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All books are first printings of first editions or first American editions unless otherwise noted.

Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1959. His first book, a collection of short fiction including the title novella -- which was the basis for a well-received movie in the Sixties -- and five short stories. Winner of the National Book Award and a Houghton Mifflin Literary Fellowship Award. Top stain a bit faded, and a little rubbing to the board edges; near fine in a very good spine-tanned dust jacket with a few short edge tears. An attractive copy of an auspicious debut, the promise of which has been more than fulfilled by the author's subsequent writing career. Roth is one of the few novelists to have his entire body of work re-issued in the Library of America series -- a total of nine volumes, more than any other writer in the series. [#030786] $1,500
NY, Simon & Schuster, (1993). Harold Bloom's copy of the uncorrected proof copy of Roth's novel, winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award and Time magazine's Book of the Year; also voted one of the best works of American fiction in a quarter century in a New York Times Book Review survey. Bloom is perhaps most famous for his controversial book The Western Canon, which argued against "the Balkanization of literary studies" and presented an exhaustive list of what he considered to comprise the canon. Six Philip Roth books made it onto Bloom's list, including this title. With a typed note signed by Roth, from two years prior, laid in, in which Roth raves to Bloom about Douglas Hobbie's first novel, Boomfell. The note is folded, else fine. The proof has Bloom's notations on the front cover and summary page; handling apparent to covers; very good in wrappers. A good association copy between one of the leading novelists of his time and one of the leading critics of the day. [#032317] $1,500
[1969]. January 4, 1968[1969]. A note addressed to legendary Random House editor Bertha Krantz, as "Dear Bert," thanking her for a card and then quickly adding that he has found two errors in the text of "PC" (Portnoy's Complaint), despite not having read the book through yet. He describes the errors (on pages 9 and 64) and asks if they can be corrected in the second printing and whether Bantam will print from the second printing. Signed: "Make love, not typos,/ Yrs, Philip." Roth's dating of this letter is itself likely a typo: the book's official publication was in February of 1969; the letter was likely written in January of 1969. A bibliographically significant letter, pertaining to Roth's best-known work. Folded for mailing; recipient's marginal mark; author's name on verso; near fine. [#911125] $1,500
Boston/NY, Houghton Mifflin, 2000. A review copy of this novel that won the PEN/Faulkner Award. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket, with author photo laid in and several pages of promotional material (no review slip). Very scarce signed, especially as an advance copy. [#911248] $1,000
(Lewisburg), Press of Appletree Alley, 1995. A fine press limited edition of a story that first appeared in The Partisan Review in 1986. One of 195 numbered copies, signed by the author. An uncommon edition: although the stated limitation was 195, the press was selling unbound copies a couple of years after the initial publication date, suggesting that not all of the sets of sheets were bound. Fine in quarter leather, burgundy cloth boards, in a fine slipcase. The nicest edition done of one of Roth's works. [#911247] $950
London, Cape, (1985). The uncorrected proof copy of the first edition of this volume not separately published in the U.S. until the 1996 paperback edition. Slight abrasion to rear cover; else fine in wrappers. A Roth rarity. Roth became one of the most highly acclaimed American novelists in recent memory with a string of award-winning books in the 1990s and 2000s and inclusion of six volumes of his writings in the Library of America series. [#911956] $500
NY, Simon & Schuster, (1990). The uncorrected proof copy of this novel which was the first time Roth used his own name for the main character of a novel. He did it again in Operation Shylock and The Plot Against America, both books that accumulated multiple awards and award nominations. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. This is the only signed copy we have seen. [#911964] $375
NY, Random House, (1971). Second printing. Roth's send-up of Nixon and the Nixon administration. Inscribed by the author: "For ___ and ___, two good kids." Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#911936] $350
Boston/NY, Houghton Mifflin, 2004. Literary critic Harold Bloom's copy of the advance reading copy of Roth's "alternate history" novel, which imagines a pro-Nazi Charles Lindbergh defeating Franklin Delano Roosevelt in the 1940 presidential election. With Harold Bloom's signature. Age-toning to pages; near fine in wrappers. [#032316] $350
(NY), Library of America, (2005). The second volume of Roth's collected works: When She Was Good, Portnoy's Complaint, Our Gang, and The Breast. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#911999] $250
NY, Farrar Straus Giroux, (1987). The uncorrected proof copy. Voted one of the best works of American fiction in a quarter century in a survey conducted by the New York Times Book Review. Of the 22 titles named in that survey, Roth was the author of six of them. Promotional sheet stapled inside the front cover; slight spine-fading, thus near fine in wrappers. [#030383] $200
(NY), (Metromedia), (1971). Playbill for three plays based on three Philip Roth stories: "Defender of the Faith," "Epstein," and "Eli, the Fanatic." This is the Playbill for the Premiere Performance, on October 26. Fine in stapled wrappers. Also included is a Playbill from the general run, which has more ads and a change of font on the title page. Also fine in stapled wrappers. [#911937] $175
Franklin Center, Franklin Library, 1993. The Franklin Library edition of this winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award and Time magazine's Book of the Year; also voted one of the best works of American fiction in a quarter century in a New York Times Book Review survey. Signed by the author, and with a special introduction by him for this edition. Leatherbound, all edges gilt, with a silk ribbon marker bound in. Fine. [#911969] $150
Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1997. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, and one of the series of award-winning novels Roth published in the 1990s that, by general critical consensus, surpassed anything he had done before and elevated him to the front rank of American novelists, and a legitimate candidate for the Nobel Prize for Literature. Fine in a a very near fine dust jacket with light foxing to verso. [#030385] $125
NY, Random House, (1969). His landmark fourth book, a comic novel and one of the defining volumes of its time. Slightly musty; near fine in a near fine, mildly spine-faded dust jacket with a slightly offcenter fold. [#027471] $125
(NY), (Houghton Mifflin), (2009). The advance reading copy of Roth's 30th book, a novella. Trace corner wear; very near fine in wrappers. A scarce advance copy. [#028318] $100
[1962]. September 8, [1962]. A brief typed note signed: "Dear Mrs. Micou: Thank you for your kind note. I'm glad that you liked the book, and that you thought to write to tell me. Sincerely, Philip Roth." Although not stated, this note was written in 1962, and the book in question was Roth's first full-length novel, Letting Go. More than 50 years after this letter, Ann McKinstry Micou received her doctorate from Drew University with a dissertation on the power of place in the New Jersey fiction of Philip Roth, Richard Ford, and Junot Diaz. On paper that has been clipped down to 5" x 5", folded at the upper and lower margins. Mildly age-toned; near fine. [#032687] $100
NY, Vintage, (1998). The advance reading copy of the Vintage edition. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, and one of the series of award-winning novels Roth published in the 1990s that, by general critical consensus, surpassed anything he had done before and elevated him to the front rank of American novelists, and a legitimate candidate for the Nobel Prize for Literature. Fine in wrappers. [#911982] $70
NY, Simon & Schuster, (1993). The uncorrected proof copy of this winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award and Time magazine's Book of the Year; also voted one of the best works of American fiction in a quarter century in a New York Times Book Review survey. Fine in wrappers. [#911970] $70
NY, Bantam, (1973). The "Watergate Edition." Roth's send-up of Nixon and the Nixon administration. First thus, a new Bantam paperback edition with a new introduction by Roth. Fine in wrappers. [#911940] $70
(Mankato), Creative Education, Inc, (1993). The first separate appearance of the story "The Conversion of the Jews" from Goodbye, Columbus, Roth's first book. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#911972] $70
Franklin Center, Franklin Library, 1979. The Franklin Library edition of the first novel in his Zuckerman sequence. Nominated for the National Book Award. Leatherbound, all edges gilt, with a silk ribbon marker bound in. With a special introduction by Roth for this edition. Fine. [#911947] $70
Boston/NY, Houghton Mifflin, 2004. The advance reading copy. An "alternate history" novel, which imagines a pro-Nazi Charles Lindbergh defeating Franklin Delano Roosevelt in the 1940 presidential election. Fine in wrappers. Together with an audio CD on which Roth reads an excerpt from Chapter 1. Fine. [#911998] $70
NY, Farrar Straus Giroux, (1981). The uncorrected proof copy. Spine a bit faded, else fine in wrappers. [#911950] $70
London, Jonathan Cape, (2000). The uncorrected proof copy of the British edition. Winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award. Fine in wrappers. [#911991] $60
NY, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, (1981). Proof dust jacket for this novel featuring Nathan Zuckerman, one of Roth's fictional alter egos. Front cover and spine printed; rear cover and flaps blank. 19-3/8" x 8-1/4"; folded at the rear spine folded; else fine. [#019717] $45
NY, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, (1981). Colophon only for the limited edition of this novel featuring Nathan Zuckerman, one of Roth's fictional alter egos. The limitation was 350 copies; this is apparently an overrun page, unnumbered but signed by Roth. Fine. A nice way to obtain a Roth signature. [#013349] $45
Franklin Center, Franklin Library, 1983. The Franklin Library edition. Leatherbound, all edges gilt, with a silk ribbon marker bound in. With a special introduction by the author for this edition. Signed by the author. Fine. [#911953] $45
NY, Farrar Straus Giroux, (1988). His autobiography. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#911963] $45
NY, Simon & Schuster, (1990). Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#911966] $40
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