and Gibbs Smith posits a simpler agreement, while a retained carbon shows Daves reaching out to Ohio University Press to confirm they had no claim to hardcover rights. The second typed letter signed is from Waters to Keith Sabin, in Daves' absence, and is dated September 29, 1986 and describes the purchasing history of Flight from Fiesta and the current unwelcome "blitz" he, Waters, is undergoing from Ritz Productions regarding theatrical rights. Waters encloses an initialed copy of the letter he wrote to Ritz Productions redirecting their overtures to Daves upon her return from Europe. Both of these letters are stapled together with retained copies of both Sabin's and Daves' replies, as well as a retained copy of an earlier letter from Sabin to Waters saying they had been approached by Ritz and the initial contact letter from Ritz with an unsigned agreement for Right of First Refusal. Also included is a letter from Fiesta publisher Clark Kimball to Daves recommending the production company. The fourth typed letter signed, from Waters to Daves, dated April 29, 1987, again describes the publishing history of Flight from Fiesta and informs Daves that the publisher, Clark Kimball, has been approached by CBS-Columbia regarding film rights, and he includes Kimball's letter. Attached are the retained copies of letters from Daves to both Waters and Kimball, admonishing all that Kimball has no role in film rights for the title, and a later letter from Kimball acquiesces. The fifth typed letter signed, from Waters to Daves (August 3, 1987), delineates an additional inquiry regarding a film option for Flight from Fiesta and several leads on optioning The Woman at Otowi Crossing should Lesley Ann Warren's option expire. Waters takes Daves to task for not responding to offers already presented, for not keeping him informed, and for being about to depart for Europe leaving him without representation: "I don't like to end our agent-client relationship after so many years, but if the overload of work at this crucial time is too much for you, I don't see any alternative." A copy of a letter to Waters at about this point from Alton Walpole shows one of the interested parties facing obstacles bringing Otowi Crossing to the screen. Also, a letter to Daves from The University of Nevada thanks Daves for sending financials on Ohio University Press's Frank Waters: A Retrospective Anthology (included), but bemoans how infrequent the agent's communiques have become. However, the Daves-Waters agent-client relationship was ongoing in October: in the sixth typed letter signed in this archive, Waters informs Daves of yet another inquiry for Flight from Fiesta and asks her advice about payment on an opportunity he has to write the text for a book of photographs to be published by Arizona Highways (likely Eternal Desert, published in 1990). As mentioned, many of the letters are stapled; most are folded for mailing; in some instances they bear the agency's routing marks or highlighting. The lot as a whole is near fine. [#031770] $1,250
(Taos), (Taos Pueblo Governor's Office), (1970). Art by seventh and eighth grade Indian children from the Taos Pueblo Indian School's class of 1967-68. Inscribed by Frank Waters, who provides an introduction. The colophon states that this is a Special Collector's Edition, but this copy, like most that turn up, is unnumbered and without the trappings of the deluxe edition -- the tipped in signed artwork, or the signatures on the limitation page. The first printing was 1200 copies and is scarce in either the signed or unsigned issue. Waters, the author of The Man Who Killed the Deer and The Woman at Otowi Crossing, among others, often wrote on Native American themes and was of partial Cheyenne descent himself, a fact he seldom made known. Oblong hardcover; the tops of two pages have been unevenly opened, else fine without dust jacket, as issued. [#031472] $150
(Salt Lake City), (Dream Garden), (1982). The second of the Wilderness calendars, with work by a number of prominent photographers, and text by Edward Abbey, Tom McGuane, Leslie Marmon Silko, Ann Zwinger, Lawrence Clark Powell, Wallace Stegner, Barry Lopez, Frank Waters, William Eastlake, John Nichols, and others. This copy has been signed by Eastlake and Powell, and photographers John Telford, Tom Till, Fred Hirschmann and Chris Wangsgard -- several of the finest and most highly respected photographers of the natural world working today. Fine. [#010416] $125
Denver, Sage Books, (1950). The second edition of Waters' classic book on Navajo and Pueblo ceremonials, one of the first books to sympathetically explore Native American spirituality. Signed by the author. With the handmade bookplate of a Native American poet and his markings throughout the text. Hinges broken; good, without dust jacket. [#025807] $60
Chicago, Swallow Press, (1975). A speculative and philosophical view of Mesoamerican history and the indigenous Indian cultures that developed there, by a longtime writer on Native American issues. Owner name front flyleaf and spot to foredge; else fine in fine, price-clipped dust jacket. [#002734] $40
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