Catalog 98, C-D

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52. (CARVER, Raymond). Syracuse Poems and Stories 1980. Syracuse: Syracuse University (1980). Selected and with a two-page foreword by Carver. A small pamphlet in stapled wrappers. The edition was limited to 300 numbered copies. Slightly bumped at crown; a near fine copy of a scarce item.

53. (CARVER, Raymond). When We Talk About Raymond Carver. (Layton): (Peregrine Smith) (1991). The uncorrected proof copy of this collection of talks about Carver, with such writers as Richard Ford, William Kittredge, Robert Stone, Tobias Wolff, Jay McInerney, and others. Edited by Sam Halpert. The proof includes a piece by Tess Gallagher that was withdrawn before the published version. Fine in wrappers.

54. CASTILLO, Ana. The Mixquiahuala Letters. Binghampton: Bilingual Press (1986). The simultaneous issue in wrappers of the first novel (after several poetry books) by the author of My Father was a Toltec. An epistolary novel for which the author proposes three different routes through the text, none of them in strict conformance with a straight reading. Inscribed by the author to another poet in 1987, in part: "from a less poet." Slight foredge bump; else fine in wrappers. A nice association copy of an uncommon book.

55. CHANDLER, Raymond. Typed Letter Signed. January 18, 1954. Three paragraphs in which he discusses copies of books he has that may be of interest to the recipient, presumably a collector, and his own interest in a book called They Don't Dance Much by James Ross. Several sentences discount the idea that James Ross is John Ross Macdonald, and Chandler closes: "But if I could recreate that strange sordid steamy lazy corrupt ingrown, and yet so human feeling of shabby life below the line, I shouldn't have stopped with one book, by heck." Signed, "Yours ever, Raymond Chandler." Folded vertically and horizontally for mailing; near fine. With three tiny holograph corrections. A nice letter by the author of The Big Sleep and Farewell, My Lovely, among others. Chandler, together with Dashiell Hammett, was the father of the hard-boiled mystery genre, and a letter in which he discusses other hard-boiled writing is especially attractive.

56. CHANDLER, Raymond. Typed Letter Signed. January 27, 1958. In blue type on blue personal stationery. Three paragraphs, a letter to Michael Gilbert, Chandler's lawyer and himself a mystery novelist, which discusses briefly his will and the disposition of personal letters. Much of the letter is a tangent on having become so "goddam British" in his thinking that he can no longer tolerate American speech. As to his and his wife's personal effects: "I don't like to destroy her diaries because she so often made fun of me in them. I think it would be proper for me to destroy any letters written to me by my intimate lady friends, but not mine to them." Signed, "Yours always, Ray." Folded in fourths for mailing, with several additional, and very light creases. Near fine, with several small holograph corrections. A revealing letter, beginning to set some of his affairs in order, and written the year before he died.

57. CHATWIN, Bruce. On the Black Hill. NY: Viking (1983). A review copy of the first American edition of his third book and first novel. Inscribed by the author. Upper board edges have a series of shallow dings; near fine in a fine dust jacket with author photo and publicity material laid in. Books signed by Chatwin are very scarce.

58. CLIFTON, Lucille. The Terrible Stories. Brockport: BOA Editions (1996). A review copy of the simultaneous issue in wrappers, a collection of poems by this African-American writer who is the only author to have had two collections of poetry as finalists for the Pulitzer Prize in the same year. Fine.

An Extensive Harry Crews Collection

59. CREWS, Harry. The Gospel Singer. NY: Morrow, 1968. His uncommon first novel. The usual discoloration to the endpages is very slight on this copy; there is a small spot on the foredge and mild sunning to the lower board edges; very near fine in a near fine dust jacket creased on the rear flap and with a bookstore stamp on the rear panel. The Gospel Singer had a first printing of only 4000 copies, the smallest printing of any of his trade editions.

60. -. Same title, the Dell paperback edition (NY: Dell, 1969), and the "first Canadian edition," as it was printed in Canada. Near fine in wrappers.

61. CREWS, Harry. Naked in Garden Hills. NY: Morrow, 1969. The correct first edition of Crews's second book, with white endpapers; without the dots on the copyright page; and in the first issue dust jacket, which has reviews of The Gospel Singer on the rear panel. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

62. -. Another copy. Near fine in a near fine dust jacket.

63. -. Same title, the so-called second "issue"--which is in fact simply a second printing--with dots on the copyright page, green endpapers, and in the second dust jacket with blurbs about Naked in Garden Hills on the rear panel. Fine in a very good, price-clipped dust jacket.

64. CREWS, Harry. This Thing Don't Lead to Heaven. NY: Morrow, 1970. His third book. Inscribed by the author in the year of publication: "For ____/ Who has gathered with/ us at the river, all/ affection/ Harry." Fine in a near fine dust jacket.

65. -. Another copy, unsigned. Fine in a near fine dust jacket.

66. -. Another copy. Bookstore stamp on half title; near fine in dust jacket.

67. CREWS, Harry. Karate is a Thing of the Spirit. NY: Morrow, 1971. His fourth novel. Fine in a fine, price-clipped dust jacket and signed by the author. A very nice copy of what is generally considered one of his best books.

68. -. Another copy, unsigned. Blended dampstaining to extreme lower boards and jacket; still about near fine in a very good, price-clipped dust jacket.

69. -. Same title, the Pocket Book edition (NY: Pocket Books, 1972). Near fine in wrappers.

70. -. Same title, the first British edition (London: Secker & Warburg, 1972). Fine in a very near fine dust jacket with trace wear at the spine extremities.

71. CREWS, Harry. Car. NY: Morrow, 1972. His fifth book, and one of his scarcest; a hilarious and grotesque novel about a man who sets out to eat a car, bumper to bumper. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

72. -. Same title, the first British edition (London: Secker & Warburg, 1973). Fine in a rubbed, near fine dust jacket. Signed by the author.

73. -. Same title, the first Pocket Book edition (NY: Pocket Books, 1973). Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers.

74. CREWS, Harry. The Hawk is Dying. NY: Knopf, 1973. Fine in a near fine dust jacket.

75. -. Another copy. Remainder mark; else fine in a near fine dust jacket with "25" written on the front panel.

76. -. Same title, the first Pocket Book edition (NY: Pocket Books, 1974). Signed by the author. Fine in wrappers.

77. -. Same title, the first British edition (London: Secker & Warburg, 1974). Tiny nick to lower board edge; else fine in a very good dust jacket with a small tear but a heavy crease to the lower rear panel.

78. CREWS, Harry. The Gypsy's Curse. NY: Knopf, 1974. A novel about a deformed, deaf mute circus performer who specializes in feats of hand-balancing. A bizarre, moving and, as usual, lucidly written novel from a writer who is redefining Southern grotesque. Becoming quite scarce, particularly in nice shape, this copy is fine in a fine dust jacket.

79. -. Another copy. Fine in a very near fine dust jacket.

80. -. Same title, the first British edition (London: Secker & Warburg, 1975). Fine in a fine dust jacket.

81. CREWS, Harry. A Feast of Snakes. NY: Atheneum, 1976. Crews switched publishers for this book, and it is less common than some of his other titles from the same period. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

82. -. Another copy. Near fine in a dust jacket with more than the usual amount of "oranging" to the flaps from the colored endpapers.

83. -. Same title, the first Ballantine Books edition (NY: Ballantine, 1978). Fine in wrappers.

84. CREWS, Harry. A Childhood: The Biography of a Place. NY: Harper & Row (1978). The uncorrected proof copy of this highly praised memoir. One light corner crease, else fine in wrappers.

85. -. Same title, the trade edition. Signed by the author. Tiny nick to lower board edge; still fine in a near fine dust jacket.

86. -. Another copy of the trade edition, unsigned. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

87. -. Same title, the first British edition (London: Secker & Warburg, 1979). Fine in a fine dust jacket.

88. CREWS, Harry. Blood and Grits. NY: Harper & Row (1979). A collection of essays, most of which appeared in Esquire magazine in a column Crews wrote under the same title. Fine in a very near fine dust jacket.

89. -. Another copy. Fine in a very good dust jacket.

90. -. Same title, the first Perennial Library edition (NY: Harper & Row, 1988). Fine in wrappers.

91. CREWS, Harry. The Enthusiast. (n.p.): Palaemon Press (1981). Crews's first limited edition. Of a total edition of 200 copies, this is one of 150 numbered copies signed by the author. Trace wear to the boards at the spine extremities; else fine, without dust jacket, as issued.

92. CREWS, Harry. Florida Frenzy. Gainesville: U. Presses of Florida (1982). A collection of essays and short fiction pieces, not issued in hardcover. Fine in wrappers and signed by the author.

93. -. Another copy, unsigned. Previous owner inscription; near fine in wrappers.

94. CREWS, Harry. Two by Crews. Northridge: Lord John, 1984. Of a total edition of 226 copies, this is one of 200 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine without dust jacket, as issued.

95. CREWS, Harry. All We Need of Hell. NY: Harper & Row (1987). Fine in a fine dust jacket and signed by the author.

96. -. Another copy, unsigned. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

97. -. Same title, the first Perennial Library edition (NY: Harper & Row, 1988). Fine in wrappers.

98. CREWS, Harry. The Knockout Artist. NY: Harper & Row (1988). Uncorrected proof copy of this novel about a boxer, which combines the toughness and sweetness, as well as the humor, that Crews is known for. This is the first issue, shot from typescript and paginated to 382. Near fine in yellow wrappers.

99. -. Same title, the second issue of the proof, typeset and paginated to 247. Fine in tan wrappers.

100. -. Same title, the trade edition. Fine in a fine dust jacket and signed by the author.

101. -. Another copy of the trade edition, unsigned. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

102. -. Same title, the first Perennial Library edition (NY: Harper & Row, 1989). Fine in wrappers.

103. CREWS, Harry. Body. NY: Poseidon (1990). Fine in a fine dust jacket, and signed by the author.

104. -. Another copy, unsigned. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

105. -. Same title, the limited edition (n.p.: Ultramarine Press, 1990). Of a total edition of 50 copies, this is one of 40 copies quarterbound in leather and signed by the author. A long-awaited volume which, although printed from first edition sheets, was nearly five years in the making. A fine copy.

106. -. Same title, the wrappered issue of the first Touchstone edition (NY: Simon & Schuster, 1992). Fine in wrappers and signed by the author.

107. CREWS, Harry. Madonna at Ringside. Northridge: Lord John, 1991. Of a total edition of 301 copies, this is one of 275 numbered copies signed by the author. Fine without dust jacket, as issued.

108. CREWS, Harry. Scar Lover. NY: Poseidon (1992). Another venture into the unique, bizarre and tender world that Crews has mapped out in his fiction for over a quarter century. Fine in a fine dust jacket and signed by the author.

109. -. Same title, the uncorrected proof copy. Fine in wrappers.

110. CREWS, Harry. The Mulching of America. NY: Simon & Schuster (1995). The advance reading copy. Fine in wrappers, and signed by the author.

111. -. Same title, the trade edition. Fine in a fine dust jacket, and signed by the author.

112. CREWS, Harry. Classic Crews. NY: Poseidon (1993). A Crews "Reader," combining two of his early novels, Car and The Gypsy's Curse, with his highly acclaimed memoir--Childhood, The Biography of a Place--and three essays. Fine in wrappers.

113. CREWS, Harry. On Being a Southerner. (n.p.: n.p., n.d.). ORIGINAL RIBBON-COPY TYPESCRIPT. Five pages, an apparently unpublished essay, or talk, on the subject of the stereotypes associated with the South versus its actual diversity, and a homage to the values that are shared by Southerners. Inscribed at the end of the text by Crews: "To ____,/ In honor of/ Charleston and the deep/ South./ Best/ Harry Crews." Fine. We have seen no other manuscript material by Crews offered for sale in the past.

114. (CREWS, Harry). Various Articles in Playboy. (Chicago): (Playboy) (1976-1990).

a. "Going Down in Valdeez." February, 1975. Fine.

b. "A Walk in the Country." April, 1975. Near fine.

c. "Charles Bronson Ain't No Pussycat." October, 1975. Near fine.

d. "A Feast of Snakes." July, 1976. Fine.

e. "Carny." September, 1976. Includes excerpts from Kurt Vonnegut's Slapstick. Fine.

115. (CREWS, Harry). HARGRAVES, Michael. Harry Crews: A First Bibliography. San Francisco, 1981. One of 200 numbered copies of the first edition, with addenda sheet laid in. The book has since been updated in a second edition, but still a useful bibliographic reference. Fine in stapled wrappers.

116. -. Another copy. Owner signature, and lacking the addenda sheet; else fine.

117. (CREWS, Harry). Fall Fiction from Poseidon. (n.p.): Poseidon Press (1990). An advance reading excerpt printing portions of Body by Crews, Two Girls, Fat and Thin by Mary Gaitskill, and Spider by Patrick McGrath. Fine in wrappers.

118. CROWLEY, John. Love and Sleep. NY: Bantam (1994). The second book in the projected and ambitious tetralogy that began with Aegypt, which was nominated for the World Fantasy Award and was selected as one of David Pringle's 100 best fantasy novels of all time. Crowley is also the author of the Little, Big, which won the World Fantasy Award and was also chosen as one of Pringle's 100 best. One of his other novels, Engine Summer, was selected by Pringle for his list of the 100 best science fiction novels ever, and three of his six novels also were chosen by Yale literary critic Harold Bloom for his controversial list of the works comprising "the Western canon." An important author who is still relatively little-known outside the field of science fiction and fantasy, except among the cognoscenti of contemporary literature. Fine in a fine dust jacket and signed by the author.

119. CRUMLEY, James. The Last Good Kiss. NY: Random House (1978). His third book, second mystery, written in hardboiled style but with a comic edge that predates such popular contemporary novelists as Carl Hiaasen. Remainder mark; else fine in a fine dust jacket and signed by the author.

120. D'AMBROSIO, Charles. The Point. Boston: Little Brown (1995). His first book, a collection of stories. The author won the 1993 Aga Khan fiction prize. Remainder mark; else fine in a fine dust jacket and signed by the author.

121. DANIEL, David. The Heaven Stone. NY: St. Martin's (1994). The author's first mystery, winner of an in-house prize given by St. Martin's Press. Signed by the author in the month of publication. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

122. DANIELS, Kate. The White Wave. (Pittsburgh): U. of Pittsburgh Press (1984). A collection of poetry that won the 1983 Agnes Lynch Starrett Poetry Prize. This is the simultaneous issue in wrappers. Signed by the author and additionally inscribed to another poet in the year of publication. Fine.

123. DE BERNIÈRES, Louis. Corelli's Mandolin. NY: Pantheon (1994). The advance reading copy of the American edition of his most recent book, published to enormous critical acclaim on both sides of the Atlantic. Fine in wrappers and publisher's slipcase, and signed by the author.

124. DELILLO, Don. White Noise. (n.p.): (Viking) (1985). The advance reading copy of DeLillo's National Book Award-winning novel, in which characters search for safety amid love, family, and the technological conveniences that are carriers of both comfort and a seeping death. This title brought DeLillo comparisons to Norman Mailer, Thomas Pynchon and Laurie Anderson. Fine in wrappers.

125. DELILLO, Don. The Day Room. NY: Knopf, 1987. DeLillo's first play, in which the figure and ground of unreality and reality repeatedly reverse. Originally published in American Theater in 1986. Fine in a fine dust jacket, and signed by the author. Considerably less common than his novels, especially signed.

126. DELILLO, Don. Mao II. (NY): Viking (1991). Winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award. Signed by the author in the year of publication. Slight corner bump; else fine in a fine dust jacket.

127. DELILLO, Don. Underworld. (NY): Scribner (1997). His most recent novel, his thirteenth book, and his third to be nominated for The National Book Award (along with Libra and White Noise). A massive book, which received extraordinary reviews from every quarter, more than living up to its publisher's hype, and confirming DeLillo at the front rank of contemporary American writers. Fine in a fine dust jacket, and signed by the author.

128. -. Another copy. Light corner bumping; else fine in a fine dust jacket and signed by the author.

129. -. Same title. One of an unspecified number of copies signed by the author on a tipped-in leaf. The dust jacket differs from the jacket of the trade edition by having "Special Signed Copy: Not For Sale" printed on the rear panel in place of the bar code, and there is no price on the front flap. Slight corner bumping; else fine in like dust jacket.

130. DEXTER, Pete. The Paperboy. NY: Random House (1995). A highly acclaimed novel by the author of the National Book Award-winning Paris Trout, God's Pocket, and others. Fine in a fine dust jacket and signed by the author.

131. DIDION, Joan. The Last Thing He Wanted. NY: Knopf, 1996. The advance reading copy of the latest novel by the author of Slouching Toward Bethlehem and Play It As It Lays, among others. Fine in wrappers and publisher's cardstock slipcase. Signed by the author.

132. DOCTOROW, E.L. The Waterworks. NY: Random House (1994). Set in New York City in the 1870s, the novel is both a story in itself and also a portrait of New York City at a particular moment in time. Like Gore Vidal with his series of historical novels of the American political experience, Doctorow has been creating a history of New York in fiction, from Ragtime and Billy Bathgate to Worlds' Fair and The Book of Daniel. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket with a small crease on the front flap.

133. DORRIS, Michael. A Yellow Raft in Blue Water. NY: Henry Holt (1987). His highly praised first novel. Dorris was a professor at Dartmouth College and responsible for starting the Native American Studies Program there and was of Irish, French and Modoc descent himself. He was married to writer Louise Erdrich, and the two co-wrote several books, and claimed in interviews to have collaborated on all their books, including her bestselling and award-winning novels. This, his first novel, was published to excellent reviews and his book of nonfiction, The Broken Cord, won the National Book Critics Circle Award. Fine in a fine dust jacket, and signed by the author.

134. DORRIS, Michael. Cloud Chamber. (NY): Scribner (1997). His final novel. One of an undetermined number of copies of the trade edition issued as a "Special Signed Copy." Signed by the author on the front flyleaf. Fine in a near fine dust jacket that differs from that of the trade edition by the omission of a price on the front flap and the statement of "Special Signed Copy: Not For Sale" on the rear panel in place of the bar code. Hauntingly blurbed by the publisher with a quote from one of Dorris' characters: "The dead are never really quite gone from our family. The influence of their deeds and personalities is always pushing us and nudging us one way or the other."

135. DOSS, James D. The Shaman Laughs. NY: St. Martin's (1995). Second mystery by the author of The Shaman Sings, featuring Ute Indian policeman Charlie Moon and Daisy Perika, an elderly Ute shaman. Fine in a fine dust jacket, and signed by the author.

136. DOUBIAGO, Sharon. Hard Country. Minneapolis: West End Press, 1982. Apparently the author's first book, an epic poem (260+ pages) which is inscribed by the author to another poet: "For your great inspiration through the years. For history. For poetry..." Two holograph corrections to the text in the author's hand. Blurbs by Carolyn Forché, Thomas McGrath, and Meridel le Seuer. Issued in wrappers, with no indication of there having been a hardcover edition. Covers rubbed; near fine.

137. DUBUS, Andre. Meditations from a Movable Chair. [NY: Knopf, 1998.] A collection of the publisher's "dead matter" for the author's most recent book, a collection of essays. Consists of five separate versions of the text, including two sets of page proofs marked "Master"--"1st pass" and "2nd pass"; one set of page proofs marked "Author - 1st pass"; one set of revised page proofs, with extensive annotations by the author and copy editor; and a set of sheets marked "setting ms." with extensive copy editing notations. Each set has been signed by the author. Dubus's books, since they typically consist like this one of short, previously published pieces, have no single "manuscript," per se; these are as close as one gets to a single, coherent manuscript. All sets show slight wear; near fine.

138. DUFRESNE, John. The Way that Water Enters Stone. NY: Norton (1991). The author's first book, a collection of stories, with blurbs by Rick Bass, Lee K. Abbott, James W. Hall, Lewis Nordan and others. Fine in a fine dust jacket and signed by the author.

139. DUFRESNE, John. Louisiana Power and Light. NY: Norton (1994). His highly praised second book, first novel. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket with an "autographed" label on the front panel and an antitheft device on the verso.

140. -. Another copy. Fine in a fine dust jacket and signed by the author.

141. DUFRESNE, John. Love Warps the Mind a Little. NY: Norton (1997). The most recent novel by the author of Louisiana Power and Light and The Way That Water Enters Stone. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket with an author photo laid in.

142. DUNNING, John. Deadline. Huntington Beach: Cahill, 1995. The reissue of this novel, originally published in paperback, this being the first hardcover edition in the U.S. (A Gollancz hardcover was done in England). One of 200 numbered copies signed by the author. Small spot to foredge; else a fine copy in slipcase. With a new introduction by the author that discusses the genesis of the book and the history of its original publication. Laid in is a copy of The Torch Passes, a poem in stapled wrappers and also issued along with this title as a limited edition of 200 copies signed by the author.

143. DUNNING, John. Bookscout. (Minneapolis): (Dinkytown Antiquarian Books) (1998). The first separate appearance of a short story that appeared first in the magazine This Week in Denver and then in the anthology Ten Tales. One of 3000 numbered copies issued for sale at six different book fairs. This copy bears the imprint of the 1998 Twin Cities Boookfair. Fine in self-wrappers, and signed by the author.

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