E-list # 146

William S. Burroughs New Arrivals

Most of the following material by and pertaining to William S. Burroughs is from the collection of Robert and Donna Jackson, the couple that purchased Burroughs' literary archive, the so-called "Vaduz archive," from Roberto Altmann of Liechtenstein. Burroughs was grateful that his papers were repatriated to the U.S., since Altmann's plan to use them as the basis for an avant garde art institute in Vaduz had fallen through. As thanks, Burroughs gave Jackson a number of books, and inscribed many more to him, when he visited him in 1984. Jackson, a book collector long before he purchased Burroughs' papers, also acquired a number of other copies of Burroughs titles, including several association copies inscribed to Alexander Trocchi, and another group inscribed to Richard Aaron, the bookseller who had helped facilitate the sale of the archive.
1.
(Bonn), Expanded Media Editions, (1978). A bilingual (German/English) edition, comprising the two title essays and four other pieces pertaining to Burroughs' controversial attack-essay on Scientology, a group which he had at one time belonged to and was later excommunicated from. This is the second edition of the English language text, which was originally published in 1973. Outer corner bumped, mild rubbing; near fine in wrappers. [#033055] $50
2.
1992. A Burroughs-designed holiday card, featuring "Holiday Elf," and addressed to Mr. And Mrs. Robert Jackson, the couple who had bought the "Vaduz archive" of Burroughs' writings from Roberto Altmann. Signed by Burroughs. One sheet folded in fourths to make a notecard; near fine. Printed mailing envelope, with Burroughs' Lawrence, KS post office box return address, included. [#033056] SOLD
3.
1977. One of six copies of Grauerholz's first draft screenplay, based on a treatment by Burroughs of his novel Junkie. Signed by Burroughs and inscribed by Grauerholz, in 1984, with the note that this is one of six copies he made in 1977. Terry Southern had also written a screenplay in 1977 based on Junkie and on The Creation of Adam by Jacques Stern. Neither screenplay made it to screen. Photoreduced to 5-1/4" x 7-1/2" and velobound in plain black covers. 113 pages, printed on rectos only, with 12 pages of Appendices, including a chronology of the acts, list of characters, interiors, exteriors, locations, and song lyrics. "Junky" written on the spine; near fine. We could find no listing in OCLC nor any record of one having appeared on the market. An apparently unrecorded screenplay by Burroughs' longtime assistant, based on Burroughs' first published book: scarce, to say the least, especially signed by both and with Grauerholz's bibliographic history. [#033057] SOLD
4.
Berkeley, Blue Wind, 1979. The hardcover edition of this treatment for a science fiction movie, based on a 1974 novel by Alan Nourse, The Bladerunner. The famous Ridley Scott movie of the same name, which was based on a Philip K. Dick novel, got its name from this book, although not the story: the script writer found this Burroughs book, liked the title, and the producers negotiated rights to the name. Copy No. 74 of 100 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. A beautiful copy of a scarce Burroughs item. [#033058] $650
5.
(Paris), (English Bookshop), (1965). A 12-inch long playing record album featuring excerpts from The Naked Lunch and Nova Express. Recorded by Ian Sommerville in Paris. The sleeve has a portrait photograph of Burroughs by Harriet Crowther, and on the verso liner notes in English by Emmett Williams and in French by Jean-Jacque Lebel, dated in 1965. Maynard & Miles G1a, preceding the American issue by over a year. Inscribed by Burroughs on the back cover to Bob Jackson, a notable association because of Jackson's involvement in purchasing and preserving Burroughs' literary papers. Presumably fine album -- no obvious wear -- in a near fine sleeve. Uncommon, and extremely scarce to find signed by Burroughs. [#033059] $750
6.
Los Angeles, William Burroughs Communications, 1995. First thus, a CD reissue of his 1965 record album. Sticker removal residue and piece of tape on the shrinkwrap; still unopened and sealed. Fine. [#033060] $50
7.
(n.p.), Viking, (1992). The advance reading copy, marked "advance uncorrected proofs," of Burroughs' essay about and tribute to cats, and an account of his bond with an orphaned cat. Mild splaying to cover, else fine in wrappers. [#033061] SOLD
8.
NY, Holt Rinehart Winston, (1981). The first trade edition of the first volume of a trilogy, which includes The Place of Dead Roads and The Western Lands. Inscribed by the author to Bob Jackson in 1984. Small spot to foredge, else fine in a fine dust jacket. [#033062] SOLD
9.
(Cherry Valley), Cherry Valley Editions, (1976). The publisher's "silver print" or "blue proof" of this book dedicated to Burroughs' parents. Inscribed by Burroughs in 1984. Together with an undated autograph letter signed from the publisher, Pam [Plymell] offering the recipient manuscript material for the book (not here present) in exchange for money to alleviate financial difficulties. Also together with the softcover edition of the published book, which is fine in wrappers. The proof has some sunning to the rear cover and a 5-digit number written in ink on the front cover; near fine. A unique artifact of the publishing process, and an interesting letter that delineates the materials that were assembled to produce the book, and also sheds some light on the details of publication. [#033063] $1,500
10.
(Cherry Valley), Cherry Valley Editions, (1976). The hardcover issue, one of only 50 copies. Signed by the author. Covers a tad skewed, with a small dent to lower edge. Near fine, without dust jacket, as issued. [#033064] $850
11.
1979-1995. In the early 1980s, Burroughs collaborated with S. Clay Wilson on the German editions of Cities of the Red Night and The Wild Boys [Die Wilden Boys, Frankfurt: Zweitausendeins, 1980]. This collection includes correspondence related to this and other collaborations between Burroughs and Wilson, as follows: from 1979 to 1982, six items from the publisher to Wilson; from 1979 to 1985, three items from Burroughs' associate James Grauerholz to Wilson; and from 1985 to 1995, eleven items from Burroughs to Wilson. The earlier items, from the publisher and from Grauerholz, generally solicit drawings, convey approval for ideas, and give progress updates. The later items, from Burroughs himself (one typed note signed; four autograph postcards signed; six autograph cards signed), are more personal, frequently conveying gratitude for a gift or appreciation of Wilson's work. In one, Burroughs (according to a pencil note by Wilson, he is referring to The Chequered Demon) says "vintage Clay Wilson hilarious, horrible disgusting as life itself...Its fine its swell itsa gawdy taste of Hell." In another, in a card picturing a unicorn, Burroughs asks, "Did you see the Barnum & Bailey unicorn? I suspect it to be a goat." Several of the cards are holiday cards, and in one Burroughs wishes "All the best for 1986 and the time remaining to us all." In the last two items, Burroughs thanks Wilson for, respectively, the Graham Greene stories and for a cat book. He also complains about the heat: "Over 100 now for a week. Can't do anything but sit in my air conditioned house." This last card is signed "Bill Burroughs." All of Burroughs' correspondence items (excepting the postcards) have envelopes; one of the postcards is near fine; the others are fine; many depict Baaronurroughs' artwork. Also together with an original of Wilson's layout and lettering for the cover Cities of the Red Night [Die Stadte der Roten Nacht]: three hand-lettered sheets and one printed sheet. [#032933] $5,000
12.
London, John Calder/Olympia Press, (1963). The uncorrected proof copy of this drug novel, which consists of an amalgam of sections from The Naked Lunch, The Soft Machine and The Ticket that Exploded, as well as some material not reproduced elsewhere. Inscribed by Burroughs "For Richard Aaron" on the half title. Also on the half title, in another hand: "M. Farmer. Reading copy. Publication date: Oct. 31st, 1963." Published at the height of Burroughs' experimentation with the cut-up technique, this volume embodies that approach, as well as anticipating the later variation of it that we now call "sampling." A good association copy: Richard Aaron was, among other things, the person who negotiated the sale of Burroughs' literary archive to Robert Altmann of Liechtenstein. There was no U.S. edition of this title. Near fine in plain green wrappers, in a very good dust jacket, which differs from the published jacket by virtue of being trimmed to a shorter height and having had the flaps trimmed as well. [#033065] $1,250
13.
London, John Calder/Olympia Press, (1963). A drug novel, consisting of an amalgam of sections from The Naked Lunch, The Soft Machine and The Ticket that Exploded, as well as some material not reproduced elsewhere. Inscribed by Burroughs to Alexander Trocchi, author of Cain's Book, among others: "For Alex Trocchi/ good friend and good showman/ dead fingers talk/ invisible insurrection/ William Burroughs." "Invisible Insurrection of a Million Minds" was an essay by Trocchi published in Scotland in 1962 and in the Situationist International in January, 1963, which laid out the idea of taking over the world by means of art. Years later, the essay gave the title to a book of collected short works by Trocchi. Burroughs and Trocchi had a longtime, close relationship, and lived together for a time; Trocchi was a source for heroin for Burroughs during the time that they were both using the drug. They were famously invited to a literary festival in 1962 in Edinburgh where they were excoriated for their drug use and homosexuality by Scottish poet Hugh McDiarmid, who called them "vermin" and said they should both be in jail rather than on a lecture platform. Trocchi published Burroughs in Moving Times, which was a publication derived from Trocchi's Sigma Project, which grew out of the ideas in his Invisible Insurrection essay. Fine in a very near fine dust jacket with slight wear to the spine ends. A superb association copy, and an indication of how closely in touch Trocchi and Burroughs were at that time. [#033066] SOLD
14.
London, Tandem, (1970). Paperback reissue, second printing. Signed by the author. Age-toned pages; spine crease, and nick to crown; very good in wrappers. [#033067] SOLD
15.
San Francisco, Nova Broadcast, 1969. One of 2000 copies of this little pamphlet printed to simulate a newspaper story about the death of Dutch Schultz. Signed by the author. Near fine in stapled wrappers. [#033068] SOLD
16.
Santa Barbara, Morrow, 1979. The first publication of this variant passage from Naked Lunch, here printed as a limited edition with a new introduction by Burroughs. Of a total edition of 500, this is Copy "J" of 26 lettered copies in boards, signed by Burroughs, the designer Patrick Reagh, and K. Anders, who provides the frontispiece. Additionally, inscribed by Burroughs: "For Bob Jackson/ all the best/ from Doctor Benway/ William S. Burroughs." Fine in a near fine, spine- and edge-sunned dust jacket. [#033069] $750
17.
Santa Barbara, Morrow, 1979. The first publication of this variant passage from Naked Lunch, here printed as a limited edition with a new introduction by Burroughs. Of a total edition of 500, this is Copy No. 33 of 150 numbered copies in boards, signed by Burroughs. Fine in a near fine, spine- and edge-sunned dust jacket. [#033070] $375
18.
Santa Barbara, Morrow, 1979. The first publication of this variant passage from Naked Lunch, here printed as a limited edition with a new introduction by Burroughs. Of a total edition of 500, this is Copy No. 201 of 324 numbered copies in self-wrappers. Spine-and edge-sunned; near fine. [#033071] $85
19.
(Santa Barbara), Cadmus Editions, 1981. Copy No. 95 of 349 numbered copies in wrappers, of 500 total. Mild sunning and a bit of wear on the front cover; very good. [#033072] $75
20.
(Cambridge), (Blackmoor Head Press), (1971). A bilingual edition, French and English, of a selection of pieces first published in IT and the Los Angeles Free Press in 1970 and 71. Of a total edition of 500 copies, this is Copy No. 298 of 450 numbered copies in wrappers. Covers by Brion Gysin; layout by Henri Chopin; French version by Jean Chopin. Seminal writings on using disruptive media in the service of revolutionary activism for social justice. Minor sunning to covers; near fine. [#033073] $400
21.
(San Francisco), Auerhahn, 1960. A collaboration by Burroughs' with his longtime friend, Brion Gysin. This copy is inscribed by Burroughs to Ted Berrigan in New York in "1953" -- we're guessing he meant 1963. Also signed by Gysin, who designed the cover and illustrated the book, in addition to providing his own texts. Printed by Dave Haselwood, who later reissued this title under his own imprint in 1967. This edition is estimated by the bibliographer at 1000 copies. Covers and four illustrations by Gysin. Very good in wrappers. Seldom found signed by both, let alone as an excellent association copy as well. [#033074] $1,500
22.
San Francisco, Dave Haselwood Books, 1967. Second edition, a reissue by Dave Haselwood, who designed and printed the first, Auerhahn Press, issue, in 1960. Covers and four illustrations by Gysin, and signed by Gysin, who has added a continuation of his cover design motif below his signature on the title page. Very good in wrappers. [#033075] $375
23.
NY, Viking, (1973). A novel. Inscribed by the author to Bob Jackson in 1984. Tiny spot to top stain, else fine in a very near fine dust jacket. Jackson is the collector who bought Burroughs' "Vaduz archive" and preserved it for several decades until it sold to the Berg Collection at the New York Public Library in 2005. [#033076] $500
24.
NY, Viking, (1973). A presentation copy -- three quarter bound in leather with gilt stamping and inscribed by Burroughs to Bob Jackson, and with a printed "Greetings of the Season" slip laid in from the publisher. Fine. The Maynard and Miles bibliography indicates that Burroughs himself had such a copy in his own collection, and that the number of such copies was unknown. We can find no evidence of any other copies of this edition turning up for sale, and it is not impossible that this is the copy M&M noted: Burroughs gifted a number of books to Jackson, whom he viewed as having saved his papers from falling into obscurity when Roberto Altmann's plans for an arts center in Liechtenstein fell through. Burroughs' papers were to have been a centerpiece of the research collection of the institute and instead were left in their boxes, untouched and unseen by anyone for over a decade, until Jackson's purchase. [#033077] $3,500
25.
London, Calder & Boyars, (1974). The first British edition. Fine in a fine dust jacket. A beautiful copy. [#033078] SOLD
26.
1988. An original Burroughs painting, which became part of the Seven Deadly Sins exhibition at The Writer's Place, Kansas City, Missouri, in 1993. Acrylic and spray paint on poster board: a gold triangle and heart spray-painted against a background acrylic image of black, blue and gray. Signed by Burroughs. 20" x 32". Mounted and framed to 24" x 36". Fine. Burroughs, whose Naked Lunch, Soft Machine, and numerous other works helped define the Beat generation and redefine the psychedelic novel, also worked in the visual media from the early 1950s on, experimenting first with collages and later with what he called "nagual art" -- art infected by chance, which had the possibility of giving the viewer access to what Burroughs called a "port of entry," an access to a different universe or a different way of seeing our own. In writing, Burroughs adopted the "cut-up" technique, with Brion Gysin, to achieve similar ends: a final product that was, in part, a product of chance or, at the very least, forces beyond the artist's direct control and manipulation. [#024825] $7,500
27.
(NY), Viking, (1989). A collection of early writings, leading up to and including Interzone, the legendary early version of Naked Lunch which had been discovered among Allen Ginsberg's papers on deposit at Columbia University. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#033079] $50
28.
Paris, Belfond, (1969). The true first edition, in French, of the interview of Burroughs by Daniel Odier that would be published as The Job in English, more than a year later. Lamination creasing to covers; near fine in wrappers. [#033080] $125
29.
London, Jonathan Cape, (1970). The uncorrected proof copy of the first British edition (following a French edition) of this interview with Burroughs by Daniel Odier. Inscribed by Burroughs to Richard Aaron. An excellent association copy: Aaron was the bookseller who helped negotiate the sale of Burroughs' archive to Roberto Altmann in Liechtenstein, and he was also involved in the sale that brought the archive back to the U.S., when Robert Jackson bought it from Altmann. Aaron also published Burroughs, under his Am Here Books imprint. Near fine in a near fine, proof dust jacket, which is crumpled at the crown from where it extends above the proof. It is safe to guess that proof copies of this edition are scarce, let alone ones with a significant association. [#033081] $1,500
30.
NY, Grove, (1974). A revised and expanded edition, with a new introduction and the essay "Electronic Revolution" -- its first publication in the U.S. Interviews with Burroughs by Daniel Odier. Age-toning to pages; near fine in wrappers. [#033082] $50
31.
NY, Ace, (1953). Burroughs' pseudonymous first book, a paperback original bound back-to-back with Maurice Helbrant's Narcotic Agent. Inscribed by Burroughs: "To Bob Jackson/ William S Burroughs/ for William Lee/ April 12, 1984." Junkie was a straightforward narrative of Burroughs' experiences with drugs; the publisher chose to release it couched in an anti-drug context, as a first person example of the horrors of drug use, and bound with a narcotic agent's memoir. Mild rubbing and creasing to the corners and joints; age toning to pages; very good in wrappers. Maynard & Miles A1. The beginning of one of the most influential literary careers of the second half of the 20th century. [#033083] $2,500
32.
(London), New English Library, (1969). First thus, a reprint of the second British paperback edition, with small changes from the first printing not noted in M&M -- e.g., no history of the Olympia Press on page 5. Spine and corner creasing; very good in wrappers. [#033084] SOLD
33.
London, Bruce and Watson, (1973). First hardcover edition of this title, published in an edition of 1500 copies. Variant brown cloth -- M&M describes black cloth, and olive green cloth has also been noted. Inscribed by the author to Bob Jackson in 1984. Fine in a near fine dust jacket. An uncommon edition, especially signed (and signed authentically). [#033085] $3,000
34.
(NY), Penguin Books, (1977). First thus -- "the first complete and unexpurgated edition," according to the publisher -- and with an introduction by Allen Ginsberg. This is a complimentary copy, with the publishers "compliments of the author" card laid in. Offsetting to the inside cover from the card; mild age toning to pages; near fine in wrappers. [#033086] $200
35.
NY, Grove Press, (2000). Edited and with an introduction by James Grauerholz. Inscribed by Grauerholz in the year of publication. Fine in a fine dust jacket, with one corner crease at the lower front flap. [#033087] $100
36.
NY, Viking, (1975). "A Fiction in the Form of a Film Script," in which Burroughs takes the semi-coherent last words of a 1930s gangster as the point of departure for an imagined view of the dying man's inner life. There was a British limited edition with the same name that preceded this volume by five years, but it was substantially different in both form and content. Inscribed by the author in 1984: "For Bob Jackson/ all the best from the Dutchman/ William S. Burroughs." Fine in a very near fine dust jacket, with the publisher's name fading on the spine. [#033088] $375
37.
(NY), Viking, (1993). Edited and with an introduction by Oliver Harris. Laid in is a June 29, 1993 letter from the publisher, transmitting "one of the first copies." Also laid in is a July 16, 1993 typed letter signed by Oliver Harris to the recipient, who is listed in the Acknowledgements as having provided copies of letters for this collection; the letter attempts to encourage action on a follow-up volume. (In 2012, Rub Out the Words: The Letters of William S. Burroughs, 1959-1974 was published by Ecco Press, edited by Bill Morgan.) Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#033089] $125
38.
(NY), Viking, (1993). Both the uncorrected proof copy and an advance excerpt of this collection edited and with an introduction by Oliver Harris. The proof is spine-faded and near fine in wrappers; the excerpt is near fine in stapled wrappers. [#033090] $75
39.
Brighton, Urgency Press Rip Off, (n.d.)[1973]. One of 650 copies. Bootleg printing of a number of pieces by Burroughs that appeared in Mayfair magazine, a U.K. "Skin" magazine in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Offset printed on multi-colored pages. Near fine in stapled wrappers. [#033091] SOLD
40.
1990. A sketch by Dupuis of Burroughs' Mugwump creature, from his book Naked Lunch, but never brought to life until David Cronenberg's 1991 film version, for which Cronenberg had Dupuis design the Mugwump with Burroughs' posture and the visage of a junkie. Dupuis had won an Academy Award for Makeup for his work on Cronenberg's film The Fly. A signed sketch by Dupuis, matted together with William Burroughs' signed unicorn bookplate. The sketch is roughly 8" x 10"; the bookplate 4" x 5"; matted to 13" x 21-1/2". Fine. Unique. [#033092] $1,000
41.
(NY), Viking, (1995). Second printing. Burroughs' last novel, a collection of dreams. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#033093] $15
42.
Paris, Olympia, (1959). The first issue of the first edition of his second book, a high spot of Beat and postwar American literature -- one of the three key volumes of the Beat movement, along with Jack Kerouac's On the Road and Allen Ginsberg's Howl. Published only in paperback in Paris by Maurice Girodias' important and risk-taking small press, in an edition of 5000 copies, three years before it could be published in the U.S. Signed by Burroughs in 1996. Uneven sunning and a bit of creasing to the covers; rubbing to the folds. A very good copy in a supplied, near fine dust jacket with a small chip at the crown. Burroughs signed this for a bookseller in Lawrence, Kansas, where he lived during the last years of his life. [#024504] $4,500
43.
Paris, Olympia, (1965). Third printing of the original edition of his second book, one of the all-time great drug novels and a high spot of Beat and postwar American literature. Inscribed by the author to Bob Jackson in 1984. The price stamp on the rear cover has been partially removed. Rubbing to the spine and joints; near fine in wrappers without dust jacket, as issued (the second and third printings did not have the jacket). [#033094] $1,500
44.
(NY), Grove Press, (1959)[1962]. The first American edition of this classic novel of the Beat generation, which was not published in the U.S. until three years after its Paris publication, and until a legal challenge to its banning was successful. Such authors as Norman Mailer testified as to the literary value and accomplishment of Burroughs' work. Basis for the 1991 David Cronenberg film featuring Peter Weller, Judy Davis, Ian Holm, Julian Sands, and Roy Scheider. Inscribed by the author in 1984 for Bob Jackson. Fine in a near fine dust jacket but for creasing and a couple small chips along the top edge. A very nice copy in the original, pre-zip code, dust jacket. The first printing of the U.S. edition was only 3500 copies -- smaller even than the original Olympia Press paperback in Paris, which had a 5000-copy first printing. [#033095] $2,500
45.
London, John Calder, (1964). The first British edition. Inscribed twice by Burroughs, first to Richard Aaron, undated, and then to Bob Jackson in 1984. As such, a double association copy: presumably Jackson bought the copy already inscribed to Aaron, and then had Burroughs inscribe it again to him. Since they are the two people most involved in the sales of Burroughs' papers, and the preservation of his archive, it is a copy that resonates with literary history. Near fine in a near fine dust jacket. The first printing of this edition was 4000 copies. [#033096] $2,500
46.
NY, Grove, (1966). Second printing of the Evergreen Black Cat paperback edition. Includes the Massachusetts Supreme Court decision and excerpts from the trial. Very good in wrappers. [#033097] SOLD
47.
NY, Grove, (1964). His first novel published in the U.S. after his controversial and ground-breaking Naked Lunch. Inscribed by the author to Richard Aaron, a nice association copy. Fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#033098] $500
48.
NY, Grove, (1965). The first Evergreen Black Cat paperback edition. Very good in wrappers. Review excerpts on the rear cover by Mary McCarthy, Terry Southern, and Marshall McLuhan. [#033099] $25
49.
London, Jonathan Cape, (1966). The first British edition. Inscribed by the author, again for Richard Aaron. Slight softening to the spine ends; faint foxing to the edge of the text block; very near fine in a fine dust jacket. Uncommon signed, and a good association. [#033100] $500
50.
NY, Holt, Rinehart, Winston, (1983). The second volume of the trilogy that includes Cities of the Red Night and The Western Lands. Inscribed by the author to Bob Jackson in 1984. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#033101] SOLD
51.
NY, Holt, Rinehart, Winston, (1983). The second volume of the trilogy that includes Cities of the Red Night and The Western Lands. Inscribed by the author, this time to Bob and Donna Jackson, "charter members of the Johnson family, with memories of hospitality." The dust jacket flap copy writes "The original title of this book was The Johnson Family, a turn-of-the-century expression used to designate good bums and thieves, which was later elaborated into a code of conduct." Kim Carsons, the protagonist of this book, is a Johnson, and an "agent of the Johnson code." Fine in a fine dust jacket, with just a tiny nick at the crown. One of the better inscriptions we've seen in one of Burroughs' later titles. [#033102] $550
52.
1961. Unrecorded mimeograph typescript of a speech Burroughs gave at a meeting of the American Psychological Association, September, 1961, in New York City. Five pages, including personal and anecdotal experiences, arguing against the broad category of "narcotics" for both addictive sedatives and non-addicting consciousness expanding drugs. Together with a 1964 issue of Evergreen Review in which the speech is printed, with textual variations, including a change in the title, with "consciousness expanding" replacing "hallucigen." The talk/essay was included in two anthologies of writings about drugs, but the Maynard and Miles bibliography lists no separate printing of it, and this mimeograph would appear to be contemporary with the talk in 1961, making it several years earlier than any of the other appearances in print. Also, the term "halucigen" dates it as being prior to the point at which the term "hallucinogen" was settled on as the consensus descriptor. The magazine has a detached text block; the speech is stapled in an upper corner and fine. An unrecorded Burroughs typescript on one of the subjects that was most deeply embedded in his works. [#032856] $2,750
53.
London/Ollon, Covent Garden/Am Here Books, (1973)[1975]. Of a total edition of 200 copies, this is Copy No. 67 of 100 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket and publisher's slipcase. Published by Richard Aaron (Am Here Books). Scheduled for release in 1973, a paper shortage in Great Britain resulted in its not being issued until 1975, as a note in the Maynard & Miles bibliography indicates. [#033103] SOLD
54.
London/Ollon, Covent Garden/Am Here Books, (1973)[1975]. Of a total edition of 200 copies, this is one of 100 copies issued unsigned, but is here inscribed by the author to Bob Jackson in 1984. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#033104] SOLD
55.
(n.p.), Christian Bourgois, (1986). French paperback edition (in French). An early book by Burroughs that remained unpublished until 1985. This French translation was done by Sylvie Durastanti. Inscribed by the author in 1987. Fine. [#033105] $125
56.
(NY), (Strawberry Hill), (1975). Excerpts from Burroughs' works, with photographs by Gatewood. Nick to spine crown; foxing to the outer pages; very good in wrappers. [#033106] SOLD
57.
London, Aloes Books, (1975). A bootleg publication. Prints the transcripts of two tapes: Eric Mottram's radio broadcast on Burroughs and the tape of a meeting between Burroughs and Mottram. 34 pages; near fine in stapled wrappers. [#033107] $45
58.
(n.p.), Beach Books, 1967. Three pieces: one by Burroughs; one by Claude Pelieu; one by Carl Weissner. This is the issue in white wrappers, one of 3000 copies printed; this copy is signed by Weissner. Near fine in stapled wrappers. [#033108] $150
59.
Paris, Olympia, (1961). The true first edition, published in Paris by Maurice Girodias' press five years before it came out in the U.S. This copy is inscribed by Burroughs: "For Bob Jackson/ all the best/ William Burroughs/ for Brion Gysin." Gysin designed the dust jacket. Modest foxing to pages edges and endpages; near fine in a near fine, mildly tanned dust jacket with rubbing to the folds. The first issue, with the 15 New Franc price on both the rear cover of the book and the front flap of the dust jacket. An influential book, part of the sequence that includes The Naked Lunch and The Ticket That Exploded. [#033109] $1,750
60.
NY, Grove, (1966). The first American edition, revised from the first edition published in Paris by Olympia Press in 1961. Written using the cut-up technique and drawn from the same "Word Hoard" that Naked Lunch came from, it is part of the Nova Trilogy. This revised edition was to have been published by Olympia in 1963, and was announced, but was not published until Grove brought it out in 1966. This is the first edition of this text, and the first hardcover edition of this title. Signed by the author. Offsetting to the endpages; near fine in a fine dust jacket. [#033110] SOLD
61.
NY, Grove, (1967). The first Evergreen Black Cat paperback edition. Some underlining in the later pages, and some notations of textual changes there. Age-toned pages; short tear at upper front spine fold; very good in wrappers. [#033111] $15
62.
(London), Corgi Books, (1970). First thus, the second British paperback edition. A handful of later pages are marked, apparently noting differences between this version and another; the inside covers also bear some notes on that theme. Otherwise, near fine in wrappers. [#033112] SOLD
63.
NY, Viking, (1978). A collaborative effort by these longtime associates and an important documentation of their technique of assembling collages of images, both visual and literary. This copy is inscribed by Burroughs in 1984: "For Bob Jackson/ all the best/ William Burroughs/ for Brion Gysin." Fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#033113] $450
64.
NY, Seaver Books, (1982). First thus, a paperback edition. Inscribed by the author: "To Bob Jackson/ who got the Burroughs archives into America/ with friendship and respect/ William S. Burroughs/ November 3, 1985." Mild cover splaying, else fine in wrappers. An historically notable copy: Jackson had saved Burroughs' papers from falling into obscurity when Roberto Altmann's plans for an arts center in Liechtenstein fell through. Burroughs' papers were to have been a centerpiece of the research collection of the institute and instead were left in their boxes, untouched and unseen by anyone for over a decade, until Jackson's purchase of the archive. [#033114] $275
65.
Paris, Olympia, (1962). Inscribed by Burroughs to Alexander Trocchi, author of Cain's Book, among others: "For Alex Trocchi/ a cosmonaute of inner space/ in appreciation of his accurate maps/ William Burroughs." Additionally, signed by Brion Gysin on the final page of text, which features his printed handwriting. This is the correct first edition, published in paperback in Paris five years prior to the U.S. edition. Issued in Maurice Girodias' "Traveller's Companion" series -- a line of paperbacks that was largely dominated by softcore and hardcore pornography that could not be sold at all in the U.S. at that time -- few copies migrated to the U.S. until well after Burroughs' popularity here was established and the landmark censorship cases of the early 1960s (including that of Naked Lunch) had been settled in favor of increased permissiveness in printed matter. Spine slanted; near fine in a near fine dust jacket. Laid in is a bookmark (in French) announcing a 1962 signing. A superb association copy -- Burroughs and Trocchi were extremely close at that time -- and seldom found signed by Gysin as well. [#033115] SOLD
66.
NY, Grove, (1967). The first American and first hardcover edition. Like The Soft Machine, revised from its Olympia Press edition softcover edition. Signed by the author. Fine in a very near fine dust jacket: jacket has "ii" on the rear panel below the publisher's zip code, not mentioned in Maynard & Miles. [#033116] $300
67.
London, Calder and Boyars, (1968). The first British edition. Inscribed by the author to Richard Aaron, the bookseller and publisher, and a key figure in Burroughs' biography, especially with respect to the placement of Burroughs' papers. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#033117] $650
68.
London, Calder and Boyars, (1968). The first British paperback edition, M&M A6e. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#033118] $125
69.
NY, Grove, (1968). Second printing of the Grove paperback edition. Inscribed by the author to Richard Aaron; a good association. Near fine in wrappers. [#033119] SOLD
70.
(London), Corgi, (1971). First thus, the second British paperback edition. Signed by the author. Near fine in wrappers. M&M A6f. [#033120] SOLD
71.
(NY), Viking, (1987). The third volume in the trilogy that includes Cities of the Red Night and The Place of Dead Roads. Inscribed by the author with holiday wishes in December, 1987. Laid in is a typed letter signed by James Grauerholz transmitting the book and promising two others. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#033121] SOLD
72.
Northridge, Lord John Press, 1978. A broadside excerpt from the then-forthcoming Cities of the Red Night, with an illustration by James R. Silke. Of a total edition of 126 copies, this is Copy No. 49 of 100 numbered copies signed by the author and the artist. 14" x 20". Minor surface foxing and edge wear; still about near fine. [#033122] $250
73.
London, Aloes, [1973]. One of 1000 copies. Only issued in wrappers. Inscribed by the author to Richard Aaron. Previously published Burroughs pieces, along with "Burroughs in Tangier" by Paul Bowles. Fine. [#033123] $250
74.
London, Aloes, (n.d.). Second printing. One of 500 copies. This copy is inscribed by Burroughs to Bob Jackson in 1984. Near fine in stapled wrappers. [#033124] $125
75.
NY, Grove Press/Dell, (1971). First printing of the Dell paperback. Inscribed by the author to Richard Aaron on March 17, 1973, which, the author comments, "commemorates a good day" and is signed "with all the best from the wild boys/ William S. Burroughs." Near fine in wrappers. [#033125] SOLD
76.
London, Calder and Boyars, (1972). An advance copy of the British edition, in the form of folded and gathered sheets, laid into a dust jacket. Inscribed by the author to Richard Aaron, "all the best wishes from the wild boys." A letter from the publisher to a Scottish journalist identifying this as a proof copy and announcing the publication party is laid in. Fine, in a near fine dust jacket. [#033126] $450
77.
London, Calder and Boyars, (1972). An advance copy of the British edition, in the form of folded and gathered sheets, laid into a dust jacket. Inscribed by the author "For Bill Butler/ un vieux combattant/ William S. Burroughs." Butler was, among other things, the founder of Unicorn Books, which in 1968 had been the focus of an obscenity trial in the U.K. for publishing J.G. Ballard's Why I Want to Fuck Ronald Reagan. This battle is doubtless one of the ones Burroughs alludes to in the inscription, calling Butler "an old fighter." Fine, in a dust jacket with just a bit of wear to the crown and fading to the spine title, otherwise near fine. A nice association copy. [#033127] SOLD
78.
Frankfurt, Zweitausendeins, 1980. A unique author's copy of the first German edition of The Wild Boys, bound in full leather with a snakeskin onlay, and inscribed by Burroughs to the illustrator, S. Clay Wilson. Also signed by Wilson, with a note about the binding. Embossed initials of W.S.B. on the rear cover, with samples of the materials used in the binding tipped-in at the rear endpaper. Several scratches to the leather on the rear cover, else fine, in a folding cloth chemise. [#033128] $5,000
79.
Frankfurt, Zweitausendeins, 1980, 1982. Three copies of the German editions of these two collaborations between Burroughs and illustrator S. Clay Wilson: one copy each of The Wild Boys and Cities of the Red Night, each signed by Burroughs and Wilson, and one copy of The Wild Boys in a trial binding that was rejected by Wilson, who was displeased with the endpapers, but which is signed by Wilson, with his handwritten explanation: "Trial endpapers not to my liking. They corrected this error for the published edition. I wanted the endpapers to appear as wallpaper reflecting my 'take' on Burroughs' text "I see his face in every flower." Both copies of The Wild Boys have some rubbing to the covers; very good. Slight corner tap to Cities of the Red Night, else fine. All three in cardstock slipcases. [#033129] $1,500
80.
(NY), Giorno Poetry Systems, (1975). A double LP, with one LP for Giorno and one for Burroughs. Burroughs' works include excerpts from The Wild Boys, Ah Pook is Here, Cities of the Red Night, Junkie, Naked Lunch, and Exterminator. Gatefold format, and inscribed by Burroughs to Bob Jackson inside the front cover. Presumably fine record albums -- no obvious wear -- in a very near fine sleeve. Very uncommon signed or inscribed. [#033130] $375
81.
(San Francisco), City Lights Books, (1963). A volume of letters between Burroughs and Ginsberg that borders on being an epistolary novel, and deals with their respective experiences, over a number of years, with the South American hallucinogenic drug yage, also known as ayahuasca. Inscribed by Burroughs to Richard Aaron in the year of publication: "For Richard Aaron/ Exchange of manuscripts on Monday July 3, 1963/ This book concerns time compression 1952-53/ William S. Burroughs." Spine-cocked; inexpertly tape reinforced at the front hinge; only good in wrappers, but a contemporary inscription (with some sort of historical content) and a good association, both of which are uncommon. [#033131] $450
82.
(San Francisco), City Lights Books, (1971). Sixth printing. Inscribed by Burroughs in 1984, "for Bob Jackson/ who knows the/ area better..." Near fine in wrappers. [#033132] $200
83.
(Wiesbaden), Limes, (1964). A German edition, Maynard & Miles D22. Signed by Burroughs. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#033133] $150
84.
London, Sphere Books, (1971). First Sphere books paperback edition of the autobiographical first novel by William Burroughs' son, who died in 1981 at the age of 33 from illness attributed to excessive drug use. Age-toned pages; near fine. [#033134] $45
85.
[Philadelphia], [1965]. Daniel Lauffer's "Occasional Magazine of Poetry," which published only this one issue, a hand-printed edition of 243 copies. Features a collaborative cut-up parody by Lauffer and Burroughs, string-tied inside the rear flap. Slight scuffing and wear to covers, otherwise near fine in saddle-stitched wrappers. Uncommon. [#033135] $175
86.
(Paris), (Agentzia), (1972). "Tickertape" by Burroughs appears as the preface to this publication; M&M B63. Signed by Burroughs and inscribed by Herman and Weissner, "To Anthony/ Hello from the/ Kraut outpost/ of the Conspiracy." Very near fine in self-wrappers. [#033136] $300
87.
NY/Baltimore, Blast/Dolphin-Moon, (1991). Seven-page foreword by Burroughs, which ends with the exhortation "Just Say No to Drug Hysteria!" Near fine in wrappers. [#033137] SOLD
88.
Boston, Little Brown, (1998). A biography, heavily illustrated and printed on multi-colored paper. Fine in a fine dust jacket. An attractive and visually engaging publication. [#033138] $35
89.
Cambridge, Harvard, (1933). The freshman yearbook for Burroughs' class. Includes a photograph of William Seward Burroughs at 19 years old. One of Burroughs' classmates was James Laughlin, who founded New Directions publishing company in 1936 -- each of the two playing important but disparate roles in shaping the American literature of the next half century. Rubbing to joints; play in the binding; owner name front flyleaf and a few pencil check marks next to some photos. A very good copy. [#033002] $375
90.
London, Knuller, 1970. Underground newspaper, previously known as International Times. Includes pieces by Burroughs, Allen Ginsberg, and Alex Trocchi, and an interview with John Lennon and Yoko Ono, as well as a Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers comic on the front cover. Small ink name on inner page margin; acidifying paper; modest edge wear; very good. [#033139] SOLD
91.
(West Glover), Something Else Press, (1973). With texts by Burroughs and Ian Sommerville; edited by Jan Herman. One of 500 hardcover copies. Fine in a very good, rubbed and spine-faded dust jacket. [#033140] $175
92.
(Paris), Two Cities, (1960). Poetry and cut-ups by Burroughs, Brion Gysin, Sinclair Beiles, and Gregory Corso; Burroughs' third book, Maynard & Miles A3a, one of 1000 copies, and the first publication to use the cut-up technique. This copy is signed by Gysin. Spine faded; near fine in wrappers. [#033141] $650
93.
San Francisco, Beach Books, (1968). Second edition, and first American edition, issued in a printing believed to have been 1000 copies. Near fine in wrappers. [#033142] $75
94.
[1965]. The third and final issue of Charles Plymell's publication Now. Contributors include Burroughs, Plymell, Claude Pelieu, Philip Whalen, and others. 11" x 17". String-tied. String loosening; some tanning to paper; near fine. M&M C129. [#033143] SOLD
95.
1982. Three original pen-and-ink S. Clay Wilson illustrations for the German edition of Burroughs' Cities of the Red Night. Wilson was one of the group of artists who gained exposure in the underground comix of the 1960s counterculture. After R. Crumb, he is probably the best known of that group, and his images are almost certainly the most extreme: all of the underground comic artists sought to break barriers and defy convention, and Wilson's images are densely packed and full of overt sex and violence to an extreme degree. In this he was very much like Burroughs, whose verbal imagery and subject matter sought to shatter barriers, preconceptions and hypocrisies; the collaboration between the two of them seems in retrospect to have been inevitable. These drawings were displayed at the Los Angeles County Art Museum in the show "Ports of Entry: William Burroughs and the Arts," which sought to convey the influence Burroughs had had on visual arts. Extraordinary images, and probably the best illustrations ever of Burroughs' writings. Burroughs himself appears as a character in one of the images. Two of the images are 5-1/4" x 9", the third is 5-1/4" x 10"; all three are matted and framed to approximately 16" x 19". Fine. [#027316] $15,000
96.
1984. Photograph by Frajndlich of Burroughs in a three-piece suit sitting in an upholstered chair. Titled "William S. Burroughs" and copyrighted, signed and dated by Frajndlich. Additionally inscribed by Frajndlich to Bob Jackson "in friendship." Black and white. 11" x 14" Marginal crease to an upper corner, else fine. [#033145] $1,000
97.
1984. Photograph by Frajndlich of Burroughs in a three-piece suit sitting behind a table in a public space, smoking. Frajndlich is known for his portraits of photographers, and of others involved in the arts. Copyrighted, signed and dated by Frajndlich in ink at the right of the image in the margin, and titled, copyrighted, signed and dated in pencil by Frajndlich on the verso. Black and white. 11" x 14" Marginal crease to an upper corner, else fine. [#033146] $1,000
98.
c. 1983-84. Six black and white photographs (not stated but) by Abe Frajndlich, of William Burroughs, or details thereof. Two photos of Burroughs seated inside at a desk; two photos of Burroughs standing outside in a trench coat and hat; one photo of Burroughs' coat, hat and cane on the floor next to a baseboard heater; one photo of Burroughs' hands as he signs a copy of The Place of Dead Roads. Each photo is 8-1/2" x 11"; faint staining to a few margins, else fine. [#033147] $2,000
99.
(Geneva), Lagarde, [1975]. Copy No. 6 of 50 numbered prints of the photograph used to advertise Le Colloque de Tanger, a symposium celebrating the work of Burroughs and Gysin, in Geneva in 1975. This is an original print of the photograph used to illustrate the poster announcing the event, which features Burroughs' and Gysin's heads superimposed on top of statues of John Calvin and Theodore Beza. Although not issued as a signed edition, as best we can tell, this image is signed by Burroughs and Gysin, and dated in Geneva, 26 September 1975. A book and a portfolio of photographs from the event were issued the following year, in 1976. This photo is not to be confused with that publication. Black and white. 9-1/2" x 12". Small stains to margins and verso. Near fine. [#033148] $750
100.
c. 1973. Color snapshot, 7" x 5", of Burroughs, Brion Gysin [?], and an unidentified boy, sitting outdoors on a stone wall. Photographer unknown. Printing date on verso is 1973. Near fine. [#033149] $250
101.
(NY), R.A.T., (1969). An underground newspaper, featuring Burroughs with a unique take on the Woodstock Festival ("a landmark in biologic war"). This issue also includes a Paul McCartney memorial poster (1969 being the year of the rumor of his 1966 demise), and pieces by Allen Ginsberg on Jack Kerouac, Jerry Rubin on Chicago, and the Electric Circus, among others. Tanned, with a few edge tears; near fine. [#033150] SOLD
102.
(Hadley), Ken Lopez Bookseller, (2005). A catalog/brochure describing the Burroughs archive previously known as the "Vaduz archive" and printing in facsimile a number of items from the archive, including Brion Gysin calligraphy, photographs of Burroughs and others, visual poetry by Burroughs, and other items. An overview of the archive, with description of its contents and essays on its history and importance in the context of 20th century literature. The archive was purchased by the Berg Collection at the New York Public Library. Fine in wrappers. [#024827] $20
103.
London, Secker & Warburg, (1967). A collection of Paris Review interviews. First U.K. edition, which includes interviews with Burroughs, Ginsberg, Mailer, Celine, Pinter, Albee, Cocteau, Bellow, Blaise Cendrars, and others. M&M B33b. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#033151] $45
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New Arrivals Catalog 168