E-list # 138

Poetry

(London), (Latimer Press), (1969). Experimental prose poems by this novelist and playwright. Of a total edition of 1000 copies, of which 250 were in cloth, this is an out of series copy of the issue of 50 printed on Glastonbury antique laid paper and bound in buckram. Signed by the author. Fine without dust wrapper, as issued. [#022831] $45
NY, Crowell, (1969). A collection edited by Aldan, who was nominated for the 1979 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry for Between High Tides. Inscribed by Aldan in the year of publication, with a quote from the 11th century poem "Black Marigolds" and "in memory of race horses, with love." Near fine in a very good dust jacket with a pending chip at the spine base. [#027326] $125
Los Angeles, American Indian Studies Center, (1993). His third collection of poems and prose poems. Illustrations by Elizabeth Woody. Blurbs by Linda Hogan and Simon Ortiz. Only issued in wrappers, but in two slightly different sizes. This is a copy of the smaller issue. 6-7/8" x 9-7/8". Signed by the author. Light crown bump; near fine in wrappers. [#912199] $60
Los Angeles, American Indian Studies Center, (1993). His third collection of poems and prose poems. Illustrations by Elizabeth Woody. Blurbs by Linda Hogan and Simon Ortiz. Only issued in wrappers, but in two slightly different sizes. This copy measures 7" x 10". Signed by the author. Spine-tanned, else fine. [#912197] $80
Brooklyn, Hanging Loose Press, (2000). Stories, poems, and prose poems. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#912204] $70
Detroit, Visible Ink, (1995). Signed by Alexie at his contribution, the poem "13/16." Also includes excerpts from The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven. Subtle corner crease; else fine in wrappers. [#912212] SOLD
Brooklyn, Hanging Loose Press, (1996). A collection of poems and prose poems. This is the limited edition. Copy 28 of 50 numbered copies bound in white cloth and signed by the author, who has added an additional phrase from the book. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#912230] SOLD
Brooklyn, Hanging Loose Press, (1996). The uncorrected proof copy. A collection of poems and prose poems. Fine in wrappers. [#912231] $100
Tucson, SUN/Gemini, 1987. Sun Lizard Chapbook #1. Poetry, one of 1000 copies. Inscribed by the author to Peter Matthiessen, "this walk through the yellow pages, one that should be much easier than his journey through the Himalayas." Sunning and foxing to covers; very good in wrappers. [#032453] SOLD
(NY), Strawberry Press, (1981). A collection of poems published by poet Maurice Kenny's Strawberry Press, with a cover illustration by Wendy Rose. Trace crown bump; else fine in stapled wrappers. [#025288] $80
(NY), Strawberry Press, (1981). A collection of poems published by poet Maurice Kenny's Strawberry Press, with a cover illustration by Wendy Rose. Inscribed by the author to Elaine Jahner, longtime professor of Native American literature at Dartmouth College "with much love & admiration." A nice association copy. Recipient's name to flyleaf; near fine in stapled wrappers. [#026334] $175
Albuquerque, La Confluencia, 1978. Paula Gunn Allen, of Laguna-Sioux-Lebanese descent, is a Professor of Native American Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, and one of the foremost scholars of Native American literature in the country. In addition, she is a poet and novelist, and has edited award-winning collections of Native American women's writing. This is her second book, a collection of poems published by a small New Mexico publisher. Inscribed by the author in 1985 to Laura Coltelli, a well-known critic of Native American literature and the author of Winged Words, a collection of interviews with Native American writers: a nice association copy. Creasing near the spine folds; near fine in wrappers. [#016477] $350
(San Francisco), Taurean Horn Press, (1987). A collection of poetry. Fine in wrappers. [#025289] SOLD
Robbinsdale, Guild Press, (1983). Poetry by a writer of mixed Chippewa/Cree/French Canadian descent. Only issued in wrappers. Fine. [#025292] $30
Brooklyn, Long Haul Press, (1983). Her first book, poetry. Fine in wrappers with a price sticker on the rear panel. This title was expanded and re-issued by another publisher in 1991. [#914410] $175
NY, Grove, (1984). The hardcover issue of her first book, a collection of poetry, published seven years before her award-winning first novel, How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents. Inscribed by the author in January of 1985, the year following publication. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with just slight wear to the spine extremities, and a touch of unnecessary black ink added to the crown. The hardcover issue of this book is very scarce, particularly in fine condition and signed. [#914705] $850
(North Andover), Kat Ran Press, 1998. Autobiographical poems by the Dominican-American author of How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents and In the Time of the Butterflies, among others. With lithographs by Sara Eichner. One of 50 numbered copies of a total edition of 65 signed by the author and the artist, hardbound in handmade flax paper by David Bourbeau of the Thistle Bindery. The second publication by this press, an elaborate production that sold for nearly $1000 at publication and has been out of print for years. Eichner has since become one of the more collectible artists working today. An attractive and uncommon volume. 11-1/2" x 16-1/4". Fine, in the original clamshell case, with a bit of dust soiling, with publisher's prospectus laid in. [#914607] $1,500
(Wilton), Interset Press, (1996). A collection of poems by this Mohawk writer who was removed from her family at a young age and placed in a non-Native adoptive home. Third printing. Signed by the author. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#025296] $40
(Winlaw, B.C.), Polestar, (1990). A collection of poetry by an Anishinabe writer and activist, her first book. Inscribed by the author to Joseph Bruchac with the message "Nokomis blessing us all." Fine in wrappers. [#025297] $100
(Anthology)
Brooklyn, Long Island Review, 1973. Includes poetry by vets as well as an essay on "American Poetry From the Indochina Experience" by Stephen Sossaman, himself an accomplished poet and later a public speaker on the Vietnam experience. Most of Sossaman's essay is a review of Winning Hearts and Minds. Near fine in wrappers. [#010320] $40
(Anthology)
(Chicago), (n.p.), (1972). Vol. 120, No. 6. An issue of Poetry magazine, dedicated to antiwar poems. Contributors include Richard Hugo, Tom Disch, James Schuyler, William Stafford, Philip Levine, and others. Very good. [#010319] SOLD
(Anthology)
London, Nicholson & Watson, 1944. Wartime anthology of poetry and prose, with contributions by Frank O'Connor, Lawrence Durrell, Rhys Davies, Alex Comfort, Sean O'Faolian, George Barker, Fred Urquhart, and many others. Near fine in a very good dust jacket. A remarkably well-preserved copy of a small, fragile volume. [#013078] $45
(Anthology)
(Port Townsend), Copper Canyon Press, (1996). The hardcover issue. Twenty-five years of poetry from Copper Canyon Press, with work by Barry Lopez, Gary Snyder, Carolyn Forche, Kay Boyle, Hayden Carruth, Stephen Berg, Lucille Clifton, Denise Levertov, and many others. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#915768] $50
(Anthology)
(Los Cerrillos), (San Marcos Press), (1977). Subtitled "Recent Poems from 3 Cultures" -- i.e., Indian, Chicano and Anglo. The Native Americans represented include Leslie Marmon Silko, Simon Ortiz, Harold Littlebird, and Joy Harjo, among others. An early appearance by Harjo; her first book had been published the year before. Also a relatively early Silko appearance, just after her first novel, Ceremony, had been published. This copy is inscribed by one of the contributors, Robert Lloyd, on the page his poem is printed on. Remainder mark (?) to top edge; soiling to covers; very good in wrappers. [#016443] SOLD
(Anthology)
Fullerton, Union of Vietnamese in the U, [c.1973]. Bilingual edition of poetry by Vietnamese, mostly about the war but also some folk poetry, etc., with a number of illustrations. Spine heavily faded; otherwise near fine in stapled wrappers. [#010322] $40
(Anthology)
(Washington), (Indochina Mobile Ed. Proj.), (1971). Vietnamese poems, translated into English, with poetry by classic and well-known Vietnamese authors intermingled with poems by students, soldiers and contemporary folk singers. Illustrated with drawings and other artwork by Vietnamese artists. Co-compiled by Don Luce. Obvious sticker removal abrasion; about near fine in wrappers. [#010309] $40
(Anthology)
NY, McGraw Hill, 1972. The wrappered reissue of one of the early, important collections of poetry by Vietnam vets, published by a small press that was started by vets. Later this title was picked up by a major New York publisher and reissued. An important volume, which introduced such writers as W.D. Ehrhart, Michael Casey and Gustav Hasford, among others. Inscribed by Michael Uhl. Very good in wrappers. [#010317] $25
Louisville, Bellarmine, 1989. Inscribed by Appleman on the cover, to his neighbors Peter and Maria [Matthiessen]. Fine in wrappers. [#031793] $45
Fayetteville, University of Arkansas Press, 1996. Inscribed by the author to his neighbor, the writer Peter Matthiessen, and his wife, "with neighborly good wishes," in 1997. Laid in is a typed letter signed conveying the book, along with some reviews. Near fine in wrappers. [#031792] $45
San Francisco, City Lights, (2010). The first American edition. Inscribed by the author to Peter [Matthiessen] and his wife. Fine in wrappers. [#031795] $45
New Rochelle, Elizabeth Press, (1973). The hardcover issue of this collection of verse. Issued in an edition of 400 copies total, only 200 of which were hardcover. Fine without dust jacket, as issued, lacking the publisher's plain card stock slipcase. [#025308] $45
New Rochelle, Elizabeth Press, (1972). One of an unspecified number of hardcover copies, of a total edition of 400 copies. Inscribed by the author to Joseph and Carol Bruchac in 1982, a nice association copy. Slightly spine-faded else fine in publisher's cardboard slipcase, which is near fine. [#025307] $150
New Rochelle, Elizabeth Press, (1969). His third book, poetry. Near fine in a rubbed, near fine dust jacket. [#002177] $30
Merrick, Cross-Cultural Communications, 1982. Cross-Cultural Review Chapbook #20. Illustrated by Mohawk artist Kahiones (John Fadden) and compiled by Joseph Bruchac. Initials "JB" (Joseph Bruchac) front flyleaf, and fingerprint lower rear cover; else fine in stapled wrappers. [#025313] $30
(New Rochelle), Elizabeth Press, (1979). Of a total edition of 250 copies, this is one of 100 bound in boards, printed in Italy on Magnani rag paper. This copy is warmly inscribed by the author to Joseph Bruchac in the year of publication, "in deep admiration/ a warm sky always, brother -- ." Fine in publisher's card stock slipcase. [#025310] $200
New Rochelle, Elizabeth Press, (1965). Poetry by a writer of Cherokee-French descent, also known as Gogisgi. This is his first book. Stamped as having belonged to the literary magazine Epoch. Narrow dampstaining to both spine and foredge; thus very good in stapled wrappers. Scarce. [#026836] $80
New Rochelle, Elizabeth Press, (1965). Later printing. Poetry by a writer of Cherokee-French descent, also known as Gogisgi. His first book. Inscribed by the author to Joe and Carol Bruchac in 1982, "your warmness keeps me." Small spot to front edge of front panel; else fine in stapled wrappers. An excellent association copy. [#025306] $200
New Rochelle, Elizabeth Press, (1976). Poetry, one of 300 copies. Very near fine in self-wrappers. [#025309] SOLD
NY, Harper & Row, (1973). First American edition; this is the simultaneous hardcover issue. Fine in a price-clipped dust jacket. [#001234] $35
NY, Delacorte Press, (1966). A review copy of this anthology edited and introduced by Auden. Fine in a very good dust jacket, with publisher's promotional sheet and photo laid in. [#009189] $45
NY, Random House, (1960). Several page corners turned; else fine in a lightly spine-faded dust jacket with trace wear at the spine extremities and a bit of creasing to the rear panel. [#019411] $45
Woodstock, Overlook Press, (1988). A selection of Auster's poetry, from his small press publications of the 1970s. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#911275] $100
(Barrytown), Station Hill, (1980). A small, early collection of poetry. One of 1000 copies, 43 of which were numbered and signed. This copy is unnumbered and unsigned. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#000979] $70
(Barrytown), Station Hill, (1980). An early poetry collection. One of 1000 copies, 43 of which were numbered and signed. This copy is unnumbered and unsigned. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#911270] $70
(Brewster), Parenthese, (1977). One of 750 copies of this early collection of poems, this copy inscribed by the author: "For ___ & ___ - Love, Paul." Very shallow upper corner crease; still fine in stapled wrappers and dust jacket. Illustrated by Norman Bluhm. [#911269] $800
(Brewster), Parenthese, (1977). The limited edition of this title, which had a total printing of 750 copies; this is one of only 20 numbered copies signed by the author and the illustrator. Fine in stapled wrappers and dust jacket. One of the smallest limitations of an Auster work, and extremely scarce these days. [#911002] $1,500
London, Faber and Faber, (1990). Poems, previously collected in Disappearances, and essays, mostly taken from The Art of Hunger. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#911277] $60
(Weston), Living Hand, (1974). His first book. Poetry, published as Living Hand 3, the third issue of the magazine that Auster founded and edited. Mild edge sunning and a couple of tiny spots on the rear cover; near fine in wrappers. [#911268] $200
(Berkeley), The Figures, (1976). The lettered limited edition of the second book, a collection of poetry, by the author of The New York Trilogy, among many other novels, poetry collections, essays, and screenplays. Published in an edition of 526 copies, this is Copy "R" of 26 lettered copies signed by the author. Drenttel A2. Uncommon. Fine in wrappers. [#911001] $1,250
Chapel Hill, Lillabulero Press, (1967). Number One in the Lillabulero Poetry Pamphlet Series. With poems by Banks, William Matthews and Newton Smith. Signed by Banks. One of 500 copies printed. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#911300] $300
Hanover, Granite, (1974). His second book, a poetry collection. Signed by the author. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#911305] $225
(NY), (Quest), (1969). Poetry Pamphlet Number Two. Edited and signed by Banks. With poetry by Banks, William Matthews, Peter Wild, Charles Simic, Robert Morgan and Doug Collins. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#911303] $175
Northwood Narrows, Lillabulero Press, 1969. His first solo-authored book, a poetry collection issued as Lillabulero Poetry Pamphlet Number 7. Signed by the author. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#911304] $500
(Native American)
DeKalb, Cedar Creek Press, 1980. The wrappered edition of the first book, a collection of poems, by this writer of Choctaw-English-Welsh descent. Signed by the author on the title page and additionally inscribed by him in 1984 to a well-known writer, editor and collector of Western and Native American literature. A hint of sunning; still fine. An uncommon title in any issue -- OCLC locates only 10 copies -- especially scarce signed and as an association copy. [#032808] SOLD
(n.p.), Ives Street, (1989). A short poem about the Vietnam Memorial, bound in a handsome pamphlet that resembles the monument. The author is a Vietnam vet, a poet for 40 years, a longtime banker and financial analyst, and in recent years the president of the Poetry Foundation, a position he took after the foundation received a $100 million bequest. 6" x 4". Fine. [#010333] $40
(Van Nuys), Perivale, (1983). A chapbook collecting this former Marine's poems about the war. Near fine. Barth is one of the most accomplished of the poets to have written about the war. [#010335] $25
NY, Rivers Press, 1970. His first book, a collection of poetry only issued in wrappers, in an edition of 500 copies with illustrations by Mary Miner. Precedes his second book by four years and his first book of fiction by well over a decade. Signed by the author. Fine. [#911346] $500
(Latham), Paris Review Editions, (1989). An uncommon book of poetry by a writer who is, these days, more well known for his fiction, including First Light and Through the Safety Net. Baxter's first two books, in the early 1970s, were poetry and this was his third collection of verse. Fine in wrappers. [#911351] $70
(Latham), Paris Review Editions, (1989). An uncommon book of poetry by a writer who is, these days, more well known for his fiction, including First Light and Through the Safety Net. Baxter's first two books, in the early 1970s, were poetry and this was his third collection of verse. Signed by the author in 1994 with the added sentiment: "Even a scowl is a kind of style." Fine in wrappers. [#911350] $175
(NY), New Rivers Press, 1974. The second book, a collection of poetry, by the author of First Light, and others. This is the simultaneous issue in wrappers. The total edition was 600 copies, of which 400 were issued in wrappers and 200 in cloth. Baxter's first book was a poetry collection published four years earlier. Well-known these days as a writer of fiction, his first novel wasn't published until 1987, seventeen years after his first book and thirteen years after this volume. Near fine. A scarce title in either the hardcover or softcover issue. [#006249] $125
(NY), New Rivers Press, 1974. The scarce hardcover issue of his second book, a collection of poetry. The total edition was 600 copies, of which only 200 were issued in cloth; 400 were issued in wrappers. Well-known these days as a writer of fiction and of essays on fiction, Baxter didn't publish his first novel until 1987, seventeen years after his first book (Chameleon) and thirteen years after this title. Inscribed by the author in 1982. Fine in a slightly rubbed, else fine dust jacket. [#911007] $1,000
(n.p.), Viking, (1985). The uncorrected proof copy. A well-received collection of stories, which was the author's first book from a major trade publisher, after a couple of poetry chapbooks and a story collection from a university press. Fine in wrappers. In our experience, quite an uncommon proof. [#004980] $100
(NY), MR Press, 1962. Poetry with a political edge by this activist poet, written during the volatile era of the Civil Rights Movement and the Vietnam War. Inscribed by Beecher to Will Inman, another poet known for his political and social activism: "For Will Inman/ a poet whose work I like./ John Beecher/ May 22, 1967." Owner name and phone on front flyleaf with inscription on half title; wear to cloth at corners; a near fine copy in a very good dust jacket with a couple small edge chips. A nice literary association copy. [#029630] $100
London, Faber, (1959). First British edition and first edition thus, printing the title poem plus selections from his other publications. Published in an edition of 1000 copies. Near fine in a very good, price-clipped dust jacket. [#004527] $70
NY, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1970. Review copy of this collection of new poems, many of which are autobiographical and deal directly with his life and work. Fine in a very mildly-sunned, near fine dust jacket. [#014758] $45
(Iowa City), Prairie Press, 1969. His third collection of poems, which were written contemporaneously with the poems from his first two collections. An attractive edition, as usual from this highly regarded small press. This copy is inscribed by the book's designer, Carroll Coleman in 1975. Recipients' bookplate front pastedown; a bit of sunning to the spine and top couple inches of cloth on the front; near fine, without dust jacket. [#023718] $175
(Port Townsend), (Copper Canyon Press), (1975). Inscribed by the author to another poet and novelist "with admiration and affection" in the year of publication. Fine in wrappers. [#020132] $25
Berkeley, Workingman's Press, 1975. The first and only book of poetry by this writer of Osage Sioux descent. Published by Barry Gifford and distributed by Serendipity Books. This is a review copy, with publication announcement laid in. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#025332] SOLD
[NY], Farrar, Straus & Giroux, [1983]. Galley proof for the jacket copy of Bishop's second volume of collected poems. Her earlier volume, published in 1969, won the National Book Award. One long page, approximately 23" x 6-3/4", folded in fourths; near fine. [#015485] $70
London, Cape Goliard, 1968. Of a total edition of 7750, 2750 were for sale in the U.S., of which this is one of 750 hardcover copies. Fine in a near fine acetate dust jacket. [#001273] $25
(Brunswick), (Blackberry Press/Wind River), (1978). A book of poems and Coyote stories, illustrated with line drawings by Bill Crosby. Printed in an edition of 1000 copies in wrappers. Fine. [#025336] $70
De Tille, Ljouwert, (n.d.). Probable first Dutch edition. An early collection of poetry by this Mohawk writer, with a preface by Gary Snyder. Inscribed to Joseph Bruchac by the translator Jelle Kaspersma in 1984. Fine in wrappers. [#025335] $70
(Fredonia), White Pine Press, (1990). A volume of contemporary Coyote tales -- poems and short prose pieces -- with illustrations by the author. Fine in wrappers. [#016521] $40
(Mohawk Nation), Akwesasne Notes, 1976. An early collection of poetry by this Mohawk writer, with a preface by Gary Snyder. Inscribed by the author to Joe Bruchac in 1977, a nice association copy. Fine in wrappers. [#025334] $125
(Pocket Poets Series)
(San Francisco), City Lights Books, (1970). The first book edition of this powerful anti-war poem, which was widely distributed in a number of formats at the height of the protests against the Vietnam War. Owner name. Near fine in wrappers. [#017564] $40
(Anthology)
Moorehead, Dacotah Territory, 1971. The first issue, with contributions by Tom McGrath, Robert Bly, Gene Frumkin, David Johnson, Marnie Walsh and others. Fine in stapled wrappers with a typed note signed by the editor, Mark Vinz, laid in. Cover art by Bernel Bayliss. [#026926] $40
(Poetry)
(n.p.), (n.p.), [c.1969-1971]. A small collection (10 items; 7 authors) of signed fair copy poetry and typed and autograph notes signed, solicited by a collector in the early 1970s, as follows: Philip Booth, a fair copy of "Was a Man" with an autograph note signed at the bottom of the page; Marc Connell, a typed note signed transmitting two autographs (not present); Richard Eberhart, a typed note signed soliciting information and assurances from the recipient before agreeing to sign a poem; Barbara Howes, signed fair copies of "Troy Weight Taken" and "A Night Picture of Pownal" and a signed Christmas greeting entitled "Talking to Animals;" David Ignatow, a signed fair copy of "Get the Gasworks," which Ignatow has re-titled by hand "Simultaneously;" Josephine Jacobsen, a signed fair copy of "Country Bath;" William Stafford, an autograph note signed agreeing to be part of the collection; and, lastly, a note from Thornton Wilder's sister Isabel explaining that Thornton is not well enough to participate. Most of the items are folded for mailing; else fine. [#018709] $250
Marvin, Blue Cloud Quarterly, 1978. Poems written by a young Lakota while in jail. Issued as Vol. 24, No. 1 of the Blue Cloud Quarterly. Stamp of Greenfield Review on title page. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#025342] SOLD
Buenos Aires, Gleizer, 1930. Borges' seventh book, a biography of Buenos Aires street poet Carriego. Attractively rebound in gilt-stamped quarter leather and marbled paper boards, with original wrappers (pink issue) bound in. Previous owner name on first blank; foxing to text, mostly confined to the outer pages; a very good copy. While the print run for this title is not indicated in the bibliography, earlier Borges titles had been printed in numbers ranging from 300 to 500 copies, and this likely had an extremely small printing as well. [#000994] $375
Chicago, University of Chicago Press, (2007). The issue in wrappers. Inscribed by the poet to another writer, on the dedication page, in the year of publication: "and for ___ with gratitude for your loyal friendship & for your reliably great art -- with great esteem & affection." A nice association copy. Fine. [#028394] $100
(Reno), (Morris), (1967). A poetry newsletter, devoted to individual poets. This issue has five poems by Brigham. Bess Miller Moore was from Mississippi, of Choctaw descent. She married Roy Brigham and took "besmilr brigham" as her nom de plume. She was recognized as an important woman poet in the 1960s and early 1970s, appearing in numerous anthologies and publishing a couple of collections, and then she retreated from the public eye although she continued to write. Brigham died in 2000; in 2012 a literary award was established in her name to commemorate Besmilr Brigham as "a thoroughly independent and distinct American voice" and to champion the work of other women writers, especially those not living on the coasts of the U.S. -- Brigham lived in New Mexico and Arkansas most of her life. Four stapled pages, including the cover. Printed on rectos only. Folded in half and labeled for mailing (to Theodore Enslin). Edge-tanned, with one corner hole in the last leaf, not affecting any text; very good. Very uncommon. [#031468] $100
(Laramie), Jelm Mountain Press, (1986). His fourth book, a collection of poems which, at 75 pages, is considerably more lengthy than his earlier chapbooks. Fine in wrappers. [#025346] SOLD
Detroit, Broadside Press, (1970). A review copy of this collection of poems by the first African American woman writer to win the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, for Annie Allen in 1950. Near fine in stapled wrappers, with review slip laid in. [#026691] $70
NY, Norton, (1977). Poetry. This is the hardcover issue. Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#912301] $30
(n.p.), University of Massachusetts Press, (1970). The hardcover issue of the first book by the author of Before and After, Civil Wars and others, this being a collection of poems. Small, faint spot to rear cloth, else fine in a fine, price-clipped dust jacket. [#915956] $45
(Austin), Cold Mountain, (1978). A collection of poems, with illustrations by Kahonhes (John Fadden), a Mohawk artist. This is the issue in wrappers. Signed by the author with the inscription "Peace" and his typical Kokopilli drawing. Very slight spine-sunning; else fine in wrappers. [#025365] $70
Ithaca, Ithaca House, (1971). The second book, and first regularly published volume, by this writer of Abenaki descent, who has carved out a unique place in contemporary American Indian literature as a publisher, poet, novelist, anthologist, storyteller and chronicler of traditional stories. Warmly inscribed by the author to his grandmother: "For Grandma/ For her birthday./ July 4, 1972/ Love,/ Sonny." Joseph "Sonny" Bruchac was raised by his grandparents, and his grandmother influenced his early love of reading. Some staining to front cover and some rubbing and surface peeling there. Very good in wrappers. A nice association copy. [#016536] $375
Marvin, Blue Cloud Quarterly, 1978. Poems derived from Mohegan stories and from the diary of Flying Bird, the last speaker of the Mohegan-Pequot language. Vol. 24, No. 3 of the Blue Cloud Quarterly. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#025364] $40
(Marvin), Blue Cloud Quarterly Press, (1983). A collection of poems, issued as Blue Cloud Quarterly Vol. 29, No. 1. Cover illustration by Kahionhes. Printer's note to Bruchac laid in. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#025368] SOLD
Greenfield Center, Greenfield Review, (1972). An early collection of poetry, and the first of his books to be published by Greenfield Review Press, the press he founded. Greenfield Review Chapbook #3. This copy is near fine in textured blue stapled wrappers. [#025352] $60
Greenfield Center, Greenfield Review, (1972). An early collection of poetry, and the first of his books to be published by Greenfield Review Press, the press he founded. Greenfield Review Chapbook #3. Near fine in tan stapled wrappers. [#025353] $55
Merrick, Cross-Cultural Communications, 1980. A collection of poems, Cross-Cultural Review Chapbook 10, illustrated by Kahionhes (John Fadden). This copy is inscribed by Bruchac to his parents: "Moon of Falling Leaves/ 1980/ For Dad & Mom/ Peace,/ Your Son," with his signature Kokopelli drawing. According to the text, a "translator's son" is a term used among certain of the Lakota people to refer to a person of mixed Indian and white ancestry. Bruchac's father was Slovak; his mother was English and Abenaki. Fine in wrappers. [#016549] $250
Merrick, Cross-Cultural Communications, 1980. A collection of poems, Cross-Cultural Review Chapbook 10, illustrated by Kahionhes (John Fadden). This copy is inscribed by the author to another Native American poet during the Moon of Strawberries, 1982. Several poems starred in text, else fine in stapled wrappers. A good association copy. [#025367] $150
1970. A privately distributed assemblage of the poet's verse from 1967-1970. Brutus, an exiled South African poet-activist, who had spent time in the cell next to Nelson Mandela on Robben Island and was partly responsible for South Africa being banned from the 1964 Olympics -- a sanction that helped create the strategy that eventually defeated apartheid -- was a visiting lecturer in the English Department at the University of Denver in 1970, and he circulated these 25 poems as "something personal to give to the people who have been so kind to me here...But also there is an immediacy about some of my verse...I feel strongly just now that to justify my continuing to write verse, it needs to be doing something." [As quoted in a cover letter to this collection provided by Karen C. Chapman, editor, the previous year, of Dennis Brutus: Letters to Martha and Other Poems from a South African Prison]. In other words, these poems represent Brutus' attempt, even while in exile, to keep his poetry relevant, and to continue in his role as an activist and agitator. Inscribed by Brutus: "Bob & Elizabeth Richardson. In appreciation, sincerely, Dennis Brutus, March, 1970." Also dated and initialed by Brutus, "5.14 DB." Loose sheets, with the endsheets being stationery with the watermark of the University of Denver. Chapman's cover sheet also provides a biographical sketch of Brutus. Faint sunning to the pages; else fine, and in the original clear acetate folder. We can find no evidence of any other copy of this collection surviving; a virtually unique collection of typescript poetry by a major figure in both world poetry and, in particular, the anti-apartheid movement among South African artists. A literary footnote: Robert Richardson later married Annie Dillard, a relationship engendered by her writing him a fan letter regarding his 1986 book on Henry Thoreau. [#030102] $1,000
(Paris), Falaize, (1952). An out-of-series copy of this bilingual edition of 3000 numbered copies of Wilde's poem, printed here with Camus' "L'Artiste en Prison," which delineates Wilde's journey from themes of ideal beauty to existential suffering. Inscribed by Camus (in French): "to Sylvestre,/ a remembrance of Iguape/ and with the friendly thoughts/ of Albert Camus." While context does not give explanation to the reference to Iguape, one of Camus' last stories, "The Growing Stone" -- the final story in Camus' last collection, Exile and the Kingdom -- is set in Iguape, Brazil. It has been said that this story is the clearest manifestation of Camus' ideals: in it, the protagonist sacrifices himself to help a friend, and behaves morally despite his own understanding of the absurdity of the world. Camus won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1957, the year Exile and the Kingdom was published, and the Prize committee cited his "clear-sighted earnestness [which] illuminates the problems of the human conscience in our times." As best we can tell, this is the first appearance in print of "L'Artiste en Prison," which was translated into English and published in Encounter magazine two years later. A very near fine copy in French wraps. Books inscribed by Camus are uncommon; the author died in 1960 in a car accident, at the age of 46. [#030104] $3,750
Port Townsend, Copper Canyon Press, (1976). The first book, a collection of poems, by this writer who is an enrolled member of the Eastern Band of the Cherokee tribe. This book won the Washington State Governor's First Book Award in 1976. Inscribed by the author to another Native American poet in 1977, "with great respect for your writing, your support of newer poets, and your inspiration as a Keeper of Tradition." Recipient's handmade bookplate on flyleaf; near fine in wrappers. [#025385] $100
NY, Grossman, 1973. The first book to be published by an "above-ground" publisher by this poet who was prominent in the New York City counterculture in the late Sixties. Carroll was already something of a legend before he was 18, and he had received glowing praise from even such a literary luminary as Jack Kerouac, who wrote "at 13 years of age, Jim Carroll writes better prose than 89% of the novelists working today." He was part of the social milieu that included performers like Lou Reed and the Velvet Underground and poets such as Ted Berrigan, Ron Padgett and others. It was a cultural scene heavily defined by drugs and rock and roll, and Carroll's writings comprise one of the great coming-of-age documents of the drug culture. Near fine in a near fine Larry Rivers-designed dust jacket with a small black sticker on the front flap over the price. A Viking Press catalog clipping announcing the then-forthcoming book is laid in. [#031351] $350
(n.p.), Laura A. Mendoza, [2001]. A broadside poem, issued in an edition of 150 copies, of which 75 were numbered and signed (and 35 were signed yet unnumbered). This is copy No. 75/75, and is signed by Carroll. Carroll died in 2009; this was the last work of his published in his lifetime, and this is ostensibly the last copy of it. OCLC lists only one copy in an institutional library, a remarkably small number for the author of the classic work of coming of age in the Sixties, The Basketball Diaries. 7-1/2" x 15". Fine. [#032861] SOLD
NY, Bright Lights Studio, 1968. A low budget poetry collection, produced by photocopy, printed on rectos only, with work by Carroll, Ted Berrigan, Lewis Warsh, Bernadette Mayer, Anne Waldman, Ron Padgett, and others. 8-1/2" x 11", side-stapled; no rear cover (as issued?). Smudges to front cover; a very good copy. [#032862] $150
Chicago, Big Table, (1971). The simultaneous wrappered edition of this book of poems written in celebration of the birth of his first child. Inscribed by the author to Australian poet and literary editor Thomas Shapcott. Near fine. [#023737] $60
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New Arrivals Catalog 168