E-list # 138

Poetry

NY, Macmillan, 1959. The first book, a collection of poems, by this writer who later became the Poet Laureate of the U.S. Modest insect damage near the spine; near fine in wrappers. [#025964] $30
London, Collins Harvill, 1989. The uncorrected proof copy of the first British edition of these posthumously published poems, many of them quite moving, and addressing his impending death quite straightforwardly, even bluntly, in his characteristic, plain-spoken manner. With an introduction by Tess Gallagher. Corner crease to front cover; near fine in wrappers. [#012741] $80
Santa Barbara, Capra, 1976. Copy No. 1 of the hardcover issue of Carver's third collection of poems. Of a total edition of 1100 copies, this is one of 100 hardcover copies signed by Carver. Slight evidence of dampness on the first few pages and the lower edge of the text block; near fine without dust jacket, as issued. Illustrated with drawings by Marcia/maris. [#032752] $850
Santa Barbara, Capra Press, 1976. The hardcover issue of Carver's third collection of poems, and his second book to be issued by Capra. Of a total edition of 1100 copies, this is one of 100 numbered hardcover copies signed by Carver. Fine without dust jacket, as issued. Illustrated with drawings by Marcia/maris. [#912310] $750
Concord, Ewert, 1986. A collection of poems. Of a total edition of 136, this is one of 10 sets of advance sheets prepared by the publisher. Twelve 9" x 12" double flat gatherings printed on the rectos only, laid into a gray folding cardstock case, with a card laid in presenting the sheets with compliments, indicating the limitation, and signed by the publisher. A fine set of this rare advance issue. [#012110] $350
Concord, William B. Ewert, 1986. A collection of poems. One of 10 sets of advance sheets prepared by the publisher. Twelve 9" x 12" double flat gatherings printed on the rectos only, laid into a gray folding cardstock case, with a card laid in presenting the sheets with compliments, indicating the limitation, and signed by the publisher. A fine set of this rare advance issue. [#912317] $350
London, Collins Harvill, 1987. This title was only published in England, and is a collection of poems from Carver's two Random House collections in the U.S. -- Where Water Comes Together With Other Water and Ultramarine. They have been rearranged, and an epigraph added to the collection that doesn't appear in either U.S. volume. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#912326] $175
Concord, Ewert, 1985. A small broadside poem on heavy, textured card stock, measuring 8-1/2" x 5-1/2". Like My Crow a year earlier, these were printed "for private distribution" as a holiday greeting. Of a total edition of 136 copies, this is copy 32 of 36 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine. [#912350] $325
NY, Random House, (1986). The uncorrected proof copy of his second major collection of poems. Near fine in wrappers. [#011391] $100
(Santa Cruz), (Kayak Books), (1970). The rare white issue of Carver's first regularly published book (after Near Klamath, published by the English Club of Sacramento State College). Kayak Books was a small but established publisher, which produced a literary magazine as well as issuing books of poetry. Winter Insomnia is a collection of poems, designed and printed by George Hitchcock and illustrated with prints by Robert McChesney. Issued in an attractive edition of 1000 copies, the overwhelming majority (perhaps more than 99%) were issued in yellow wrappers. William Stull's Carver checklist said that three copies were known in the white wrappers. Since that checklist was published, we have seen three more copies in white wrappers, including this one, bringing the total number of known copies to six. Without knowing exactly how many white copies there were, we can say with assurance that this issue is exceedingly scarce; we've seen dozens, if not hundreds, of the issue in yellow wrappers. This copy is inscribed by Carver: "For Rush - with good wishes. Ray Carver. 3-3-83." Spine and edge sunning to covers; near fine. [#914629] $3,000
(Santa Cruz), (Kayak), (1970). Carver's first regularly published book, a collection of poems, issued in an attractive edition of 1000 copies designed and printed by George Hitchcock and illustrated with prints by Robert McChesney. Bound in yellow wrappers printed in green. (A few copies were bound in white wrappers printed in green.) Signed by the author. Fine. [#912361] $750
(Chico), (Chico State University), 1960. The first issue of the Chico State literary magazine, of which Carver was a founding editor. The biographical introduction to the included William Carlos Williams poem, "The Gossips," is, as far as we can tell, the first piece of writing Carver published other than a 1958 letter to the editor of the Chico State student newspaper. The introduction gives a brief summary of Williams' life, a capsule summary and analysis of his poetry, and a brief, partial listing of the honors and awards he had won. Carver's first work of fiction, "Furious Seasons," was published in a later issue of Selection that same year. A very uncommon, early appearance in print by Carver. This copy bears the ownership name and address of Raymond Carver's brother, James. This is the only copy we have ever seen. Near fine in stapled wrappers. [#032756] $1,250
(Marvin), Blue Cloud Quarterly, 1975. Vol. 21, No. 2 of the Blue Cloud Quarterly. A poem based on Hopi myth, believed to derive from the much earlier Anasazi culture. Inscribed by the author to Joe and Carol [Bruchac] in the year of publication, a nice association copy. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#025390] $100
NY, Random House, (1974). Uncorrected proof copy of this collection of poetry, her first book. Signed by the author. Publisher's ink comments crossed out in pencil on front cover; else near fine in tall wrappers. [#001343] $70
New Haven, Yale University Press, 1968. Review copy of the hardcover issue of this volume in the Yale Series of Younger Poets. Inscribed by the author in 1976. Cloth splattered with tiny ink dots; hence very good in a very good dust jacket with publication information written on front panel. [#001344] $25
Porthenys, [Self-Published?], 1988. Copy #58 of 100. Inscribed by the author to Peter Matthiessen and with a typed letter signed laid in: "I found this one copy of this tiny book, and I thought to send it to you the night before our departure for the old world (well it's all old and new isn't it?). I hear that you had a similar experience to what these little poems speak out from..." Chaskey continues in the letter with more personal news. More than 100 words. Poet-farmer Chaskey was the longtime head of Quail Hill Farm in Amagansett, New York, in eastern Long Island, and is considered "the spiritual father of the community farming movement." His first full-length book, the influential This Common Ground, was published in 2005; this chapbook precedes that book by nearly two decades. Near fine in self-wrappers. [#032274] $200
NY, Simon & Schuster, (1970). The first book of poetry by the later director of the National Endowment for the Arts' Southwest Poetry Program. Inscribed by Claremon to Native American poet and novelist James Welch: "For Jim Welch, Amigo -- Neil Claremon." This is the simultaneous issue in wrappers. 1-1/2" triangular corner chip to lower rear cover; else near fine. Laid in is a typed letter signed telling Welch of a trip to Round Rock (photo enclosed) in the company of Simon Ortiz and also of a new book Claremon is working on (likely West of the American Dream). Also laid in is a photocopy of the "final draft" of his poem "At Canyon de Chelly." The letter and poem are folded; near fine. A nice association with the author of the poetry collection Riding the Earthboy 40 and the novels Winter in the Blood and Fools Crow, among others. [#020171] $100
Princeton, Princeton University Press, (2005). An advance reading copy of the first paperback edition of this bilingual (Dutch/English) collection of poetry from the Netherlands, first published in hardcover in 2003. Translated and introduced by Coetzee. Faint paperclip imprint upper front cover; still fine in wrappers. [#031565] $45
(Marvin), (Blue Cloud Quarterly), (1980). A prolific author of Cherokee descent, Conley is a highly praised writer in several fields. This, his first book, is a collection of poems about his father-in-law, whom he never got a chance to meet. Inscribed by the author. Together with a postcard [NY: Strawberry Press] printing the 19th poem (or stanza, if Adawosgi is to be read as one long poem), which differs only in punctuation from the published text. The card is also inscribed by Conley, on behalf of himself and his wife: "To our friend ____, we hope that we've helped to make your summer a memorable one." The card is fine; the chapbook is fine in stapled wrappers. Scarce signed; and this is the first time we've seen the postcard. [#030008] $350
On Sale: $228
Muskogee, Indian University Press, 1984. A bilingual (Cherokee/English) collection, with illustrations by the author. An uncommon early book by this writer who has since published numerous books of fiction, including two that won the Spur Award from the Western Writers of America. Number 459 of 500 numbered copies, apparently only issued in wrappers. Although not called for, this copy is signed by the author in both English and Cherokee. Spine sunned; light general wear; near fine. [#030770] $350
(Woodbridge), Viet Nam Generation & Burning Cities Press, (1994). White Noise Poetry Series #1, a volume of poems and short prose pieces about the Vietnam War, written by a Vietnam vet who declares that he "takes pride in having been, and continues to be, a Vietnam Veteran Against the War." VVAW was a group of veterans who banded together to express opposition to the war and later to hold a public investigation into atrocities and war crimes in Vietnam. Inscribed by the author, "I wish you peace." Owner name inside front cover; fine in wrappers, with glossary of names and terms laid in. Uncommon. [#029735] $45
NY, Vantage Press, (1977). The first book by this Crow Creek Sioux author. A collection of stories and poems published by a so-called "vanity press." Illustrations by two Native American artists, Sam Leader Charge and his wife, Sonny Tuttle. Cook-Lynn is the author of The Power of Horses and From the River's Edge, among others, and is one of the most highly praised and frequently anthologized Native American writers working today. She has written a novel, Aurelia: A Crow Creek Trilogy, and co-authored The Politics of Hallowed Ground: Wounded Knee and the Struggle for Indian Sovereignty. Small owner name on front flyleaf, otherwise a fine copy in a very near fine dust jacket with trace rubbing at the corners. Scarce: vanity press books from this era often received no distribution from their publishers at all, and were eventually pulped; often the only copies that circulated were the ones the author distributed. Vantage Press, which published this book, was one of the oldest vanity presses in the U.S.; it lost a class action lawsuit filed by its authors when a judge determined that its claim to be an actual publisher was fraudulent, and the press did not promote or distribute copies of the authors' books. The firm had to pay $3.5 million in punitive damages. [#030771] SOLD
Saint Paul, Coffee House Press, 1987. Comb-bound galley sheets of this small press production, a book of poetry by the founding editor of the influential literary magazine Origin. Long sheets printed on rectos only, laid into a labeled folder along with promotional material. Fine. Uncommon. [#027585] SOLD
Self-Published, [ca. 1980s]. A collection of 14 poems, each poem titled with Connell's book titles, "selected and edited by Ruth Costello," although no other author is given. With a foreword by novelist Anne Lamott, the adoptive daughter of one of Costello's close friends, Mary Turnbull, a "literary champion and patron of the arts," and later a longtime bookstore owner in Marin County. Unmarked, but from the library of Peter Matthiessen. Near fine. Laid in is a printout of a 1985 Costello poem, "For Lama Anagarika Govinda," with a note in Matthiessen's hand on the verso. [#032279] $150
Self-Published, [ca. 1980s]. A collection of 12 poems, velobound, in gold-stamped plastic covers, by a writer who was closely involved with the San Francisco Bay Area literary scene for decades. Herbert Gold was one of the many writers who made his home in the Bay Area during that time, and this collection includes one poem titled after each of Gold's books of fiction up until 1980 (with one book un-poemed). Near fine. Unmarked, but from the library of Peter Matthiessen. Unusual, highly uncommon artifact of one of the great literary centers of postwar America. [#032278] $150
Waco, Motive, 1946. An influential essay by this poet and critic, who was an early and longtime friend of Henry Miller and various other literary and artistic figures. Inscribed by the author in 1952 to Mary Shore, a painter and friend of Charles Olson. Near fine in stapled wrappers and a very good, dampstained dust jacket with two small holes on the rear panel. [#016169] $125
Ontario, CA, Silhouettes Press, (1936). Laid in is a sheaf of typescript poems by the author, with holograph annotations by her. Very good without dust jacket (as issued?) and inscribed by the author. [#010520] $40
Austin, U. of Texas, (1965). Poetry. One of only 1000 copies. With a foreword by Allen Tate. Fine in a near fine, spine-tanned dust jacket. [#012766] $30
Chicago, Poetry, 1953. Warmly and lengthily inscribed by Dahlberg at his contribution, "Ushant, A Long Lotus Sleep," an excerpt from a work-in-progress. Near fine in wrappers. [#017387] $125
(Pittsburgh), U. of Pittsburgh Press, (1984). A collection of poetry that won the 1983 Agnes Lynch Starrett Poetry Prize. This is the simultaneous issue in wrappers. Signed by the author and additionally inscribed to another poet in the year of publication. Fine. [#011797] $70
Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1924. First book by one of the important members of the Fugitive group and co-founder of the Fugitive magazine. Neat label removal abrasion on rear endpaper; else fine in decorated boards, without dust jacket. [#001365] $125
Belfast, Field Day Theatre Company, 1983. Published as Field Day Pamphlet Number 3. Signed by the author. Fine in stapled self-wrappers. [#913912] $100
(Dublin), Gallery, (1983). The hardcover issue. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#913913] $100
(Dublin), Dolmen, (1977). Signed by the author. Slight edge sunning; near fine in self-wrappers. [#913911] $175
(County Meath), Gallery, (1988). The hardcover issue. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#913914] $45
Belfast, Festival Publications, [1966]. His scarce first book, a poetry collection published at Queen's University of Belfast, in Ireland, which the author attended and where he befriended fellow poet, and later Nobel Prize winner, Seamus Heaney. Heaney's first book, Eleven Poems, was published in the same series of chapbooks as this title. Deane's first novel, Reading in the Dark, not published until 1996, was shortlisted for the Booker Prize and won the Irish Times International Fiction Prize and the Irish Literature Prize in 1997. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#915762] $750
NY, George Braziller, (1978). The hardcover issue. Inscribed by the author to another writer in 1979. Pages foxed; near fine in a near fine dust jacket. Laid in is an autograph note signed by DeFrees, who has replied on the bottom and verso of a note written to her, transmitting a copy of the author's novel. DeFrees replies that she is working on an article on James Wright and offers to be in touch after reading her correspondent's book. The note is creased; near fine. Also laid in is the printed text of the poem "Dominance: A Museum Guide," as delivered at the installation of new members, Phi Beta Kappa, Massachusetts Nu Chapter, May 26, 1984. Folded; staple holes upper corner; near fine. [#022337] $60
(n.p.), Suffolk County Community College, 1985. Inscribed by De'Pazzi, who has two poems and a drawing in the collection and served on the editorial board. Near fine in stapled wrappers. [#031870] $40
(Madison), Sixties Press, 1964. Short essays and reviews of poetry and poets, Dickey's first book of prose and a controversial book in which the author pulled no punches in criticizing the poets of his era. With flap copy about Dickey and the book by Robert Bly, the publisher. Signed by the author. Near fine in a good dust jacket with several small edge chips but split along the lower half of the front flap fold. With a "compliments of the publisher" card laid in. [#025980] $100
NY, Harper & Row, (1977). Annie Dillard's own copy of this small book of poetic meditations, marked by her on nearly two dozen pages (roughly a third of the book). The great majority of the markings serve as a map, as though for a reading, including the instruction "pause." Perhaps two or three instances of editing. Holy the Firm was Dillard's third book, and her intention was to write about whatever happened on Lummi Island, where she was living, during a three-day period. When an airplane crashed on the island on the second day, it caused her to meditate on the problem of pain, and how a just and merciful God would allow natural evil to occur in the world. These meditations on pain, God, and evil continued to resonate throughout her work, particularly in her award-winning volume For the Time Being, published in 1999, more than 20 years after this book. Near fine in a very near fine dust jacket. "Ex Libris Annie Dillard" bookplate on the verso of the half title. A unique copy of one of the volumes that characterizes Dillard's unique place in our literature: Holy the Firm is only 66 pages long but took her 14 months of writing full-time to complete, and it embodies her concerns with philosophy -- in Greek, literally, "the love of wisdom" -- as well as religion, metaphysics, the natural world, and the place of human life and consciousness within and among all of these. [#032716] SOLD
NY, Harper & Row, (1982). The author's own copy of this collection of essays, her fifth book. Signed by the author, with her corrections to at least five pages of text, and with her markings and self-instructions for what appears to be a reading from the text. Dillard has taped a square of paper to the front board listing the pages with "Corrections," under her heading "be wise - write it down." Small sticker taped to the spine, with the fading word, "MINE." "Ex Libris Annie Dillard" bookplate on the front pastedown. One essay in this collection was chosen for the Best Essays of the Twentieth Century volume and another won New York Women's Press Club award for its year. Several page corners turned. Outer corner of text block stained. A very good copy, lacking the dust jacket and, with the author's own markings and changes. Unique. [#032717] SOLD
(Columbia), University of Missouri Press, (1974). Her first book, a collection of poetry, which begins: "Today I saw a wood duck/ in Tinker Creek." Inscribed by the author to her second husband, prior to their marriage: "For Gary/ from Annie/ February 13, 1976/ Lummi Island." Dillard and Gary Clevidence were married from 1980-1988. "Ex Libris Annie Dillard" bookplate on the half title, which we are told was applied by the author prior to a selection of her books going to auction. Mild foxing to the page edges and thin, flexible cloth boards; near fine in a near fine, spine- and edge-sunned dust jacket. A notable association copy: the book is dedicated to her first husband, Richard, and this copy is inscribed to her second husband, after her divorce but before her second marriage. [#032714] SOLD
Providence, Burning Deck, (1974). One of 300 copies. Inscribed by the author in 1978. Fine in self-wraps. [#001381] $30
NY, Holt Rinehart Winston, (1984). The uncorrected proof copy. Fine in wrappers. [#913037] SOLD
NY, Atheneum, 1972. A review copy of his first book, a collection of poetry that was the 1971 Lamont Poetry Selection. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with a short tear near the spine. With erratum slip, Lamont Selection card, and complimentary notice from the Academy of American Poets laid in. [#913030] $70
NY, Atheneum, 1976. Poems. Fine in wrappers. [#913032] $30
(n.p.), Tangram, (2013). A collection of seven-syllable poems. One of 200 copies in saddle-stitched self-wrappers. Dodge is a novelist and poet, and author of Fup, Not Fade Away, and Stone Junction, among others. Small spot to rear cover, else fine. Laid is to this copy is a letter from the publisher, Jerry Reddan, to Peter [Matthiessen] transmitting the copy and saying that Dodge's health and teaching commitments had delayed the title for about 7 years. Uncommon. [#032281] $250
(n.p.), Tangram, (1998). A suite of poems "offered as an homage to the vernacular of northcoast working people," plus an introduction. One of 200 copies. This copy is inscribed by Dodge to another writer and signed "Jim." Fine in saddle-stitched self-wrappers. Dodge is the author of the novels Not Fade Away and Stone Junction as well as the underground classic Fup, about a magical duck. A nice association copy of an attractive and uncommon small press production. [#026970] $175
Candia, John LeBow, 1996. Limited edition consisting of two stories and thirteen poems. Of a total edition of 476 copies, this is one of 26 lettered copies. Signed by the author and the artist, Dina Knapp. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#912478] $100
Candia, John LeBow, 1996. Limited edition consisting of two stories and thirteen poems. Of a total edition of 476 copies, this is Copy #1 of 150 numbered copies in wrappers, signed by the author. Although not called for, this copy is also signed by the artist, Dina Knapp. Fine. [#912477] $45
NY, Harcourt Brace, (1947). Later printing of Lowell's first book, winner of the 1947 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. Inscribed by Robert Duncan to poet Landis Everson in 1948. Name ("Everson") on front pastedown; dampstained lower board edges; very good in a good, dampstained dust jacket with modest rubbing and edge creasing. A nice association. [#020396] $200
On Sale: $130
(n.p.), (n.p.), (1979). A prose poem with an illustration by Alaina Lara. Printed as Arboreal Abomination #1. Signed by the author. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#912481] $80
London, Faber and Faber, (1955). Poetry by the author of The Alexandria Quartet. Offsetting to endpages; thus near fine in a near fine, spine-darkened dust jacket with one edge tear. [#020696] $40
Long Island, Backstreet, (1982). Copy No. 100 of 526 numbered copies of this collection of poems by Ehrhart, Jeptha Evans, and Kraft Rompf. Text block threatening to separate from covers due to drying of glue; near fine in wrappers. [#028628] $45
(Stafford), Northwoods Press, (1980). Poetry about the war. This is the issue in wrappers. Rubbed; near fine. [#010353] $40
(Stafford), Northwoods Press, (1980). Poetry about the war. This is the issue in wrappers. Owner name. Rubbed; near fine. [#010354] $30
Richford, Samisdat, 1980. An omnibus volume collecting the poems in his three earlier Samisdat pamphlets, along with new poems. Fine in wrappers. [#010351] $70
Richford, Samisdat, 1980. An omnibus volume collecting the poems in his three earlier Samisdat pamphlets, along with new poems. Near fine in wrappers. [#010352] $50
Santa Barbara, Capricorn Press, 1970. The first book by the author of The Solace of Open Spaces and Heart Mountain, among others, a collection of poems. This is one of 550 copies of the issue in wrappers, of a total edition of 600 copies. Inscribed by the author in 1992. Mild edge-sunning; else fine. [#026009] $300
Garden City, Doubleday, 1973. The uncorrected proof copy of this large collection of stories and prose poems, in the form of tall, bound galley sheets printed on rectos only. Stamped "Final Galley." A number of the galley pages are loose but all are present. Near fine in wrappers and signed by the author. Scarce, fragile format. [#001425] $100
New Rochelle, The Elizabeth Press, (1975). Hardcover, 1/250 copies, printed in Italy. Inscribed by the author "with love". A fine copy in publisher's plain cardboard slipcase. [#002084] $45
(New Rochelle), (The Elizabeth Press), (1966). One of 500 copies in wrappers. Inscribed by the author "with love". Important press. Near fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#002076] $45
(Native American)
(NY), HarperCollins, (2003). The advance reading copy of this collection of selected and new poems, her first poetry collection in 14 years. Signed by the author. Erdrich is best-known as a novelist: her first novel, Love Medicine, won the National Book Critics Circle Award in 1984; her novel The Round House won the 2012 National Book Award. One shallow corner crease, else fine in wrappers. An uncommon advance issue, and a scarce title signed in any issue or format. [#032810] $125
Hopewell, Pied Oxen Printers, 2006. A long poem by Eshleman in memory of his longtime friend, the artist Bill Paden, who died in 2004. Of a total edition of 50 copies, this is one of 15 numbered copies reserved for the poet and for the printer, David Sellers. Signed by Eshleman and Sellers. With a Hanga woodcut frontispiece signed by Bill Paden and numbered as one of 100 copies but, according to the colophon, no more than 30 were completed before Paden's death. A fine copy, from the library of author Clayton Eshleman. Letter of provenance available. [#027889] $1,000
(NY), Caterpillar, (1967). Poems by Eshleman, issued as Caterpillar X. Copy 10 of 300 numbered copies. Not signed on the colophon, but inscribed by Eshleman to Alan Brilliant of Unicorn Press. Tapebound in tall cardstock covers. Some offsetting to title page around the address portion of mailing envelope that is laid in; near fine. [#028759] $70
Berkeley, Oyez, (1966). One of 1000 copies. Fine in a very near fine dust jacket, with the publisher's prospectus laid in. [#001437] $45
(Newcastle), Blue Oak Press, 1977. The limited edition. One of 100 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#006917] $125
Garden City, Doubleday, 1967. A sequence of love poems, and a spiritual autobiography. This is an advance review copy and is signed by the author as "William Everson." Owner name front flyleaf; fine in a dust jacket that is missing a piece from the rear panel, and has a tear at the top of the rear flap fold--thus only good. Jacket photo by Thomas Merton. [#006915] $70
NY, Atheneum, 1977. The author's second collection of poetry; his first was the Lamont Prize winner of 1972. Inscribed by Everwine to another poet. Recipient's handmade bookplate; fine in wrappers. [#022903] $45
San Francisco, Cadmus, (1993). A poetry collection by a Vietnam vet. Fine in wrappers. [#010356] $30
NY, Jargon Society, 1972. The hardcover issue. Fine in a fine dust jacket and inscribed by the author in 1978. [#001442] $60
NY, Jargon Society, 1972. Fine in self-wraps and inscribed by the author in 1976. [#001441] $40
NY, Yale University Press, (2009). Inscribed by the author to Peter Matthiessen, who is quoted once in the book, on page 169: "That the snow leopard is, that it is there, that its frosty eyes watch us from the mountain -- that is enough." Near fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#031888] $100
London, Fortune Press, (1967). A volume of poetry by this Gloucester, MA, poet who was a longtime friend and sometime rival of poet Charles Olson, who directed a critical part of The Maximus Poems at Ferrini. Ferrini's response was a 30-page love poem, which was published as In the Arriving and which Olson later said was Ferrini's best book. Despite a rivalry that has been characterized as "brotherly," they remained close friends throughout Olson's life. Inscribed by the author: "____/ the heart of the book/ Vincent." The recipient's name was deliberately abraded by the recipient. Fine in a near fine, modestly edgeworn dust jacket. [#016201] $350
(Berkeley), (Crooked Cloud), (1997). A chapbook collection, one of 500 copies. This copy is inscribed by the author to Peter [Matthiessen], with the author's address written in Matthiessen's hand at the bottom of the page. Fine in stapled wrappers. Fields died in 1999. [#032473] SOLD
Marvin, Blue Cloud Quarterly Press, 1982. Issued as Blue Cloud Quarterly, Vol. 28, No. 3. Poems derived from specific American Indian songs and legends, with an index identifying the sources and a three page introduction by the author explaining his use of Native American themes and tales. Mailing address of Joseph Bruchac; fine in stapled wrappers. [#025467] SOLD
(NY), Avon, (1976). Poems, written as epitaphs to the dead of an imaginary company. Simple, direct, and moving. Published as a paperback original by the most literary of the mass-market publishers, and later reprinted in a trade paperback by Permanent Press. Several of the poems were included in the anthology Unaccustomed Mercy, but the complete text is difficult to find in any edition and scarce in the true first. This copy is inscribed by Floyd to the poet Ai, winner of the National Book Award. Slight edge and corner rubbing; near fine in wrappers. One of the books on our list of the 25 Best Book on the Vietnam War. [#028636] SOLD
(Port Townsend), Copper Canyon, (1981). The limited edition, and the true first edition, of her second collection of poetry, the 1981 Lamont Poetry selection of the Academy of American Poets. Her first collection was published in the prestigious Yale Younger Poets series. This collection became the paradigm of "engaged" and activist poetry in the late '70s and early '80s. One of 200 copies signed by the author. Preceding the trade edition by several months. Fine. [#028219] $350
Kathmandu, Bardo Matrix, 1974. Starstreams Poetry Series No. 3. One of 500 numbered copies printed on rice paper and signed by the author. Lower corner of last page torn, and spine bumped there, otherwise fine in stapled wrappers. [#001465] $80
NY, Henry Holt, (1936). Later printing. Inscribed by the author to Sidney and Bill Watt "from their great friend Robert Frost" and dated in 1958. A nice inscription. Boards mildly mottled; near fine, lacking the dust jacket. [#025084] $350
NY, Henry Holt, (1945). Near fine in a near fine dust jacket with rubbing at the corners and front spine fold. [#021926] $45
Middlebury, Middlebury College Press, 1939. Frost provides the preface, "The Doctrine of Excursions" to this anthology from the famous writers' workshop, which he co-founded and taught at for many years. Frost won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry four times, more than any other poet, and read a poem at President John F. Kennedy's inauguration. He was the U.S. Poet Laureate in 1959. Owner bookplate front pastedown; spine-and edge-sunned; very good, lacking the dust jacket. Signed by Robert Frost. [#025087] SOLD
Carbondale, Southern Illinois U. Press, (1978). First thus, a softcover edition of his scholarly study of Chaucer, published to complement his biography The Life and Times of Chaucer. Done by a university press, this title had a very small hardcover first printing -- 1819 copies in 1977, which was followed by a second hardcover printing prior to this edition. Signed by the author. One light corner bump, else fine in wrappers. [#019681] $150
Chapel Hill, U. of North Carolina Press, (1961). Third poetry collection by Garrett, longtime head of the writers' program at Hollins College. Inscribed by the author. A very good copy in a fair, tape-repaired dust jacket splitting along the spine folds. [#001481] SOLD
(Port Townsend), Copper Canyon Press, (2007). Signed by the author. Additionally inscribed By Gerber to noted book collector Bruce Kahn in the year of publication, expressing gratitude for Kahn's support of Copper Canyon Press. Fine in wrappers. [#916202] $35
Fremont, Sumac, (1978). Inscribed by the author to Peter Matthiessen. A fine copy of the issue in wrappers. [#031906] $70
East Lansing, Michigan State University Press, (1999). Inscribed by the author to Peter [Matthiessen] in 2001. Fine in wrappers. With an autograph letter signed laid in asking for a blurb for his next book, A Second Life. [#031907] $70
(Port Townsend), Copper Canyon Press, (1978). A collection of poems, one of 1000 copies in wrappers of a total edition of 1100 copies. Inscribed by the author to poet Linda Gregg. Fine. [#001482] $45
Baton Rouge, Louisiana State University Press, 1997. A collection of new and selected poems. Signed by Gibson on the title page; inscribed by Gibson to Peter Matthiessen on the half title; and with an additional, long thank you to Matthiessen on the Acknowledgements page, where Matthiessen is also thanked in print. A Matthiessen blurb appears on the dust jacket. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#032474] SOLD
Heerlen, Uitgererij, (1980). A bilingual edition (English/Dutch), with translation by Simon Vinkenoog. One of 1000 copies, of which 100 numbered copies were signed by the author and the translator; this copy is unnumbered but is signed by Ginsberg in 1981. Plutonian Ode was privately printed in 1978; the City Lights edition was published in 1982. Mild edge rubbing and slight splaying to the front cover; near fine in stapled wrappers. [#031688] $250
(Fort Edwards), (ZBS Foundation), (1972). A set of six LPs (long-playing records). With two booklets laid in, including an introduction and an interview (about chai) by Ram Dass and a poem by Allen Ginsberg. Contents fine; boxed rubbed, near fine. [#028746] $125
Duluth, Holy Cow! Press, 1988. A collection of poetry and prose. Slight spine fade; near fine in wrappers. [#025483] SOLD
Baltimore, Contemporary Poetry, 1944. A collection of poems, one of 1000 copies. A nice association copy, inscribed by the author to a painter, the wife (for a time) of a poet. A fine copy in a worn dust jacket severed at the spine. A fragile wartime book. [#016232] $250
(n.p.), Tangram, 2012. Poetry broadside. Unmarked, but from the library of Peter Matthiessen. 8" x 10-1/8". Faint edge crease; still fine. [#031917] $40
Austin, Place of Herons, 1984. The simultaneous wrappered issue of this collection of stories and poems by a writer of Choctaw descent, with illustrations by the author. His second book, the earlier one having been published in 1972. Inscribed by the author to Joseph Bruchac. Fine in wrappers. Blurbs by Gary Snyder, Leonard Cohen, and others. [#025503] $100
Athens, University of Georgia Press, (1993). Bound galleys of this critical study of poetry by Vietnam veterans, in which Gotera analyzes poems from a number of the important anthologies of Vietnam war poetry, as well as several individual author's collections. Long, oblong sheets, printed on rectos only. Comb-bound. Near fine in plain cardstock covers. Unusual format, suggesting few were done. [#030868] $125
NY, Vantage Press, (1977). Vanity press publication by a writer who is identified as "part Indian." A long three-part poem. Fine in a very good dust jacket with some faint dampstaining and one edge tear. [#016643] SOLD
Garden City, Doubleday, 1973. Fine in a fine dust jacket with trace wear at the spine crown. [#012833] $30
(Anthology)
NY, Some, 1976. An anthology in a box, this copy containing the first of two planned installments, the second installment to be added to the box at a later time (so perhaps this is only Some 7). Present are all the first installment items, including, among other things, a pamphlet of poems by James Tate, Robert Bly, Terry Stokes and others and "Dream of an Interview with Joyce Carol Oates" by Estil Loney, an invented interview in which Oates has given up writing for quilting and cheese hockey. Also includes the printed postcard requesting future installments of the "magazine." All elements fine. [#026189] $70
San Francisco, Momo's Press, 1981. An early book by the Filipino-American author of Dogeaters, among other well-received books. Stories, poems and prose poems. This is the simultaneous issue in wrappers. Inscribed by the author to another poet. Rubbing to the spine folds; minor wear. Near fine. A good association copy. [#028437] $70
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New Arrivals Catalog 168