E-list # 138

Poetry

NY, Knopf, 1975. Inscribed by the author in 1977 to another poet, "who has befriended Hazard and his grateful friend the author." Recipient's handmade bookplate front flyleaf; a near fine copy, with the main dust jacket sections clipped and attached to the boards. A nice literary association copy. [#023011] $60
NY, Atheneum, 1983. Third printing. Signed by the author. With the handmade bookplate of another poet on the flyleaf. Fine in wrappers. [#022760] SOLD
NY, Harlem Friendship House News, [c. 1941-1948]. A broadside poem by "Tom Merton." Published by the Friendship House, a missionary movement dedicated to interracial justice where Merton volunteered for two weeks in 1941 before journeying to the Abbey of Gethsemani. The Friendship House News became the Catholic Interracialist in 1949, hence the above date range. Fragile and edge-chipped, not affecting text. "Holy Communion" was collected in In the Dark Before Dawn: New Selected Poems of Thomas Merton in 2005, but it is not mentioned at all in Dell'Isola's Thomas Merton: A Bibliography, which was published seven years after Merton's death. We have never seen another copy. OCLC lists only one copy, at SUNY Buffalo, albeit with an incorrect estimated date. Rare. [#030125] SOLD
NY, Knopf, 1998. The uncorrected proof copy of this narrative in the form of a single long poem. Fine in wrappers. [#012373] $30
NY, Atheneum, 1977. Later printing of this collection of poems. Inscribed by the author to Peter [Matthiessen] and his wife, longtime friends of Merwin, and signed "Bill." An excellent association copy. Near fine in wrappers. [#032501] $200
Iowa City, Cummington Press, 1961. The author's first regularly published collection, the Lamont Poetry selection for 1960. Attractively printed and bound in an edition of 2500 copies. Fine in a very good, spine- and edge-tanned dust jacket. [#004761] SOLD
(Toronto), McClelland & Stewart, (1991). Poetry. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#915359] $70
(Toronto), McClelland & Stewart, (1999). Poetry. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. Together with a program and ticket for the 20th Annual International Festival of Authors, at which Michaels read. [#915370] $30
Toronto, Coach House Press, (1985). The first book, a poetry collection, by the author of the highly acclaimed novel Fugitive Pieces. Fine in wrappers. [#915358] $175
(Toronto), McClelland & Stewart, (1997). A review copy of the first combined edition of her first two books of poetry. Signed by the author. Stamped as a review copy on the title page. Fine in wrappers. [#915368] $40
NY, Harper & Brothers, 1928. The first trade edition of this collection of poems. Millay was the first woman to win the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, for her collection The Harp-Weaver, in 1924. Fine in a near fine, spine-tanned dust jacket internally tape-strengthened at the crown. An especially crisp, clean copy of this title. [#022062] SOLD
(Paris), (Point du Jour), (1949). Poetry by the French photographer, with an introduction by Miller. One of 2061 numbered copies. Pages uncut; fine in wrappers. [#017215] $150
Paris, Grasset, 1956. Rilke's poetry, inscribed to Doris Dana, Gabriela Mistral's longtime companion and translator, from Marie-Lise Gazarian-Gautier: "A mon amie Doris de la Nina Azul/ avril 1960." "La Nina Azul," Gazarian-Gautier, was a biographer and protege of Mistral. Together with a second printing of the paperback edition of Selected Poems of Gabriela Mistral, which Dana translated. Gabriela Mistral was the first Latin American writer to win the Nobel Prize for Literature, and only the fifth woman to receive the prize. The pages of the Rilke are uncut and age-toned; else both books are fine in wrappers. An interesting association copy between two of the women closest to the Nobel Prize winner Mistral. [#032895] $250
NY, St. Martin's, 1992. The uncorrected proof copy of this collection of stories and poems from 1961 to 1991. An earlier limited edition by Rydal Press printed a portion of this collection. Signed by the author. Publicist's card stapled inside the front cover; fine in wrappers. [#025624] $175
(Willimantic), Curbstone Press, (1995). Poetry, translated by Victor Perera. The poems express the traditional values of Mayan culture and reveal the Guatemalan government's attempt to destroy the indigenous people. Montejo fled from Guatemala when his brother was killed by soldiers and his own name appeared on a death squad list. Only issued in wrappers. Fine, and signed by the author. [#016761] $40
NY, Grove Press, (2001). The author's second collection of poems. Warmly inscribed by the author to another writer ("her favorite dinner date") in the year of publication. Fine in wrappers. [#019701] $70
[Las Vegas], [Rainmaker Editions], [2002]. Proof sheets, consisting of two frameable leaves, from the limited edition of this collection of five poems by Morrison with illustrations by Kara Walker. Two leaves only: the first carries the third stanza of "Eve Remembering" and is blank on the verso; the second features Walker's art work, with the title page of "The Perfect Ease of Grain" on the verso. "Proof" in pencil in bottom margin. Slight corner crease to the leaf with text; else fine. A notable collaboration between two of the most highly regarded African-American women in their respective arts -- Morrison a Nobel Prize winner in Literature and Walker a visual artist using the silhouette as a form, who was the youngest recipient ever of a MacArthur grant when she received one in 1997 at the age of 28; she was selected by Time magazine in 2007 as one of the 100 most influential figures of our time. The original silhouette for one of the images in this collaboration with Morrison sold at auction for over $30,000. The edition for which this is a proof sheet was limited to 425 copies; it seems safe to assume that far fewer proofs were done -- probably a tiny handful. [#029264] $750
NY, Reynal & Hitchcock, (1946). The author's first book, a collection of poems. This copy is marked "File Copy" on the flyleaf, title page and top page edges. Very good in a fair dust jacket with one long, internally-repaired edge tear. [#004773] $35
Merrick, Cross-Cultural, 1982. Inscribed by the translator Claire Nicolas White to Peter [Matthiessen] and his wife. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#032122] $60
(Native American Periodical)
(Marvin), (Blue Cloud Quarterly), (1982). Vol. 28, No. 4. Poetry by Earle Thompson, Sylvester Brito, Diane Burns and others. Mailing address of Joseph Bruchac. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#025646] SOLD
(Native American Periodical)
(Marvin), (Blue Cloud Quarterly), (1981). Vol. 27, No. 4. The tenth anniversary poetry issue, with work by Maurice Kenny, Jack Forbes, and others. The issue is dedicated to Maurice Kenny. Mailing address of Joseph Bruchac. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#025643] SOLD
Boston, Atlantic/Little Brown, (1954). A novel. One corner bumped; else near fine in a very good, rubbed dust jacket. [#001765] $25
NY, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, (1972). The uncorrected proof copy of this long poem based on the life and death of a Chilean highwayman in California in the 1850s. Bilingual edition. Near fine in tall wrappers, with a near fine copy of the dust jacket. [#019261] $125
NY, Strawberry Press, (1981). Pamphlet collection of poetry, with a cover illustration by Kahionhes and published by a press partly owned and operated by poet Maurice Kenny. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#025655] $30
(Greenfield), (Greenfield Review), (1973). A collection of poems. Slight spine-sunning; else fine in stapled wrappers. Cover illustration by Wendy Rose. An early book by one of the more important Native American poets to come to prominence in the renaissance of American Indian literature that took place in the Seventies. [#002557] $100
(Greenfield), (Greenfield Review), (1973). The second issue of this collection of poems. Cover illustration by Wendy Rose. An early book by one of the more important Native American poets to come to prominence in the renaissance of American Indian literature that took place in the Seventies. Signed by the author in 1973. Minor rubbing and creasing; near fine in stapled wrappers. [#025650] $150
NY, Strawberry Press, (1983). Poetry by a writer of the Concow Maidu tribe, of California. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#025665] $40
NY, Stonehill Publishing, (1976). Swampy Cree Indian narrative poems, translated by Norman, with a preface by poet and translator Jerome Rothenberg, founder of Alcheringa. Winner of the Harold Morton Landon Translation Award from the Academy of American Poets. This is the hardcover issue; there was a simultaneous issue in wrappers. This is also Norman's first book from a regular trade publisher, rather than a small press; two of his later books of fiction were nominated for the National Book Award. Faint spot to top edge and faint sticker removal on front panel of jacket; else fine in a fine, price-clipped dust jacket. [#016779] $200
Santa Barbara, Ross-Erikson, (1982). First thus, second edition, but first expanded edition of this collection of Swampy Cree Indian narrative poems, translated by Norman, with a preface by poet and translator Jerome Rothenberg, founder of Alcheringa. Signed by both Norman and Rothenberg. Winner of the Harold Morton Landon Translation Award from the Academy of American Poets. This expanded edition includes Norman's Who Met the Lynx and Why Owls Die with Wings Outspread. Near fine in rubbed wrappers. [#023562] $100
London, Jonathan Cape, (1992). Poetry. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#914249] $100
1969. The photocopied typescript of four poems by Ondaatje that would be collected four years later in Rat Jelly. Given by Ondaatje to Greg Gatenby (later the director of Toronto's annual International Festival of Authors) in 1969 when Gatenby was Ondaatje's student. Includes "Rat Jelly," "Burning Hills" (2 pages), "Near Elginburg," and "Sullivan and the Iguana." All correspond to the versions published in 1973 except for one extra line in this earlier version of "Sullivan and the Iguana." One tiny hand-correction reproduced in "Burning Hills." Pages are folded once; some spotting to pages, mostly on versos, not affecting text. Near fine. Manuscript material from this early in Ondaatje's career is practically unknown in the market, and this group comes with impeccable provenance, only one step removed from the author. [#029953] $1,500
Toronto, Contact Press, (1966). Ondaatje's first book appearance: fourteen poems in this anthology of Canadian poetry edited by Raymond Souster. Issued in wrappers in an edition of 736 copies. Signed by Ondaatje and Souster. Quarto. Acidic pages darkening; near fine. [#911838] $175
(Toronto), McClelland and Stewart, (1967). Ondaatje's copy of this paperback anthology. Signed: "Michael and Kim Ondaatje/ London, August '67." Laid in is a manuscript fragment in Ondaatje's hand (likely used as a bookmark), which reads: "cf. [compare] [Robert] Frost and [Archibald] Lampman as Nature Poets -- show (in [words torn here] etc, Woodcutter's Hut [a Lampman poem]." The anthology is spine-sunned; near fine in wrappers. The fragment is edge-sunned and unevenly torn, about four square inches. An early (legible) Ondaatje signature, from the same year The Dainty Monsters, his first book, was published. [#027699] $200
(London), Picador/Pan, (1989). The first publication of this collection, printing poems from three of his earlier books. Only issued in wrappers. Age-toning to page edges, small corner crease front cover; near fine. [#028505] $40
(Toronto), (Coach House), (1967). His first book, a volume of poetry. One of 500 numbered copies. This copy is inscribed by Ondaatje, "with best wishes," in 1968. Ripple to rear pastedown, else fine in a very near fine dust jacket with just a bit of creasing to the upper edge. [#911106] $1,000
(Toronto), (Coach House), (1969). The hardcover issue. Nicely inscribed by the author "with best wishes & love" in 1970. One of 300 numbered copies of the true first edition of this very uncommon title. Fine in a dust jacket with a touch of foxing, else fine. [#911107] $2,500
(Toronto), (Coach House), (1969). An early collection of poetry, limited to 300 numbered copies, of which this is one of the first 50 copies, which were signed by the author. Lower rear corner lightly tapped, otherwise fine in a fine dust jacket. [#911239] $2,000
(Toronto), House of Anansi Press, (2005). The first trade edition. A poem from Ondaatje's collection Handwriting. Signed by Ondaatje. Fine, with a vertical wraparound band on the rear cover. [#911868] $100
(n.p.), McClelland & Stewart, 1988. A broadside poem from Ondaatje's collection Handwriting. 9-1/2" x 13". One of an unknown number of copies issued by the press in conjunction with the publication of that collection. Signed by the author. Shallow lower corner crease and tiny edge tear; near fine. A broadside with the same poem, but with textual variations, was issued by Fox Run Press in 2004. [#911848] $325
Indianapolis, Bobbs-Merrill, (1969). Review copy. Inscribed by the author in 1970. Fine in a mildly edge- and spine-tanned, else fine dust jacket. [#001776] $45
Santa Barbara, Black Sparrow, 1985. Inscribed by Oppenheimer to another poet in the year of publication. This is the simultaneous issue in wrappers. Dusty; else fine. A nice association copy. [#011992] $125
NY, #Magazine, 1981. Oppenhemier's poetry comprises the entire unnumbered special issue of #Magazine. This copy is inscribed by Oppenheimer to Edward Hoagland: "For Ted/ also progressing/ Joel." A nice association copy: Oppenheminer and Hoagland were friends in the 1960s when they both lived in NY and wrote for The Village Voice, among their other pursuits. Mild edge sunning; else fine in stapled wrappers. [#026364] $100
Indianapolis, Bobbs-Merrill, (1975). Uncorrected proof copy. Inscribed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#005414] SOLD
Berkeley, Turtle Island, 1977. Poems, with artwork by Native American artist Aaron Yava. This is one of 1900 copies in wrappers, not to be confused with the edition that came out in 1984. Signed by the author. Erasure front flyleaf; near fine. [#025675] $125
Tucson, Sun Tracks/U. of Arizona, (1984). Poems, with artwork by Native American artist Aaron Yava. This is the reissue of this collection of poems first published in 1977 by Turtle Island. Signed by Ortiz and with the ownership signature of another Native American poet. Fine in wrappers. [#025676] SOLD
(Las Lomas), (Institute for Native American Development), (1980). A collection of poetry and prose pieces dedicated to the notion of workers' resistance to capitalist exploitation. Issued as INAD Literary Journal Vol. 1, No. 1. Warmly inscribed by the author to Joe [Bruchac] and his family and signed "Simon, brother & friend." Fine in wrappers. [#025679] SOLD
Oak Park, Thunder's Mouth Press, (1981). A powerful collection of poems, which many consider his best book to date and which one prominent poet and critic was quoted as saying should have won the Pulitzer Prize if the judges had had any courage. The title alludes to an infamous massacre of unarmed Cheyenne and Arapaho men, women and children in 1864, and the poems address moral, spiritual, and political issues -- in particular, the process of victimization and the possibility of finding some kind of redemption -- with urgency, clarity and poetic grace. This is the simultaneous issue in wrappers. Warmly inscribed by the author to Joe [Bruchac] in the year of publication. Fine. [#025685] $100
Oak Park, Thunder's Mouth Press, (1981). A powerful collection of poems, which many consider his best book to date and which one prominent poet and critic was quoted as saying should have won the Pulitzer Prize if the judges had had any courage. The title alludes to an infamous massacre of unarmed Cheyenne and Arapaho men, women and children in 1864, and the poems address moral, spiritual, and political issues -- in particular, the process of victimization and the possibility of finding some kind of redemption -- with urgency, clarity and poetic grace. This is the simultaneous issue in wrappers. Inscribed by the author and with the ownership signature of another Native American poet. Near fine in wrappers. [#025686] $80
Cambridge, Candlewick Press, (2003). The uncorrected proof copy of this collection of stories and poems by young American Indians, ages 11-22. Introduced by Ortiz. Near fine in wrappers. [#025689] $30
Tucson, University of Arizona Press, (1992). Collects three of his earlier, out-of-print volumes of poetry -- Going for the Rain, A Good Journey, and Fight Back -- adding a lengthy (30+ pages) introduction in which Ortiz reflects on language, writing, and the specific considerations of being a Native American writer. This is the simultaneous issue in wrappers. Inscribed by the author to Joseph [Bruchac] in 1993. Fine. [#025687] $100
(Anthology)
(Tsaile), Navajo Community College Press, (1983). Edited by and signed by Simon Ortiz. A collection of short fiction by Native American writers, including Silko, Louise Erdrich (preceding her first book of poetry or fiction), Hogan, Bruchac, Cook-Lynn, Paula Gunn Allen, Mary TallMountain, Robert Conley, and many others. This is the scarce hardcover issue: small spot to lower edge; else fine in a mildly rubbed dust jacket. [#025237] $125
Penobscot, Granite Press, (1985). A collection of poetry. This is the trade paperback edition, following a limited edition of 125 hardcover copies. Inscribed by the author in 1989 "on a happy occasion." Fine in wrappers. [#022126] $60
NY, Random House, (1936). His first book, a collection of poems published in an edition of 2000 copies. Ownership signature of poet Ronald T. Johnson. Spine faded; near fine, lacking the dust jacket but with the flap text laid in. [#019275] $70
(NY), (Padell), (1948). His sixth book, and the first to introduce his poems-in-drawings technique, a unique approach to linking his poetry and artwork. This is the second edition. One of 2500 copies. The contents are the same as the first edition, with the exception of a three page poem reproducing Patchen's holograph which did not appear in the earlier edition. Spot to top stain; else fine in a very good dust jacket with several short tears. [#019279] $70
(NY), (Padell), (1948). The reissue. First thus, with material not included in the first edition. Near fine in near fine, price-clipped dust jacket. [#001790] $70
Norfolk, New Directions, (1939). His second book (Morgan A2), printed in an edition of 800 copies. Spine and edge-sunned cloth; near fine, lacking the dust jacket. [#019276] $60
NY, New Directions, (1949). Near fine in a good, surface-soiled dust jacket with a couple long, internally tape-repaired edge tears and a small chip in the front panel. [#019288] $30
London, Cape, (1968). First edition of this collection, with poems selected for this volume by Nathaniel Tarn and a short preface by him. Crown crimped, top edge foxed; near fine in near fine dust jacket. [#001816] $45
NY, Harriss & Givens, (1942). First edition of his fourth book, the regular issue (there was also a painted issue, limited to 75 copies). Printed in an edition of 775 copies. This copy is inscribed by the author. Spine slightly darkened; near fine, lacking the dust jacket. [#001792] $250
(NY), (Ganis & Harris), (1948). The second edition of his fourth book, first published in 1942. Fine in a very good dust jacket rubbed at the corners and folds. [#019287] $45
Prairie City, Decker Press, (1948). An unrecorded variant of this uncommon title. Gray cloth with the same design as that of the apparently first issue yellow cloth, in a blue dust jacket with gold and black lettering, a price of $1 and the words "THE ARCHIVE of Duke University" in place of "Louis Untermeyer" on the dust jacket copy. According to Morgan, Decker printed about 200 copies of this title, about 20 of which were the first issue, although Morgan doesn't account for all known variants. Shortly after printing this book, Decker disappeared and his car was found abandoned, a mystery that was never solved. Fine in a mildly sunned, else fine dust jacket. [#001805] $1,500
Prairie City, Decker Press, (1948). An unrecorded variant of this uncommon title. Gray cloth with the same design as that of the apparently first issue yellow cloth, in a purple and pink floral dust jacket with red and blue lettering, a $2 "Gift Edition" price, and different jacket copy. Near fine in a good dust jacket: the front flap has separated and is laid in. [#001806] $750
(Norfolk), New Directions, (1957). Poetry and prose poems, these being all the new poems Patchen had written since the publication of Red Wine and Yellow Hair in 1949. Rubbing to spine tips; else fine in a near fine, mildly dusty dust jacket. [#019291] $100
Baden, Jonathan Williams, 1953. Poet John Ciardi's copy of Patchen's book, with Ciardi's ownership signature and address stamp and with a few underlinings and a marginal notation in the early pages of the text, presumably made by Ciardi. This is the issue in wrappers, not identified by the bibliographer, and one of 450 copies. With a plain bookmark laid in from the Saturday Review, where Ciardi worked as poetry editor. Near fine in self-wrappers. [#001810] $450
Redruth, Cornwall, U.K., Books and Things/Red Crab Design, [ca. 1972]. A broadside poem in tribute to Miriam and Kenneth Patchen. Number 5 in the Posterpoem series. Approximately 20" x 30". Unevenly folded in 16ths for mailing, and with minor edge wear; near fine. This copy is in an edgeworn envelope addressed to an employee of the St. Mary's University Library in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Uncommon: OCLC lists only one copy as being held in libraries worldwide. [#029877] $375
(NY), (Vehicle), (1978). Her second book, a collection of short prose poems. Of a total edition of 500 copies, this is one of 474 copies in wrappers. Inscribed by the author in 1979. Slight rubbing to the spine folds, else fine; a very nice copy. [#011223] $275
NY, Vehicle Editions, (1978). The issue in wrappers of her second book, a collection of poems and prose poems, one of 474 copies of a total edition of 500; inscribed by the author to Seymour Lawrence in the year of publication. Additionally, laid in is an autograph postcard signed "the counter." Lawrence became Phillips' publisher with her next book, Black Tickets, which was her first collection of prose and the first book she had published by a major publisher. The postcard is fine; the book near fine. [#004287] $475
(Sequoyah)
Washington, Government Printing Office, 1924. Proceedings of the 65th Congress, June 6, 1917, in Statuary Hall, upon the unveiling and presentation of the statue of Sequoyah by the state of Oklahoma; together with the proceedings of the House and Senate accepting the statue in the previous days. Includes in the text a poem by Alexander Posey, "Ode to Sequoyah," which was read into the record. Spots of light rubbing to cloth; very good, without a dust jacket, probably as issued. [#003229] $25
Miami, Pandenus Press, (1952). One of 225 copies of this attractive oversize volume that collects Spanish translations of five of Pound's poems, including three of the Cantos. This copy is inscribed by one of the translators, Margaret Bates. Covers foxed; near fine in self-wrappers. [#027456] $250
NY, Knopf, 1918. A collection of poems, literary essays and commentary, and an early title for Pound, considered by many the most important American poet of the 20th century. Signed by Pound on the frontispiece, below his photograph. First issue binding. Front hinge weak; cloth rubbed at the edges and joints. Owner name and addresses on the front pastedown, and a photograph tipped to the rear pastedown, with a quote in an unknown hand attributed to Ira V. Morris. A good copy. [#030779] $1,500
Garden City, Doubleday, 1970. A complimentary copy, with a Doubleday "Compliments of" card laid in signed by the author. A collection of concrete poetry, about which Richard Kostelanetz wrote in 1973: "Only one one-man collection of visual poetry... has ever been commercially published in the United States, even though 'concrete' is reportedly 'faddish'; and since that single book, N.H. Pritchard's The Matrix (1970), was neither reviewed nor touted, it seemed unlikely that any others would ever appear -- another example of how the rule of precedent in literary commerce produces de facto censorship." Dust jacket blurb by Allen Ginsberg, among others. Modest glue bleed to the hinges, light corner tap; near fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#032670] $150
(Anthology)
NY, Random House, (1973). The uncorrected proof copy, inscribed by George Quasha. Light dust soiling; else fine in wrappers. [#001208] $45
(Tulsa), (Western Publishing), (1990). Poetry, by a former helicopter pilot in Vietnam, who suffered post traumatic stress disorder after the war. Most of the poems have the same simple rhyme scheme, and each has its own epilogue, longer than the poem. Label removal abrasion front flyleaf; else fine in a fine dust jacket. [#010368] $80
NY, Grove Press, (1955). Poetry, issued in a lettered edition of 26 copies and a numbered edition of 250 copies: this is a presentation copy (designated as "s.c. 3 for Nancy"), signed by the author and, as with the lettered issue, with an original drawing by Irene Rice Pereira, the author's wife, signed by the artist as frontispiece. It can be assumed that the presentation copies ("s.c" -- "special copy"?) were even more limited than the lettered copies, as is almost always the case in the issuance of limited editions such as this. A fine copy in a professionally restored dust jacket. Laid in is an autograph holiday card addressed to Nancy and her partner and signed by Reavey for himself and Irene, with an image by Pereira from the collection of the Whitney Museum. A significant volume, with an original work of art by a distinguished American abstract artist: Pereira's work is in the permanent collections of the National Gallery of Art, the National Museum of American Art, and the National Museum of Women in the Arts, among many others. [#014615] $1,500
NY, RH, (1973). Uncorrected proof copy. A collection of poetry by the author of Mumbo Jumbo and the editor of Yardbird. Near fine in tall wrappers and signed by the author. [#006636] $100
NY, Random House, (1973). A collection of poetry by the author of Mumbo Jumbo and editor of Yardbird -- the second collection by this African American poet. This is the issue in wrappers, with erratum slip laid in. Inscribed by the author to another poet and novelist: "To ___/ a superb/ poet/ Ishmael/ profound affection." Near fine. [#020486] $100
NY, Norton, (1967). Her third book, and while her first was published in the prestigious Yale Younger Poets series and her second was nominated for the National Book Award, this is the title that is generally considered her first fully mature work. The revised reissue. Small bookstore stamp front flyleaf; fine in a near fine dust jacket with a small chip at the crown. [#004329] $45
(Norman), University of Oklahoma, (1921). One poem by Riggs, who attended the university beginning in 1919, and later taught freshman English there as well. This publication precedes his first book by several years. Inscribed by the editor, Joseph Francis Paxton, in 1922. Pages browning with age; front hinge starting; a very good copy, with a list of corrections tipped to a rear blank. Uncommon, early appearance by Riggs. [#025713] $175
Lewiston, Confluence Press, (1994). The simultaneous issue in wrappers of this collection of the poet's first five books. Inscribed by the author to another poet -- "fellow scribbler and cloud-herder." Fine. [#023063] $45
Marvin, Blue Cloud Quarterly, 1980. An excerpt from Lost Copper, illustrated by the author. Issued as Blue Cloud Quarterly, Vol. 25, No. 4. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#025723] SOLD
NY, Greenfield Review Press, 1973. The first book by this Hopi/Miwok writer, a collection of poems published by Joseph Bruchac's press and only issued in wrappers. With illustrations by the author. Near fine in stapled wrappers. [#003210] SOLD
Banning, Malki Museum Press, 1980. A review copy, so stamped on the front flyleaf, of this book that was published on the Morongo Indian Reservation. Inscribed by the author to another Native American poet: "For ____, Whose back must be bent though not broken from the weight of that same Dream Wheel - The destination is, must be, worth it!" With the recipient's handmade bookplate on the front flyleaf. Dust jacket panels clipped and pasted to boards; fine such as it is. A nice association copy. [#025722] $125
(Pocket Poets Series)
San Francisco, City Lights Books, (1959). Edited and translated by Rothenberg, his first book. Rothenberg went on to became a highly regarded poet in his own right and a champion of ethnopoetics, founding the influential journal Alcheringa. Owner name. Near fine in wrappers. [#017568] $30
(London), Bogle-L'Ouverture, (1988). The hardcover issue of this collection of poetry. Signed by the author. Age-toning to page edges; still fine in a fine dust jacket. [#915533] $100
Marvin, Blue Cloud Quarterly, 1981. Poetry and prose poems by a white writer who taught at Navajo Community College and did his dissertation on "Literary Translators of Native American Literature." Issued as Vol. 27, No. 3 of The Blue Cloud Quarterly. Mailing address of Joseph Bruchac; fine in stapled wrappers. [#025728] SOLD
Marvin, Blue Cloud Quarterly, 1980. A collection of poems in the series of books he wrote that were all entitled Indian Thoughts, each with a different subtitle. Illustrated by Arline Borgquist Russell. Inscribed by the author to Joe Bruchac. Fine in stapled wrappers. A good association copy. [#025731] $70
Kansas City, BkMk, (1975). Seventeen poems by Russell, under the title "A Great Chief," part of the series of books he wrote under the umbrella title of Indian Thoughts. The other poets featured are Frank Higgins and Gordon Osing. Slight staining to rear cover; near fine in wrappers. Unmarked, but from the library of Native American author, performer, and publisher Joseph Bruchac. [#031735] $45
Marvin, Blue Cloud Quarterly, 1982. The second book, and second collection of poems, by this writer of Yunwiya Cherokee heritage who has since gone on to write highly praised fiction and science fiction. Blue Cloud Quarterly, Vol. 28, No. 2. Mailing address of Joseph Bruchac. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#025734] SOLD
Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1971. His second book, the clothbound issue. Inscribed by the author to another poet: "For ___/ with love/ thanks/ Stephen/ Bennington/(In a Blizzard)." Slight splaying to boards; else fine in a near fine dust jacket with one corner tear and rubbing to the front flap fold. [#027478] $40
NY, Hyperion, (1998). His second novel. Inscribed by the author to a Native American poet "for your wonderful poetry..." in 2000, and with the recipient's ownership signature on flyleaf. Fine in a fine dust jacket. A good association copy. [#025737] $60
Cambridge/Nelson, Privately Printed, (n.d.)[c. 1959]. A broadside poem, 8" x 11-3/4"; printed in green on cream paper. Top edge sunned with several small edge tears; near fine. Uncommon. [#019332] $125
(NY), New Directions, (1950). His fifth collection of poems. Some minor edge sunning; else fine in a slightly dusty, near fine dust jacket. An attractive copy of this title. [#004835] $100
(Vancouver), Polestar, (1996). His second collection of poetry. Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#016849] $30
(Shamal Books)
NY, Shamal Books, (1976-1978). Four of the first six titles published by Shamal Books, a publishing company founded by the Nuyorican poet, historian, and community activist Louis Reyes Rivera and his wife, Barbara Killens Rivera, daughter of African American novelist John Oliver Killens. Reyes was a key figure in the CUNY movement, a grass roots effort to make the City University of New York more responsive to minorities and the poor. Titles include: Poets in Motion, an anthology edited by Louis Reyes Rivera; Who Pays the Cost by Rivera; Nubiana Vol. I by B.J. Ashanti; and Nom Nomm Nommo by Zizwe Omowale-Wa-Ngafua. The latter is perfectbound; the others are in stapled wrappers; each is very near fine. Early books from a press that published for another two decades; an obituary of Reyes said he edited, translated or published over 200 books in his lifetime, many of them by Caribbean, African or African-American writers. [#031755] $200
NY, Reynal & Hitchcock, (1947). The limited edition of this collection of poems and a play. Number 214 of 250 numbered copies signed by the author. A near fine copy, lacking the original tissue dust jacket, in a somewhat worn slipcase that is split at one seam. [#004845] $45
Colombes/Battle Creek, Cary/Peaceways, (1967). The French edition (bilingual) of this self-published book of protest poetry. Shelley was a Vice Presidential candidate in 1964 on a write-in Peace Ticket. Near fine in wrappers. Laid in is an International Herald Tribune article, dated December 29, 1967, about Shelley's protests of the Vietnam War at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Paris. [#028826] $45
Phoenix, Baleen Press, (1972). The hardcover issue of this collection of poetry by a writer known for his writings on the American Southwest, including the memoir Going Back to Bisbee. Illustrated by Douglas Denniston. Inscribed by the author to another poet. Oblong quarto. Faint dampstaining to cloth; fading to spine; very good, without dust jacket (as issued?). [#022799] $80
Ottawa, Carleton University Press, 1992. Poetry, this being the simultaneous issue in wrappers. Fine. [#912733] $70
Ottawa, Borealis, 1972. The first book, a collection of poetry, by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Stone Diaries. Inscribed by Shields to the Canadian poet and novelist Rosemary Aubert: "For Rosemary/ with thanks for a delightful evening/ Carol Shields." Spine faded, with a little tear to the spine base; near fine in wrappers. A nice literary association copy of an important first book. [#029530] $750
Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 2008. A collection of poems, warmly inscribed to Peter and Maria Matthiessen. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#032523] $100
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Catalog 168