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All books are first printings of first editions or first American editions unless otherwise noted.

Eugene, Lone Goose Press, 1997. A limited edition of an essay from Crossing Open Ground, which was, after this edition, issued in a trade edition by the University of Georgia Press. Here issued with twenty-three 11-3/4" x 11" woodblock images by Robin Eschner, hinged in a continuous presentation almost 22 feet long, encompassing the text. An elaborate production, involving a number of individuals prominent in the book arts, in addition to Lopez and Eschner: Charles Hobson, the designer, whose work is included in the collections of the Whitney Museum and the National Gallery of Art, among others; Sandy Tilcock, the publisher and boxmaker; Susan Acker, the letterpress printer; Nora Pauwells, the relief edition printer; and John DeMerritt, the binder, who is President of the Hand Bookbinders of California. Of a total edition of 66 copies, this is Copy No. 20, one of 50 numbered copies signed by Lopez and including a unique tire-tread print from Lopez's Toyota 4-Runner, the vehicle used in the journey from Oregon to Indiana that is described in the story. Fine, in a clamshell box. At the published price: [#033029] $2,500
Eugene, Lone Goose Press, (1992). A limited edition of a single piece by Lopez, from Crossing Open Ground, about igniting and retaining wonder in the natural world. Copy 58 of 75 numbered copies signed by the author and the artist, Margaret Prentice, who provides several relief print illustrations to the text. An elegant production: handset and printed on handmade papers made by Prentice, using dyes made from colored plant pulp to evoke the woods to which the essay refers. Handbound into attractive wrappers, also made by Prentice, with a fern image on the cover, the whole laid into a folding clamshell box. Printed and bound by Sandy Tilcock, who also made the box. Fine. [#033028] $2,000
NY, Scribner, (1988). A collection of essays on "the bond between mankind and the land and man's heartbreaking betrayal of [it]." Inscribed by the author to Peter Matthiessen, "with gratitude for the illumination you offer, with great respect for your testimony." Dated in the year of publication. Near fine in a fine dust jacket. [#029259] $750
(Lexington), University Press of Kentucky, (1990). An essay on the ongoing consequences of the Spanish "conquest" of the New World and the need to rediscover the land the Spaniards "discovered." Warmly inscribed by the author to Peter [Matthiessen]: "respectful bow, abrazos fuertes." Laid in is a typed letter signed from Lopez to Matthiessen, dated in 1991, thanking Matthiessen for sending his book African Silences and sending this book in return: "As I grow older, or see more of this ravaged Earth, I find my voice less tempered." Folded, else fine. The book is near fine in a fine dust jacket. [#032496] $500
Kansas City, Sheed Andrews McMeel, (1976). His first book, a collection of "narrative contemplations" of the desert, told in a poetic, lucid prose, the clarity and simplicity of which is uncommonly suited to the subtleties of perception and expression it contains. Inscribed by the author in the month prior to publication: "For ___/ a woman of courage/ Barry." Additionally signed in full on the title page. Light splaying to boards; near fine in a rubbed, near fine dust jacket with wear at the spine tips. A nice personal inscription, and the earliest we have seen. [#027032] $450
Kansas City, Sheed McMeel, (1978). His second book, a retelling of Native American tales of Coyote the Trickster, subtitled "Coyote Builds North America." Lopez revivifies the tales, restoring their humor and vitality, and thus their power to affect the contemporary reader, rather than recounting them in the dry manner of an anthropologist dissecting a "subject." Signed by the author. Very slight bowing to boards; still fine in a near fine dust jacket worn at the lower edge and spine extremities and lightly rubbed on the spine. [#027034] $400
(Minnesota), Red Dragonfly Press, 2003. A fine press edition printing one story from Iron Horse Magazine, about the intrinsic rewards of a good day's work. Letterpress printed on handmade Japanese paper, with a title page woodcut by Gary Young. This is the deluxe issue, printed on Barcham Green handmade paper and bound in cloth and boards. Copy No. 18 of 36 numbered copies signed by the author. An additional 240 copies were issued unsigned, in wrappers. A couple small spots to rear cloth, else fine, without dust jacket, as issued. [#033030] $400
NY, Scribner, (1988). A collection of essays on "the bond between mankind and the land and man's heartbreaking betrayal of [it]." Inscribed by Lopez to a fellow writer in the field, "your support has made my road easier, my life richer - in simple gratitude" and signed "Barry." Dated in Lopez's home town, in February of the year of publication. Near fine in a near fine dust jacket with a short snag at the front spine fold. A very nice inscription and association. [#029938] $350
Kansas City, Sheed Andrews McMeel, (1976). A review copy of his first book, a collection of "narrative contemplations" of the desert, told in a poetic, lucid prose, the clarity and simplicity of which is uncommonly suited to the subtleties of perception and expression it contains. Foxing to top edge and mild bowing to boards; near fine in a very near fine dust jacket with slight corner wear and a small star on the front flap. A very nice copy, with almost none of the rubbing that typically afflicts this dust jacket. Review slip and publicity sheet laid in. [#027031] $300
[Berkeley], Tangram Press, 2005. An attractively produced limited edition of a story that first appeared in Seneca Review. According to the colophon, one of 165 saddle-stitched copies in wrappers; there was also a hardcover lettered edition of 26, done by artist book publisher Charles Hobson, who also contributed two tipped-in color illustrations to this edition. With an autograph letter signed by the publisher, Jerry Reddan, to Peter [Matthiessen] laid in, conveying both this Lopez title and the included broadside Haibun by Keith Kumasen Abbott. Both the Abbott broadside and the Lopez book are near fine. [#032497] $300
Kansas City, Sheed Andrews McMeel, (1976). His first book, a collection of "narrative contemplations" of the desert, told in a poetic, lucid prose, the clarity and simplicity of which is uncommonly suited to the subtleties of perception and expression it contains. Inscribed by the author. A thin book, published by a small midwestern publisher more noted for its religious titles than its books for the general trade, this book has become quite scarce in recent years. Owner name on front pastedown; small spine bump; near fine in a very good, supplied dust jacket with light wear to the top edge and some shallow tactile water rippling. [#018950] $150
NY, Knopf, 1994. A collection of stories, his first since Winter Count. Inscribed by the author: "For ___ -- / How lovely to have had your friendship, your affection, all these years. -- / Love, B." Spine cloth a bit mottled; near fine in a near fine dust jacket with a bookstore inventory label on the rear panel. A nice copy, and an extremely warm personal inscription. [#027038] $150
NY, Knopf, 1994. A collection of stories, the third in a trilogy that began with Desert Notes and continued with River Notes. This copy was sent by Lopez in the month of publication to William Rueckert, literary critic, coiner of the term "ecocriticism," and the author of "Barry Lopez and the Search for a Dignified and Honorable Relationship with Nature," which appeared in the North Dakota Quarterly in 1991. With a typed letter signed from Lopez to Rueckert conveying the book, in part: "You were so insightful about River Notes, I thought you would want to see the book, though I know you've moved on to other things." The letter is approximately 125 words, folded in fourths to fit into the book, else fine. The book has Rueckert's signature on the front pastedown under the flap, and is otherwise fine in a fine dust jacket with a corner crease to the front flap. In its early conceptualization, the trilogy was going to include Desert Notes, River Notes and Animal Notes. Animal Notes was never written: Lopez turned his inspiration for Animal Notes into the groundbreaking nonfiction work Of Wolves and Men, and Field Notes then completed the sequence. [#029327] $150
(Salt Lake City), (Dream Garden), (1982). The second of the Wilderness calendars, with work by a number of prominent photographers, and text by Edward Abbey, Tom McGuane, Leslie Marmon Silko, Ann Zwinger, Lawrence Clark Powell, Wallace Stegner, Barry Lopez, Frank Waters, William Eastlake, John Nichols, and others. This copy has been signed by Eastlake and Powell, and photographers John Telford, Tom Till, Fred Hirschmann and Chris Wangsgard -- several of the finest and most highly respected photographers of the natural world working today. Fine. [#010416] $125
NY, Knopf, 1994. A collection of stories, his first since Winter Count. Signed by the author and with an additional gift inscription from him on behalf of a friend. Spine cloth slightly mottled; near fine in a dusty, near fine dust jacket with a small vertical spine slice and a bookstore inventory label on the rear panel. [#027039] $100
(Bainbridge Island), (The Arbor Fund), (1998). Text of the Virginia Merrill Blodel Lecture given at the Blodel Reserve in September, 1998. One of 500 copies in stapled wrappers. Eight pages, with a short biography and bibliography. Fine. [#015248] $70
Athens, University of Georgia Press, (1997). A short story, attractively illustrated by Tom Pohrt, who also illustrated Lopez's Crow and Weasel. Signed by both Lopez and Pohrt on a Tom Pohrt-designed bookplate, laid in. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#015246] $45
Los Angeles, L.A. Weekly Media, 2002. Seven-page cover story by Lopez, mixing memoir, natural history and social analysis. Fine. [#019542] $30
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