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All books are first printings of first editions or first American editions unless otherwise noted.

1982. Three original pen-and-ink S. Clay Wilson illustrations for the German edition of Burroughs' Cities of the Red Night. Wilson was one of the group of artists who gained exposure in the underground comix of the 1960s counterculture. After R. Crumb, he is probably the best known of that group, and his images are almost certainly the most extreme: all of the underground comic artists sought to break barriers and defy convention, and Wilson's images are densely packed and full of overt sex and violence to an extreme degree. In this he was very much like Burroughs, whose verbal imagery and subject matter sought to shatter barriers, preconceptions and hypocrisies; the collaboration between the two of them seems in retrospect to have been inevitable. These drawings were displayed at the Los Angeles County Art Museum in the show "Ports of Entry: William Burroughs and the Arts," which sought to convey the influence Burroughs had had on visual arts. Extraordinary images, and probably the best illustrations ever of Burroughs' writings. Burroughs himself appears as a character in one of the images. Two of the images are 5-1/4" x 9", the third is 5-1/4" x 10"; all three are matted and framed to approximately 16" x 19". Fine. [#027316] $15,000
1988. An original Burroughs painting, which became part of the Seven Deadly Sins exhibition at The Writer's Place, Kansas City, Missouri, in 1993. Acrylic and spray paint on poster board: a gold triangle and heart spray-painted against a background acrylic image of black, blue and gray. Signed by Burroughs. 20" x 32". Mounted and framed to 24" x 36". Fine. Burroughs, whose Naked Lunch, Soft Machine, and numerous other works helped define the Beat generation and redefine the psychedelic novel, also worked in the visual media from the early 1950s on, experimenting first with collages and later with what he called "nagual art" -- art infected by chance, which had the possibility of giving the viewer access to what Burroughs called a "port of entry," an access to a different universe or a different way of seeing our own. In writing, Burroughs adopted the "cut-up" technique, with Brion Gysin, to achieve similar ends: a final product that was, in part, a product of chance or, at the very least, forces beyond the artist's direct control and manipulation. [#024825] $7,500
1988. An original drawing by Wilson for Burroughs' 1989 book Tornado Alley. This image was included in the exhibition "Ports of Entry: William Burroughs and the Arts" that was mounted by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 1996, and it is reproduced on page 140 of the exhibition catalog. Interestingly, the illustration in the book does not show some of the work that Wilson did, as it was done using nonrepro blue pencil which does not show up when photographed: Wilson's edits didn't appear in Tornado Alley and they don't appear in Ports of Entry, but they are quite visible in the work itself. Wilson, one of the great artists of the underground comix of the 1960s and beyond, whom R. Crumb has said was a major influence on Crumb's own work, collaborated with Burroughs on a number of projects. This is not only a significant work of art, and a significant association with Burroughs, but it is also signed by Wilson, who has added, "To Nelson" next to his signature: Wilson gave this work to his friend Nelson Lyon, who loaned it to the exhibition and is listed in the book as one of the lenders to the exhibit. This is, in effect, a three-way association: Nelson Lyon was the co-producer of Burroughs' Dead City Radio, a 1990 album of Burroughs reading his work (including pieces from Tornado Alley) against a background of experimental music by various artists. 9-3/4" x 6-3/4". Matted and framed. Fine. A notable association copy, and an artifact of one of the great collaborations that Burroughs engaged in. [#028091] $7,500
1979-1995. In the early 1980s, Burroughs collaborated with S. Clay Wilson on the German editions of Cities of the Red Night and The Wild Boys [Die Wilden Boys, Frankfurt: Zweitausendeins, 1980]. This collection includes correspondence related to this and other collaborations between Burroughs and Wilson, as follows: from 1979 to 1982, six items from the publisher to Wilson; from 1979 to 1985, three items from Burroughs' associate James Grauerholz to Wilson; and from 1985 to 1995, eleven items from Burroughs to Wilson. The earlier items, from the publisher and from Grauerholz, generally solicit drawings, convey approval for ideas, and give progress updates. The later items, from Burroughs himself (one typed note signed; four autograph postcards signed; six autograph cards signed), are more personal, frequently conveying gratitude for a gift or appreciation of Wilson's work. In one, Burroughs (according to a pencil note by Wilson, he is referring to The Chequered Demon) says "vintage Clay Wilson hilarious, horrible disgusting as life itself...Its fine its swell itsa gawdy taste of Hell." In another, in a card picturing a unicorn, Burroughs asks, "Did you see the Barnum & Bailey unicorn? I suspect it to be a goat." Several of the cards are holiday cards, and in one Burroughs wishes "All the best for 1986 and the time remaining to us all." In the last two items, Burroughs thanks Wilson for, respectively, the Graham Greene stories and for a cat book. He also complains about the heat: "Over 100 now for a week. Can't do anything but sit in my air conditioned house." This last card is signed "Bill Burroughs." All of Burroughs' correspondence items (excepting the postcards) have envelopes; one of the postcards is near fine; the others are fine; many depict Baaronurroughs' artwork. Also together with an original of Wilson's layout and lettering for the cover Cities of the Red Night [Die Stadte der Roten Nacht]: three hand-lettered sheets and one printed sheet. [#032933] $5,000
Frankfurt, Zweitausendeins, 1980. A unique author's copy of the first German edition of The Wild Boys, bound in full leather with a snakeskin onlay, and inscribed by Burroughs to the illustrator, S. Clay Wilson. Also signed by Wilson, with a note about the binding. Embossed initials of W.S.B. on the rear cover, with samples of the materials used in the binding tipped-in at the rear endpaper. Several scratches to the leather on the rear cover, else fine, in a folding cloth chemise. [#033128] $5,000
Paris, Olympia, (1959). The first issue of the first edition of his second book, a high spot of Beat and postwar American literature -- one of the three key volumes of the Beat movement, along with Jack Kerouac's On the Road and Allen Ginsberg's Howl. Published only in paperback in Paris by Maurice Girodias' important and risk-taking small press, in an edition of 5000 copies, three years before it could be published in the U.S. Signed by Burroughs in 1996. Uneven sunning and a bit of creasing to the covers; rubbing to the folds. A very good copy in a supplied, near fine dust jacket with a small chip at the crown. Burroughs signed this for a bookseller in Lawrence, Kansas, where he lived during the last years of his life. [#024504] $4,500
NY, Viking, (1973). A presentation copy -- three quarter bound in leather with gilt stamping and inscribed by Burroughs to Bob Jackson, and with a printed "Greetings of the Season" slip laid in from the publisher. Fine. The Maynard and Miles bibliography indicates that Burroughs himself had such a copy in his own collection, and that the number of such copies was unknown. We can find no evidence of any other copies of this edition turning up for sale, and it is not impossible that this is the copy M&M noted: Burroughs gifted a number of books to Jackson, whom he viewed as having saved his papers from falling into obscurity when Roberto Altmann's plans for an arts center in Liechtenstein fell through. Burroughs' papers were to have been a centerpiece of the research collection of the institute and instead were left in their boxes, untouched and unseen by anyone for over a decade, until Jackson's purchase. [#033077] $3,500
London, Bruce and Watson, (1973). First hardcover edition of this title, published in an edition of 1500 copies. Variant brown cloth -- M&M describes black cloth, and olive green cloth has also been noted. Inscribed by the author to Bob Jackson in 1984. Fine in a near fine dust jacket. An uncommon edition, especially signed (and signed authentically). [#033085] $3,000
1961. Unrecorded mimeograph typescript of a speech Burroughs gave at a meeting of the American Psychological Association, September, 1961, in New York City. Five pages, including personal and anecdotal experiences, arguing against the broad category of "narcotics" for both addictive sedatives and non-addicting consciousness expanding drugs. Together with a 1964 issue of Evergreen Review in which the speech is printed, with textual variations, including a change in the title, with "consciousness expanding" replacing "hallucigen." The talk/essay was included in two anthologies of writings about drugs, but the Maynard and Miles bibliography lists no separate printing of it, and this mimeograph would appear to be contemporary with the talk in 1961, making it several years earlier than any of the other appearances in print. Also, the term "halucigen" dates it as being prior to the point at which the term "hallucinogen" was settled on as the consensus descriptor. The magazine has a detached text block; the speech is stapled in an upper corner and fine. An unrecorded Burroughs typescript on one of the subjects that was most deeply embedded in his works. [#032856] $2,750
(NY), Grove Press, (1959)[1962]. The first American edition of this classic novel of the Beat generation, which was not published in the U.S. until three years after its Paris publication, and until a legal challenge to its banning was successful. Such authors as Norman Mailer testified as to the literary value and accomplishment of Burroughs' work. Basis for the 1991 David Cronenberg film featuring Peter Weller, Judy Davis, Ian Holm, Julian Sands, and Roy Scheider. Inscribed by the author in 1984 for Bob Jackson. Fine in a near fine dust jacket but for creasing and a couple small chips along the top edge. A very nice copy in the original, pre-zip code, dust jacket. The first printing of the U.S. edition was only 3500 copies -- smaller even than the original Olympia Press paperback in Paris, which had a 5000-copy first printing. [#033095] $2,500
London, John Calder, (1964). The first British edition. Inscribed twice by Burroughs, first to Richard Aaron, undated, and then to Bob Jackson in 1984. As such, a double association copy: presumably Jackson bought the copy already inscribed to Aaron, and then had Burroughs inscribe it again to him. Since they are the two people most involved in the sales of Burroughs' papers, and the preservation of his archive, it is a copy that resonates with literary history. Near fine in a near fine dust jacket. The first printing of this edition was 4000 copies. [#033096] $2,500
NY, Ace, (1953). Burroughs' pseudonymous first book, a paperback original bound back-to-back with Maurice Helbrant's Narcotic Agent. Inscribed by Burroughs: "To Bob Jackson/ William S Burroughs/ for William Lee/ April 12, 1984." Junkie was a straightforward narrative of Burroughs' experiences with drugs; the publisher chose to release it couched in an anti-drug context, as a first person example of the horrors of drug use, and bound with a narcotic agent's memoir. Mild rubbing and creasing to the corners and joints; age toning to pages; very good in wrappers. Maynard & Miles A1. The beginning of one of the most influential literary careers of the second half of the 20th century. [#033083] $2,500
c. 1983-84. Six black and white photographs (not stated but) by Abe Frajndlich, of William Burroughs, or details thereof. Two photos of Burroughs seated inside at a desk; two photos of Burroughs standing outside in a trench coat and hat; one photo of Burroughs' coat, hat and cane on the floor next to a baseboard heater; one photo of Burroughs' hands as he signs a copy of The Place of Dead Roads. Each photo is 8-1/2" x 11"; faint staining to a few margins, else fine. [#033147] $2,000
Paris, Olympia, (1961). The true first edition, published in Paris by Maurice Girodias' press five years before it came out in the U.S. This copy is inscribed by Burroughs: "For Bob Jackson/ all the best/ William Burroughs/ for Brion Gysin." Gysin designed the dust jacket. Modest foxing to pages edges and endpages; near fine in a near fine, mildly tanned dust jacket with rubbing to the folds. The first issue, with the 15 New Franc price on both the rear cover of the book and the front flap of the dust jacket. An influential book, part of the sequence that includes The Naked Lunch and The Ticket That Exploded. [#033109] $1,750
(Cherry Valley), Cherry Valley Editions, (1976). The publisher's "silver print" or "blue proof" of this book dedicated to Burroughs' parents. Inscribed by Burroughs in 1984. Together with an undated autograph letter signed from the publisher, Pam [Plymell] offering the recipient manuscript material for the book (not here present) in exchange for money to alleviate financial difficulties. Also together with the softcover edition of the published book, which is fine in wrappers. The proof has some sunning to the rear cover and a 5-digit number written in ink on the front cover; near fine. A unique artifact of the publishing process, and an interesting letter that delineates the materials that were assembled to produce the book, and also sheds some light on the details of publication. [#033063] $1,500
London, Jonathan Cape, (1970). The uncorrected proof copy of the first British edition (following a French edition) of this interview with Burroughs by Daniel Odier. Inscribed by Burroughs to Richard Aaron. An excellent association copy: Aaron was the bookseller who helped negotiate the sale of Burroughs' archive to Roberto Altmann in Liechtenstein, and he was also involved in the sale that brought the archive back to the U.S., when Robert Jackson bought it from Altmann. Aaron also published Burroughs, under his Am Here Books imprint. Near fine in a near fine, proof dust jacket, which is crumpled at the crown from where it extends above the proof. It is safe to guess that proof copies of this edition are scarce, let alone ones with a significant association. [#033081] $1,500
Paris, Olympia, (1965). Third printing of the original edition of his second book, one of the all-time great drug novels and a high spot of Beat and postwar American literature. Inscribed by the author to Bob Jackson in 1984. The price stamp on the rear cover has been partially removed. Rubbing to the spine and joints; near fine in wrappers without dust jacket, as issued (the second and third printings did not have the jacket). [#033094] $1,500
(San Francisco), Auerhahn, 1960. A collaboration by Burroughs' with his longtime friend, Brion Gysin. This copy is inscribed by Burroughs to Ted Berrigan in New York in "1953" -- we're guessing he meant 1963. Also signed by Gysin, who designed the cover and illustrated the book, in addition to providing his own texts. Printed by Dave Haselwood, who later reissued this title under his own imprint in 1967. This edition is estimated by the bibliographer at 1000 copies. Covers and four illustrations by Gysin. Very good in wrappers. Seldom found signed by both, let alone as an excellent association copy as well. [#033074] $1,500
Frankfurt, Zweitausendeins, 1980, 1982. Three copies of the German editions of these two collaborations between Burroughs and illustrator S. Clay Wilson: one copy each of The Wild Boys and Cities of the Red Night, each signed by Burroughs and Wilson, and one copy of The Wild Boys in a trial binding that was rejected by Wilson, who was displeased with the endpapers, but which is signed by Wilson, with his handwritten explanation: "Trial endpapers not to my liking. They corrected this error for the published edition. I wanted the endpapers to appear as wallpaper reflecting my 'take' on Burroughs' text "I see his face in every flower." Both copies of The Wild Boys have some rubbing to the covers; very good. Slight corner tap to Cities of the Red Night, else fine. All three in cardstock slipcases. [#033129] $1,500
London, John Calder/Olympia Press, (1963). The uncorrected proof copy of this drug novel, which consists of an amalgam of sections from The Naked Lunch, The Soft Machine and The Ticket that Exploded, as well as some material not reproduced elsewhere. Inscribed by Burroughs "For Richard Aaron" on the half title. Also on the half title, in another hand: "M. Farmer. Reading copy. Publication date: Oct. 31st, 1963." Published at the height of Burroughs' experimentation with the cut-up technique, this volume embodies that approach, as well as anticipating the later variation of it that we now call "sampling." A good association copy: Richard Aaron was, among other things, the person who negotiated the sale of Burroughs' literary archive to Robert Altmann of Liechtenstein. There was no U.S. edition of this title. Near fine in plain green wrappers, in a very good dust jacket, which differs from the published jacket by virtue of being trimmed to a shorter height and having had the flaps trimmed as well. [#033065] $1,250
1990. A sketch by Dupuis of Burroughs' Mugwump creature, from his book Naked Lunch, but never brought to life until David Cronenberg's 1991 film version, for which Cronenberg had Dupuis design the Mugwump with Burroughs' posture and the visage of a junkie. Dupuis had won an Academy Award for Makeup for his work on Cronenberg's film The Fly. A signed sketch by Dupuis, matted together with William Burroughs' signed unicorn bookplate. The sketch is roughly 8" x 10"; the bookplate 4" x 5"; matted to 13" x 21-1/2". Fine. Unique. [#033092] $1,000
1984. Photograph by Frajndlich of Burroughs in a three-piece suit sitting behind a table in a public space, smoking. Frajndlich is known for his portraits of photographers, and of others involved in the arts. Copyrighted, signed and dated by Frajndlich in ink at the right of the image in the margin, and titled, copyrighted, signed and dated in pencil by Frajndlich on the verso. Black and white. 11" x 14" Marginal crease to an upper corner, else fine. [#033146] $1,000
1984. Photograph by Frajndlich of Burroughs in a three-piece suit sitting in an upholstered chair. Titled "William S. Burroughs" and copyrighted, signed and dated by Frajndlich. Additionally inscribed by Frajndlich to Bob Jackson "in friendship." Black and white. 11" x 14" Marginal crease to an upper corner, else fine. [#033145] $1,000
(Cherry Valley), Cherry Valley Editions, (1976). The hardcover issue, one of only 50 copies. Signed by the author. Covers a tad skewed, with a small dent to lower edge. Near fine, without dust jacket, as issued. [#033064] $850
(Paris), (English Bookshop), (1965). A 12-inch long playing record album featuring excerpts from The Naked Lunch and Nova Express. Recorded by Ian Sommerville in Paris. The sleeve has a portrait photograph of Burroughs by Harriet Crowther, and on the verso liner notes in English by Emmett Williams and in French by Jean-Jacque Lebel, dated in 1965. Maynard & Miles G1a, preceding the American issue by over a year. Inscribed by Burroughs on the back cover to Bob Jackson, a notable association because of Jackson's involvement in purchasing and preserving Burroughs' literary papers. Presumably fine album -- no obvious wear -- in a near fine sleeve. Uncommon, and extremely scarce to find signed by Burroughs. [#033059] $750
Santa Barbara, Morrow, 1979. The first publication of this variant passage from Naked Lunch, here printed as a limited edition with a new introduction by Burroughs. Of a total edition of 500, this is Copy "J" of 26 lettered copies in boards, signed by Burroughs, the designer Patrick Reagh, and K. Anders, who provides the frontispiece. Additionally, inscribed by Burroughs: "For Bob Jackson/ all the best/ from Doctor Benway/ William S. Burroughs." Fine in a near fine, spine- and edge-sunned dust jacket. [#033069] $750
(NY), Grove Press, (1959)[c. 1962]. The first American edition of this classic novel of the Beat generation, which was not published in the U.S. until three years after its Paris publication, and until a legal challenge to its banning was successful. Such authors as Norman Mailer testified as to the literary value and accomplishment of Burroughs' work. Basis for the 1991 David Cronenberg film featuring Peter Weller, Judy Davis, Ian Holm, Julian Sands, and Roy Scheider. Slightly bowed, lower rear corner bumped, near fine with the topstain bright, in a fine dust jacket with a couple of tiny nicks at heel and a tiny bit of rubbing at the rear spine fold. [#911012] $750
(Geneva), Lagarde, [1975]. Copy No. 6 of 50 numbered prints of the photograph used to advertise Le Colloque de Tanger, a symposium celebrating the work of Burroughs and Gysin, in Geneva in 1975. This is an original print of the photograph used to illustrate the poster announcing the event, which features Burroughs' and Gysin's heads superimposed on top of statues of John Calvin and Theodore Beza. Although not issued as a signed edition, as best we can tell, this image is signed by Burroughs and Gysin, and dated in Geneva, 26 September 1975. A book and a portfolio of photographs from the event were issued the following year, in 1976. This photo is not to be confused with that publication. Black and white. 9-1/2" x 12". Small stains to margins and verso. Near fine. [#033148] $750
Berkeley, Blue Wind, 1979. The hardcover edition of this treatment for a science fiction movie, based on a 1974 novel by Alan Nourse, The Bladerunner. The famous Ridley Scott movie of the same name, which was based on a Philip K. Dick novel, got its name from this book, although not the story: the script writer found this Burroughs book, liked the title, and the producers negotiated rights to the name. Copy No. 74 of 100 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. A beautiful copy of a scarce Burroughs item. [#033058] $650
(Paris), Two Cities, (1960). Poetry and cut-ups by Burroughs, Brion Gysin, Sinclair Beiles, and Gregory Corso; Burroughs' third book, Maynard & Miles A3a, one of 1000 copies, and the first publication to use the cut-up technique. This copy is signed by Gysin. Spine faded; near fine in wrappers. [#033141] $650
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