E-list # 138

Poetry

(Willimantic), Curbstone Press, (2004). The uncorrected proof copy of the third book of poetry by this writer of mixed Native American/Chicano/European ancestry. Fine in wrappers. [#025741] $60
NY, Dutton, (1987). A review copy of this collection of poetry. Mild age toning to pages, else fine in a fine dust jacket, with review slip, author photo and promotional pages laid in. [#916868] $250
Undated. A one-page prose poem, typed, and signed "Clark Ashton Smith/Auburn, California." This version of the prose poem differs in a number of particulars from the published version, which was included in The Abominations of Yondo (Arkham House, 1960) and Poems in Prose (Arkham House, 1965). Previously folded in thirds but now in a custom binder, bearing the bookplate of horror writer Stanley Wiater, from whose library this came. Fine, with a letter laid in to Wiater from Roy Squires, the noted science fiction collector and dealer, from whom Wiater purchased it. Squires' lengthy letter comments extensively on the appallingly high prices "being asked -- and paid -- for the more desirable Arkham House books," in 1972, and then goes on to justify the high price Wiater had just paid for the Clark Ashton Smith manuscript, and says that he knows of only four prose poem manuscripts by Clark Ashton Smith in existence -- this one; one that he himself still had; and two that Smith's widow had at that time. A rare typescript by one of the most important American horror writers of the 20th century, with a long, illuminating letter from one of the great collectors and dealers in the field, and from the library of a horror writer who has been a three-time winner of the Bram Stoker Award, given by the Horror Writers of America. [#029000] ON HOLD
$5,500
London, Fulcrum Press, (1967). Second printing of this volume of collected poems, identified on the copyright page as a "second edition." Includes the contents of Snyder's early volumes, Myths & Texts and Riprap & Cold Mountain Poems, as well as about half the poems that appeared later in the year in the collection The Back Country, plus one more group of unpublished poems. Inscribed (apparently twice) by Snyder to Clayton Eshleman: "For Clayton Eshleman from these days in Kyoto. Gary Snyder." And then: "until III 92/ with gratitude for his Bodhi Sattva generosity to poetry -- a life work --." With Eshleman's 1967 ownership signature. Near fine in a very good dust jacket with small chips at the spine extremities and the start of splitting to the folds there. A wonderful association copy between two poets and longtime friends. [#030814] $250
1991. A two-page photocopy of Snyder's bio, recounting travels, influences, jobs and interests. With brief bibliographical checklist. Folded in half; near fine. From the collection of Clayton Eshleman, and probably given by Snyder to Eshleman who would have introduced him at his 1996 reading in Ypsilanti. [#030821] $100
San Francisco, North Point Press, 1986. Second printing of this collection of poetry, which includes early work dating from up to 13 years before his first book. Inscribed by Snyder to another writer in 1990. Corner crease; near fine in wrappers. A nice association copy; while Snyder has been extremely generous about signing books over the years, significant association copies seldom show up on the market. [#023964] $70
Washington, DC, Counterpoint, (1996). The uncorrected proof copy of the complete sequence of poems under this title, which Snyder began in 1956 and of which sections had been published over the years in literary magazines and a chapbook in the early 1960s. From the library of Clayton Eshleman, and with Eshleman's notes in the text. A hint of spine sunning, else fine in wrappers. [#031499] SOLD
[San Francisco], [Four Seasons], 1964. A broadside poem, 9-1/2" x 12-1/2", reproducing Snyder's calligraphy and alluding to Nanao Sakaki, Japanese poet and one of Snyder's mentors, as well as being called "the godfather of Japanese hippies." One of 300 copies sold on the occasion of a reading by Snyder, Lew Welch and Philip Whalen at Longshoreman's Hall in San Francisco on June 12, 1964. McNeil A7. Signed by the author. A fine copy of this early Snyder piece. [#029720] $300
(n.p.), Orphée La Différence, (1992). A bilingual edition (French/English) of poems taken from the volumes Myths & Texts, Regarding Wave and Axe Handles. No comparable U.S. edition. Inscribed by Snyder to Clayton [Eshleman] in 1996. Uncommon: OCLC lists only 4 copies in library holdings. Fine in wrappers. [#030822] $150
(San Francisco), City Lights, (1977). A collection of six essays by Snyder. Signed by Snyder in 1996 and with the 1978 ownership signature of poet Clayton Eshleman. A nice association: the two poets are longtime friends, and earlier that year had given a reading/talk together in Paris, France. Several notes to text in Eshleman's hand, mostly in the first two essays, "The Yogin and the Philosopher" and "The Politics of Ethnopoetics." Mild spine-sunning, else fine in wrappers. [#030817] $150
(NY), New Directions, (1980). The softcover issue of this collection. Inscribed by Snyder to Clayton Eshleman in 1996. With Eshleman's 1989 ownership signature and his extensive notes in the text, giving a clear view of the poet as reader. Fine in wrappers. [#030818] $150
(NY), New Directions, (1974). Second printing. The 1975 winner of the Pulitzer Prize for poetry. Inscribed by Snyder to Clayton Eshleman in 1996. A few of Eshleman's notes in the text. Near fine in wrappers. [#030816] $70
1992, 1996. The first announcement is for a poetry reading by Snyder at Eastern Michigan University (where Clayton Eshleman taught for many years). Includes a brief Snyder bio. One sheet folded to make four pages, then folded again; near fine. The second piece is an invitation (in French) for a reading/lecture (in English) by Snyder and Eshleman in Paris in 1996 at La Librairie a tire-d'ailes. 8-1/4" x 4. Fine. Nice documentation of a small part of the history these two poets have shared. [#031503] $100
1996. May 9, 1996. An aerogramme to Diane di Prima, written from Japan, agreeing to something, with the exception being that she leave off the "respectfully yours." Snyder adds: "the cherry blossoms having departed for the Other Shore, the azalea blossoms send back their answer." He closes: "yours fraternally in the workers & peasants struggle." Folded in fourths for mailing, and mildly edgetorn in opening; very near fine. A wonderful association between two of the most important poets of postwar America. [#017274] $475
(San Francisco), (Four Seasons Foundation), (1963-1964). Three broadsides: Gary Snyder's Nanao Knows, Lew Welch's Step Out Onto the Planet, and Philip Whalen's Three Mornings. [McNeil A7.] Each reproduced by photo-offset from the author's own calligraphy and printed in an edition of 300 copies on the occasion of a reading by the three poets at Longshoreman's Hall, San Francisco, June 12, 1964. Each broadside is signed by its author. Snyder, Welch and Whalen first met when they attended Reed College, a progressive school in Oregon; the friends later became three of the most influential poets of the Beat generation. Don Carpenter, a friend of Richard Brautigan and an important figure in the Bay Area literary scene, organized the Free Way Reading with the three poets; Don Allen, another key figure in the Bay Area literary scene -- his nascent publishing company, the Four Seasons Foundation, would later publish both Snyder and Brautigan -- printed the broadsides to commemorate the reading. An important occasion, linking three key poets of their time. Welch disappeared in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada mountains in 1971; Snyder found a suicide note at his camp, but no body was ever found and his fate remains one of the mysteries of that time. Each broadside is 9-1/2" x 12-1/2", with a mild edge crease in the left margin that would disappear with framing; near fine. A nice set. [#031781] $1,000
Decatur, Wisteria Press, 1999. Poetry. Copy "B" of 26 lettered copies, of a total edition of 297 copies. Signed by the author and by the artist, Barry Moser. With a signed print by Moser laid in. Quarterbound in leather; fine, in handmade clamshell case. [#913725] $275
NY, Harper & Row, (1970). The fourth volume of poetry by this writer whose first, Traveling Through the Dark, won the National Book Award in 1963. In 1970, Stafford became Poetry Consultant to the Library of Congress, a position currently known as Poet Laureate of the U.S. Inscribed by the author. Fine in a very near fine, price-clipped dust jacket with mild sunning to the spine lettering. [#022540] $125
(n.p.), Black Sparrow, 1968. A broadside poem, issued in an edition of 200 signed copies; this, however, is an unreleased issue, preceding the formally published version by one month. A typographical error caused this version to be destroyed; no copies are referred to in the bibliography of the Black Sparrow Press. This is one of the suppressed copies, with the typo. A very early Black Sparrow piece. Very good. [#030056] $35
Pittsburgh, Carnegie Mellon University Press, 1990. A collection of poems by this award-winning poet. Inscribed by the author to another poet and his wife. Fine in wrappers. [#020511] $40
NY, Knopf, 1973. Review copy. This is the hardcover edition. Fine in fine dust jacket and warmly and poetically inscribed by the author in 1974. [#001945] $45
Hartford, Bartholomew's Cobble, (1975). Of a total edition of 250 copies, this is number 25 of 50 numbered copies signed by the author. Additionally, this copy is inscribed by the author in a doodle of "house wrecking" in the year of publication. Some sunning to spine; near fine in wrappers. [#001952] $25
(n.p.), (n.p.), (n.d.). Poetry by a Chippewa author. "Child of Hope," "Tiinowit," "Solemn Spirits," "When the spirit moves you...," "Seven Drummers," "An Old Man Asks," "We Are the Warrior Spirits," "The Wanderers Prayer," "There are warriors weeping in the garden...," and "Come unto me oh my children..." Also "Heal My Land" by Pat Swanson. Corner creasing to "Solemn Spirits," else fine. [#025773] $150
NY, Scribner, (1967). A review copy of the hardcover edition of this collection of poems. Fine in a fine dust jacket, with review slip and promotional material laid in. [#016410] $60
(n.p.), Timberline Press, 2012. A fine press volume of poetry by this poet who is well known for his haiku and is a noted authority on the poet Robert Francis, who was a friend and mentor. Of a total edition of 120 copies, this is one of only 4 copies bound in boards on handmade cotton and linen rag paper. Fine in saddle-stitched boards, with colophon laid in. A beautiful production and a tiny limitation. [#030045] $100
(n.p.), Blue Moon Press, 2011. Copy number 5 of 50 copies, signed by the designer and printer, Jim Lee. A broadside printing Swist's poem, which first appeared in an online edition of Lady Jane's Miscellany. 17" x 11", nicely matted and framed to 22-1/2" x 17". Fine. [#032907] $100
Marvin, Blue Cloud Quarterly, 1981. The second book by this Athabaskan writer, a collection of poems. Published as Vol. 27, No. 1 of Blue Cloud Quarterly. Labeled for mailing; fine in stapled wrappers. [#025774] SOLD
Undated. A handwritten copy of "The Book of Lies" from Tate's collection The Lost Pilot, which was a Yale Younger Poets selection in 1967. Written in ink, with one pencil correction to the text. Inscribed "For Stan Wiater with all best wishes - James Tate 30 August 79." Some offsetting to the paper, indicative of the sheet having been matted and mounted differently than it currently is; near fine, framed. Tate was a Pulitzer Prize- and National Book Award-winning poet, and he and Wiater both lived in western Massachusetts, where they became friends over the years. [#032830] SOLD
Dickinson, Dickinson State College, 1974. Tate served as poetry editor for this annual publication, and here contributes an insightful and amusing three-page introduction. The collection includes, among other things, Stratis Haviaras's first poems in English. Spine-sunned, near fine in wrappers, with the stamp of a previous owner inside the front cover. [#030830] $70
Middletown, Wesleyan University Press, (1976). The simultaneous issue in wrappers. Inscribed by Tate to Stanley Wiater, "with friendship and pleasure at the end of our 3rd? interview - Best wishes, Jim Tate/ Nov 30, 1983." Recipient's stamp inside front cover; near fine in wrappers. [#030399] ON HOLD
$45
(Carmichael), (Chalatien Press), (1976). Poetry by this Wintu writer, apparently his first book. Near fine in stapled wrappers. Inscribed by the author to a Choctaw artist, with an autograph note signed laid in. This is the first edition, not to be confused with the 1981 edition. [#025780] $125
(Santa Barbara), (Unicorn Press), (1968). The second edition of these poems by a Vietnamese Buddhist who was one of the most prominent exponents of Buddhism to the West. Fine in brown wrappers. [#010372] $35
(Memphis), St. Luke's, (1978). Second printing of this collection of poems by a Cherokee writer. Inscribed by the author to Joe [Bruchac] and signed "Marilou/Awiakta." Typed poem with holograph (unsigned) note laid in. Near fine, without dust jacket, apparently as issued, with publisher's information sheet laid in. [#025783] SOLD
(London), (Jonathan Cape), (1999). Poetry. Signed by the author. Fine in self-wrappers. [#916924] $35
Middletown, Wesleyan University Press, (1983). Second printing. Inscribed by the author to another poet in 1987. A fine copy of the issue in wrappers. [#023090] $40
London, Oxford University Press, 1964. Poetry by Tomlinson, Austin Clarke and Tony Connor. Inscribed by Tomlinson. Handmade bookplate of another poet on front flyleaf. Rebound in blue boards; near fine. [#023327] $45
(Seattle), Dragon Gate, (1984). The issue in wrappers of this collection of poems spanning the years 1937-1983. Inscribed by the author to another poet in the year of publication. With the recipient's ownership signature. Fine, with the "1984 Winner Western States Book Award" label on the front cover. [#022812] $70
Cambridge, Leavitt & Peirce, 1958. The hardcover issue of this very early appearance in print by Updike. Harvard alumni commemorate the 75th anniversary of a tobacco store and gathering place; Updike contributes a poem, "The Old Tobacconist." Slight foxing to top edge, else fine in a near fine, orginal glassine dustwrapper. [#030276] $650
NY, Knopf, (1965). A book of poems, one for each month. This is the third of Updike's books for children done in the Sixties, this being the trade binding (there was also a library binding done). Illustrated by Nancy Ekholm Burkert. Fine in a near fine, price-clipped dust jacket. [#912070] $175
NY, Knopf, (1965). A book of poems, one for each month. This is the third of Updike's books for children done in the Sixties, this being the library binding in pictorial boards (there was also a trade binding done). Illustrated by Nancy Ekholm Burkert. This is a fine copy in pictorial boards with just a small push near the upper spine. Difficult to find in collectable condition in the library binding. [#030407] $250
(Stevenson), (Country Squire), (1968). A single poem, and his first book to be issued as a limited edition. Copy number 43 of 125 numbered copies signed by the author. The slightest hint of edge sunning; else fine in saddle-stitched cardstock covers. [#031520] $450
NY, Knopf, 1993. A selection from his previously published work, and over 70 poems never collected before. Inscribed by the author with "best wishes." Slight spine push, else fine in a very near fine dust jacket with a vertical spine crease. [#030238] $125
(NY), (New York Quarterly), (1973). An issue of the magazine, printing Updike's poem for the first time and made into a limited edition by means of a rubber-stamp. Of a total edition of 483 copies, this is copy number 334 of 457 numbered copies signed by Updike at his contribution. Fine in wrappers. [#030279] $70
NY, Knopf, 1985. A collection of poetry. Signed by the author. Slight foxing, near fine in a fine dust jacket. [#030207] $100
(Cleveland), Bits Press, (1980). Of a total edition of 185 copies, this is one of 135 numbered copies signed by the author (copy #184). Additionally inscribed by Updike: "For Sylvia & Cyril/ a not strictly appropriate but nevertheless heartfelt token of esteem and appreciation of hospitality received on July 6, 1981/ John." Some staining to foredge of cover, a bit of foxing to foredge of text block; near fine in saddle-stitched wrappers. [#029420] $375
London, Gollancz, 1959. The first British edition of his first book, a collection of poems, published in the U.S. as The Carpentered Hen the previous year. Fine in a dust jacket with a small, nearly imperceptible abrasion to the rear panel, else fine. [#912062] $100
(n.p.), (Ewert), (1997). A poem by Updike from A Child's Calendar, here issued as a holiday card. Printed in an edition of 150 copies, this is one of 100 copies issued unsigned, but this copy has been inscribed by the author: "A small item for [your] enormous collection. Sent to both of you with my warm regards of the season. Cheers, John." Fine. [#030255] $200
Northridge, Lord John, 1984. A limited edition collecting of early works by Updike from his undergraduate years, including poems and several cartoons. Of a total edition of 200, this is copy number 23 of 150 numbered copies, signed by the author. Slight foxing to edges of text block; else fine, without dust jacket, as issued. [#030204] $275
NY, Knopf, 1969. A collection of poems, and the first of his full-length books published by Knopf to be issued in a limited edition. Copy number 307 of 350 copies signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket and slipcase. [#030167] $125
Northridge, Lord John Press, 1990. A miniature book of poems. Of a total edition of 226 copies, this is copy 39 of 200 numbered copies signed by the author. 3" x 2-3/8". Fine. [#030226] $450
Cleveland, Bits Press, (1988). A limited edition of six poems, one of which, "Munich," has its first appearance here. One of 120 unnumbered copies signed by the author. Fine in saddle-stitched wrappers. Uncommon. [#030219] $200
NY, Bradbury Press, 1985. A collection of more than 100 poems, selected by Paul B. Janeczko, and published in a pocket sized book with glossy flexible pictorial covers. Updike's contribution is "The Grief of Cafeterias" and it contains two typographical errors, which have been corrected in red copyeditor's pencil, in copyeditor's style. Slight foxing to the edges of the text block, else fine. [#030862] $100
(n.p.), Albondocani, (1974). A card with a poem by Updike, used as a holiday greeting. One of 75 copies of the suppressed first issue, with the front cover drawing printed upside down. Fine in stapled wrappers. Uncommon. [#011637] $200
(n.p.), Albondocani, (1974). A card with a poem by Updike, used as a holiday greeting. One of 400 copies, of which this is one of 240 without the publisher's name printed on the page with the greeting. This copy is inscribed by Updike. One spot of foxing to foredge; else fine in stapled wrappers. With original (though foxed) mailing envelope. [#028080] $125
(n.p.), (William B. Ewert), (1998). The first separate edition of this poem, issued as a holiday card. Of a total edition of 185 copies, this is one of 130 copies issued unsigned, but this copy has been signed by Updike and dated 1988 and additionally inscribed by Updike in three different colored pens: "Merry Christmas/ a card to warm yourselves by/ Cheers, John." Fine, in hand-addressed envelope, apparently meant to be hand-delivered as Updike has added, "Sorry to miss you - Happy Holidays!/ John." [#030257] $250
Helsinki, Eurographica, (1990). Copy number 321 of 350 copies signed by the author and dated 1990. Faint edge foxing, else fine in wrappers and dust jacket. [#030231] $150
(n.p.), William B. Ewert, 1999. The first separate appearance of a poem that first appeared in The New Republic. Two issues produced: 65 signed copies printed as broadsides and 130 unsigned copies issued folded, as cards. This is one of the latter but has been inscribed by the author to two, married friends: "___ - An item for your collection./ ___ - whatever happened to our golf foursome?/ Happy Holidays to you both./ John." 8-3/4" x 11-1/2". Folded, by design; fine. [#030264] $250
NY, Knopf, 1963. His second collection of poems. Inscribed by the author. Spotting to top stain; near fine in a very good dust jacket. [#030156] $225
NY, Harper & Brothers, (1958). His first book, a collection of poems, published in an edition of 2000 copies. Inscribed by the author in 1990: "For ___ ___/ warm regards to a great collector/ John Updike." The recipient was a neighbor of Updike, in addition to being a collector of his books. Trace foxing to edge of text block, else fine in a fine, price-clipped, first issue dust jacket, which ends with "two children" on the rear flap. A beautiful copy of a book that is known for its binding coming loose. With a custom three quarter leather clamshell case from the Praxis Bindery. [#030844] $2,000
[NY], (Scientific American), (1969). The first separate edition of this physics-themed poem. One of 6200 copies printed as Christmas cards to be issued with W.H. Auden's A New Year Greeting (not present). 24 pages, illustrated. Fine in stapled wrappers. Lacking the cardboard sleeve that combined the two booklets, but in a custom three quarter leather clamshell case from the Praxis Bindery. This copy is inscribed by the author: "For ___/ Merry Christmas 1995/ John Updike [with a drawing of holly leaves and berries]." While the print run of this item was not particularly small, especially when compared with the many limited editions Updike has done, the nature of its distribution -- as a freebie to Scientific American subscribers -- suggests that most copies would have been lost or discarded. [#030850] $2,500
(Boston), G.K. Hall and Marquis Who's Who, Inc., (1978). A poem by Updike, published as a holiday greeting card. Signed by the author. Fine, with original (unused) mailing envelope. Together with a presumed proof copy, with the copyright notice handwritten (in an unknown hand) rather than printed on the rear cover. Also fine. Both housed together in a G.K. Hall envelope. A scarce ephemeral piece, especially uncommon signed, and notably rare in the variant with the handwritten copyright notice. [#031524] $1,500
NY, Knopf, (1995). An alphabet book, with poems by John Updike and photographs by his son, David. Signed by John Updike. Quarto; fine in a fine dust jacket. [#912124] $300
NY, Literal Latte, 1994. Updike contributes the poem "Money"; Maso contributes "In the Changing Room" to the first issue of this free NYC journal. Newsprint slightly tanned; near fine. "Money" was not collected until Updike's Americana in 2001. [#030424] SOLD
Concord, Ewert, 1995. A poem by Updike with wood engravings by Barry Moser. Of a total edition of 150 copies, this is one of 50 unnumbered copies printed on Rives lightweight paper and handcased in boards. Signed by both Updike and Moser. Fine, without dust jacket, as issued. Uncommon in the hardcover issue. [#030252] $650
(Madison), Sixties House, 1962. Twenty poems by the Peruvian poet, chosen and translated by John Knoepfle, James Wright and Robert Bly, with introductory remarks about Vallejo by Knoepfle and Wright. From the library of poet Barbara Howes, with a couple of her pencilled marginal marks; near fine in wrappers and very good, sunned dust jacket with tears at the spine extremities. [#018778] $70
(St. Paul), Graywolf Press, (1992). Poetry by the Chilean poet and artist; inscribed to a Native American poet. A few erasures in margins; still fine in wrappers. [#025792] $45
Ithaca, Cornell, 1965. Vliet contributes two poems, "Wild Asparagus" and "The Crickets in Their Antique Real World." Darkening to covers, lower corner crease; very good in stapled wrappers. [#029229] $45
(n.p.), (Self-published), 2005. Seventeen poems, photocopied and velobound. Self-published by Vonnegut and given to friends. With his photocopied signature and the date, 5/26/05. Fine. These poems were published, individually and in pairs, in issues of the Cornell Daily Sun beginning in October, 2005. They have not been published or collected elsewhere, other than this production Vonnegut himself did. Scarce. [#029027] SOLD
(Brooklyn), Hanging Loose Press, (1985). Poems and short prose. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#914353] $40
Garden City, Doubleday, 1966. Her first collection of poems to be published by a mainstream trade publisher. Signed by the author with a small drawing on the title page. Rear hinge starting; near fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#000346] $45
On Sale: $23
NY, Farrar Straus Giroux, (1979). Poetry by the Caribbean Nobel Prize winner. Inscribed by the author to Peter [Matthiessen] and his wife. Near fine in wrappers. [#032537] $400
NY, Dial, (1978). The uncorrected proof copy of her third poetry collection, and the book preceding her Pulitzer Prize- and National Book Award-winning novel The Color Purple. Cardstock covers bound with a black tape spine, a format that suggests few were created. Slightly dusty with a small rear corner crease; else fine. [#020063] $750
Boise, Ahsahta Press, (1976). Poetry, only issued in wrappers. Powerful and in many cases grim poems, largely dealing with reservation life in the West in the volatile decade of the 1970s. A couple marks to rear cover and fading to spine; near fine. An important book that has been called "a poetic precursor to Louise Erdrich's novel, Love Medicine," the book is back in print now 30 years after its original publication. The first edition is scarce. [#025806] SOLD
Barre, Barre Publishers, 1972. "Poems in Wood." Woodcuts by Wang of poems by people he knew personally, including Charles Simic, Robert Bly, William Stafford, James Tate, David Ignatow, Robert Francis, and others. Inscribed by Wang: "For P & O. Hope that they will enjoy this book as I carved it." Minor sunning and handling to covers; near fine in wrappers. [#032834] $100
Cardiff/Dunedin, Second Aeon/Caveman, 1973. The dedication copy of this collection of poems, inscribed by Wantling to fellow poet Walter Lowenfels in January, 1974: "For Walter, like it is p. 9...Love, Bill." The printed dedication, on page 9, reads, "Hang on in Walter Lowenfels. What are we gonna do when you're gone? How we gonna handle that mess?" (Ironically Wantling died several months later, at age 40; Lowenfels died in 1976 at age 89.) Wantling spent five years in San Quentin for forgery and possession of narcotics before graduating from and then teaching at Illinois State University. Faint foxing to rear cover; near fine in wrappers. [#032918] $250
New York, Lorenz Gude & Ted Berrigan, 1963. The fourth issue of this mimeographed poetry journal, this issue being devoted to the work of poet Edwin Denby, with contributions by him as well as pieces about his work by Berrigan, Frank O'Hara and John Wieners. It is most famous at this point for the cover, which "was designed by Andy Warhol from photographs of poets Edwin Denby and Gerard Malanga." Warhol took a number of Polaroid photographs of Denby and Malanga and then created a silk screen from them for the covers. The clarity and resolution of the images vary from copy to copy of the production, either as a result of the screen getting clogged by re-use or as a result of deliberate manipulation by Warhol; in this copy, the images on the front are clearly two individuals but the resolution is limited and the image presents almost as an abstraction; the rear cover, which is a shot of the two poets kissing, is in this copy virtually entirely abstract. An early and important Warhol production: this is the first known instance of Warhol using Polaroid photographs for making silkscreen images, a practice he came back to later and became his standard approach for portraits. Some edge wear to the covers and the spine, and a tear at the base of the spine; overall very good in stapled wrappers. [#032338] $6,500
NY, Harper & Row, (1976). A review copy of the revised and expanded edition of the first book by this author of Blackfoot-Gros Ventre heritage, who was one of the most important and accomplished Native American writers of the post-1968 generation. Welch was a respected poet and an award-winning novelist, and wrote, with great power and sensitivity, fiction focused on both contemporary Indian life (e.g., Winter in the Blood) and historical material (the award-winning Fools Crow). The sixth book in Harper & Row's Native American Publishing Program. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#025810] $100
NY, World, (1971). The first book by this author of Blackfoot-Gros Ventre heritage, who was one of the most important and accomplished Native American writers of the post-1968 generation. Welch was a respected poet and an award-winning novelist, and wrote, with great power and sensitivity, fiction focused on both contemporary Indian life (e.g., Winter in the Blood) and historical material (the award-winning Fools Crow). Riding the Earthboy 40, a collection of poems, was never properly distributed as the publisher folded at the time of publication. It was re-published five years later in a revised and expanded form by Harper & Row. This is the first edition. Inscribed by the author to poets Sandra McPherson and Henry Carlile "with best wishes and hopes for another fishing trip soon. Love, Jim." Carlile's ownership signature and stamp; a fine copy in a very near fine dust jacket with slight wear at the spine extremities. A nice association copy. [#025809] $325
London, Chatto & Windus, 1931. Nathanael West's copy of Huxley's collection of poetry, with West's holograph notes on five of the front and rear endpages. Approximately 250 words, mostly quotes of other writers -- Huxley, Gray, Shakespeare; some light, but most quite serious: "In matters of love it is absurd to stand on your dignity and claim your rights. Such experiences cannot be judged and calculated like a matter of business. One gives as much and as long as one can & one does not bargain. Take what is given to you." West concludes with: "The paths of glory lead but to the grave." The year this book was published, West published his first novel. Later in the 1930s, both West and Huxley were employed as Hollywood screenwriters. West died in 1940 at the age of 37. The provenance of this book leads from West to his brother-in-law, S.J. Perelman, to the writer and bookseller, George Sims, who recounts the circumstances of his purchasing books from Perelman in the early 1970s, presumably including this one. A photocopy of a note from Sims is laid in. Fading to spine, spotting to cloth, short tear to lower front joint; still very good, without dust jacket. Publisher's extra spine label tipped to rear free endpaper. A wonderful glimpse of West's musings and inner life. [#017974] $3,500
(n.p.), Apparently Self-Published, (1978). Poetry. Rust to the staples, otherwise near fine in stapled wrappers. Stapled to the front cover is a typed letter signed to Peter Matthiessen. [#032237] $70
[San Francisco], [Auerhahn Press], 1964. A broadside poem. One of 125 copies. 8-1/2" x 12", fine. [#019387] $70
(San Francisco), [Four Seasons Foundation], 1963/(1964). A broadside poem reproduced by photo-offset from the author's own calligraphy and printed in an edition of 300 copies on the occasion of a reading by Whalen, Gary Snyder and Lew Welch at Longshoreman's Hall, San Francisco, June 12, 1964. Signed by the author. 9-1/2" x 12-1/2". Faint edge sunning; else fine. [#029744] $150
NY, Harper & Row, (1981). The uncorrected proof copy of a compilation of pieces, many of them never collected before. Dampstaining to rear cover and the margins of the last few pages. Very good in wrappers. [#013881] $45
NY, Harper & Row, (1981). The uncorrected proof of this compilation of pieces, many of them never collected before. White was a longtime writer for The New Yorker, and his intelligent, humane and understated essays helped define that magazine's literary style over more than three decades, setting it apart from the other mass-circulation journals of its time. Fine in wrappers. [#016069] $70
NY, Harcourt Brace World, (1961). Inscribed by Wilbur to the poet John Holmes and his wife Doris in the year of publication: "To John and Doris/ aff'y/ Dick." Holmes's attractive woodcut bookplate front pastedown; near fine in a very good, edgeworn dust jacket with rubbing to the spine folds. Someone, presumably Holmes, has underlined a few lines in the poem "The Undead." A nice association copy. [#020967] $250
NY, Alicat Bookshop Press, 1948. Alicat Chapbooks No. XII. Willeford's first book, a collection of poems, preceded only by a group of poems in broadside format, issued as part of another Alicat Press collection. These poems contain the only descriptions Willeford ever committed to writing of his experience in World War II, which, by the evidence included here and by comments he made to others about them, were apparently horrific. Acidic paper browning with age and some wear to spine; otherwise near fine in stapled wrappers. [#006648] $150
NY, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, (1992). A poetry collection that was nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Inscribed by the author in 1996. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#022600] $55
NY, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, (1988). A collection of poems published the year after he won the National Book Critics Circle Award for poetry, for Flesh and Blood. Williams also won the 2000 Pulitzer Prize for poetry. Inscribed by the author in 1996. Upper corners tapped; else fine in a near fine dust jacket with a tiny corner chip. [#022598] SOLD
(Norfolk), New Directions, (1956). A collection of poems by the author of A Streetcar Named Desire, The Glass Menagerie, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof and other modern classics of the theater. Fine in a very good, price-clipped dust jacket with a bit of sunning and a couple of small edge chips. [#016431] $125
NY, Hargail Music Press, (1947). Sheet music by Bowles for this Tennessee Williams poem. The two collaborated a number of times during the period prior to Bowles's first novel, The Sheltering Sky (1949), when his primary creative work was as a composer. Miller E40, approximately 1000 copies printed. Broadsheet, folded to make four pages. 9-1/8" x 12-1/8". Tiny corner chips and minor marginal dampstaining; very good. Scarce in the original, although apparently collected in the 1984 Soundings Press edition of Bowles' Selected Songs. [#017988] $375
NY, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, (1977). Poetry by the author of Beyond the Bedroom Wall and What I'm Going to Do, I Think, among others. Inscribed by the author on the day of publication. Fine in a near fine, mildly edge-sunned dust jacket. [#020972] $45
NY, Farrar Straus Giroux, (1977). A collection of poetry. Inscribed by the author to Peter [Matthiessen] in 1980, "mas y mas," and signed "L." Near fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#032546] $150
(Honolulu), Bamboo Ridge Press, 1993. A poetry collection, published as a special double issue of Bamboo Ridge. Fine in wrappers. [#914378] $40
San Francisco, Harper, (1980). His first full-length collection of poems and the tenth book in Harper's Native American Publishing Program. Inscribed by the author to Joseph Bruchac. Very near fine in a near fine dust jacket with shelf wear at the corners and spine ends. [#025834] $100
Detroit, Artists' Workshop, 1965. Antiwar poetry inspired by a newspaper story about a GI, decorated for valor, who asked a correspondent to write about his dead buddies. The poem is written in the voices of his sixteen dead comrades. The newspaper articles inspiring it are reprinted on the covers, which were designed by John Sinclair, later a noted figure in the antiwar movement and the counterculture. Acidic pages heavily browned; covers splitting at spine. A good copy only of a scarce and fragile item: originally done in an edition of 500, few seem to have survived. [#028719] SOLD
(Madison), University of Wisconsin Press, (1988). Winner of the 1988 Brittingham Prize in Poetry. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#914397] $30
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New Arrivals Catalog 168