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All books are first printings of first editions or first American editions unless otherwise noted.

Tuscaloosa, University of Alabama, 1947-1948. Two volumes of the yearbook of the University of Alabama, where Harper Lee studied law between 1945 and 1949. The 1947 Corolla shows Lee as editor of the humor magazine Rammer Jammer; sitting on the Board of Publications; voted one of the "campus personalities"; pictured as a student of law; and as a member of Chi Omega and of Triangle, an honor society of seniors who guide freshmen. In all, at least a half dozen pictures of Lee. Wear to the edges, rubbing to the joints; near fine. The 1948 Corolla pictures Lee only as a campus personality: before completing her degree requirements, Lee left law school for New York City, where she worked as an airline reservations clerk (and wrote To Kill A Mockingbird). From Lee's campus newspaper, as quoted in the book Harper Lee by Kerry Madden: "[Lee] is a traditional and impressive figure as she strides down the corridor of New Hall at all hours attired in men's green striped pajamas. Quite frequently she passes out candy to unsuspecting freshman; when she emerges from their rooms they have subscribed to the Rammer Jammer." Check marks in text; board edges worn; very good. [#023675] $1,000

NY, Exposition Press, (1969). A volume of vanity press poetry by Kelly, distinguished by a front cover blurb by Harper Lee, from a period of time when it was not uncommon for vanity publishers to simply warehouse their print runs for a predetermined length of time and then destroy them, with the majority of copies receiving distribution coming out of the author's allotment. For most vanity press works -- regardless of how many were originally printed -- the number of copies that ever made it into the marketplace probably averages in the low dozens. That fact, combined with the fact that Harper Lee has published so little other than To Kill a Mockingbird, makes this a rare occurrence in print by the author of one of the best-loved American novels of all time. This copy is inscribed by Kelly to Phoebe Lee "with fond best wishes." Kelly was a native of Excel, Alabama, less than 10 miles from Lee's hometown of Monroeville, Alabama. Small spot to front cover; near fine in a mildly rubbed dust jacket with a tear at the upper spine fold. [#027232] $375

NY, Exposition Press, (1969). A volume of vanity press poetry by Kelly, distinguished by a front cover blurb by Harper Lee, from a period of time when it was not uncommon for vanity publishers to simply warehouse their print runs for a predetermined length of time and then destroy them, with the majority of copies receiving distribution coming out of the author's allotment. For most vanity press works -- regardless of how many were originally printed -- the number of copies that ever made it into the marketplace probably averages in the low dozens. That fact, combined with the fact that Harper Lee published so little other than To Kill a Mockingbird, makes this a rare occurrence in print by the author of one of the best-loved American novels of all time. Kelly was a native of Excel, Alabama, which is less than 10 miles from Lee's hometown of Monroeville, Alabama. Fine in a near fine, price-clipped dust jacket with wear to the spine crown. [#026286] $350
On Sale: $228