Catalog 169

All books are first printings of first editions or first American editions unless otherwise noted.

121.
(Superheroes Archive)
1986-1993. An archive of over 400 items pertaining to the Ninja Turtles, including original manuscripts for comic strips, newspapers, photographs, and artwork. From the collection of Bram Stoker Award winning horror writer Stanley Wiater, who was hired in the early 1990s by Mirage Studios (the studio of TMNT creators Peter Laird and Kevin Eastman) to write original comic book scripts, published by Archie Comics. Wiater also wrote some of the storyline for the daily newspaper comic strip, illustrated by Dan Berger, that appeared in roughly 450 newspapers. He then authored The Official Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Treasury: the research and materials from that project are included in this archive. Highlights include: the original typewritten scripts for ten TMNT comic strips; over 50 original daily comic strips; over 200 photographs of models for the characters, action figures, and comic book covers; the manuscript, proposal and notes for the Treasury; correspondence between the series writers and artists; contracts and agreements; proposals for branding campaigns; character guidelines; and storyline development pitches. A more detailed inventory is available on request. [#033054] $6,000
122.
Boston, Little Brown, (1959). Thurber's memoir of Harold Ross, founder and editor of The New Yorker, with illustrations by the author. Ross founded the magazine in 1925 and served as editor-in-chief until his death in 1951. Thurber began his career with The New Yorker in 1927; he died just two years after this publication. Inscribed by Thurber on the flyleaf, and with a drawing of a dog on the pastedown, signed underneath it "th." Thurber's sight was failing by this time, and his lettering is large and rough; he seldom illustrated his inscriptions by this time, because of his poor eyesight. A good inscription, from late in the artist and writer's life. Spine gilt faded; near fine in a very good dust jacket with modest edge wear and a couple of small stains. [#033198] $750
123.
(NY), HarperCollins, (1994). Updike provides a 5-page introduction, entitled "The Spirit of the Game," to this compendium of articles and photographs. After Updike died in 2009, Golf Digest declared, "If golfers were allowed to vote for the Nobel Prize in literature, John Updike would have won it..." This copy of Golf bears the bookplate of the Brae Burn Country Club's 50th annual Men's Member-Guest Tournament and is inscribed by Updike in the same month: "For ___ ___/ warm regards -- be happy and healthy! John Updike/ 7/29/97." Brae Burn was one of the courses that Updike played with some frequency. Oversized; fine in a fine dust jacket. Rare signed. [#030288] $500
124.
(n.p.), King Ranch Edition, 1972. The limited edition. Copy 54 of 1000 (or, likely, fewer) numbered copies produced for the King Ranch, at the time reputed to be the largest ranch in the world, and signed by the author. Additionally, this copy is inscribed by Vavra to the writer Peter Matthiessen: "For Peter - who at one time was also under the spell of the bulls of Iberia. Thanks again for your help with my new book. It would be great to have you at the ranch - imagine the ¡oles¡. All best/ Robert/ April 23, 1996." Foreword by James A. Michener. Clothbound; mild spine fade; else fine in a near fine slipcase with several lamination creases to the pictorial covers. The copyright page has blacked out information covered with a pasted-on label, suggesting this edition was made up of copies from the Seville, Spain edition which, although identified as a signed limited issue was not signed. It is doubtful that there were actually 1000 copies of this edition produced, or distributed: the book seems to be fairly scarce. A nice association copy. [#029011] $500
125.
NY, Knopf, 2009. The uncorrected proof copy. Inscribed by the author "For ____ - with great pleasure in meeting you after reading your blog! My best wishes, Abraham Verghese 2/11/09," the month of publication. Cutting for Stone was well-received, a bestseller, and made numerous "Best of" lists. The proof is uncommon, not to be confused with the advance reading copy in pictorial wrappers. Near fine in wrappers. [#033050] $150
126.
NY, Farrar Straus Giroux, (1981). The uncorrected proof copy of this collection of poetry by Walcott, a West Indian author of poetry and plays who won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1992. This copy is inscribed by Walcott to the poet Mark Strand: "To Mark - continuing strength/ Derek." With Strand's ownership signature beneath. One of the poems in this collection, "Piano Practice" is individually dedicated to Strand. It is printed here in the proof as it appeared in The Kenyon Review in 1980, but changes were made between this and the published version, and laid in here are two photocopies of the proof version showing two versions of Walcott's revisions (in the hand of a copy editor?). The photocopies are stapled and folded in thirds; the proof is near fine in wrappers. Strand was Poet Laureate of the U.S. the year Walcott won his Nobel Prize; Strand also won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1999, for his collection Blizzard of One, which contained the poem "The View," dedicated to Walcott. A superb literary association between two of the preeminent poets of the 20th century. [#033199] $1,500
127.
NY, Random House, (1966). An extra-annotated copy: inscribed by Wasserman, "To --- ---, a fellow quixotick -- with appreciation, Dale Wasserman, in 1968. Wasserman, who had had success on Broadway with an adaptation of Ken Kesey's One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest in 1963, wrote the book for Man of La Mancha which opened off Broadway in 1965 and moved to Broadway in 1966, where it won the Tony Award for best musical. Tipped into this copy is a plethora of Quixotic ephemera, as well as four typed letters signed from Wasserman. There is also a photo of a Cervantes-themed bracelet, which the recipient had sent to Wasserman, and which Wasserman mounted and photographed. The four letters span 1968-1969. In one, Wasserman notes: "It amuses me, the way The Impossible Dream has swept the world, gone into so many languages and been put to so many uses. For most often it's used wrongly, in a perversion of its meaning..." The owner has rather compulsively annotated not only the text of the book, and the added articles, reviews, and illustrations; he has also annotated Wasserman's letters. Binding broken from all the ephemera laid in. Thus a good copy, with the dust jacket absent but the jacket flaps preserved and pasted to the endpages. A unique copy. [#033200] $750
128.
NY, Harper & Row, (1977). A collection of essays spanning his career, with a foreword written expressly for this volume. Inscribed by the author to a neighbor in Maine: "For ____/ with love from/ Andy." ("Andy" being White's nickname, from college.) Boards mildly splayed and light foxing to page edges; near fine in a very good dust jacket with an externally tape-repaired tear at the lower outer corner of the rear panel. [#033201] $750
129.
Easthampton, Warwick Press, 2000. A limited edition chapbook printing two poems, one each by Wilbur and Hall, in celebration of a joint reading by the poets in 2000. Copy No. 89 of 140 copies, signed by Wilbur and Hall and also signed by Jack Kelleher, who organized the reading, and by Carol Blinn, the book's designer. The poems are "The Beautiful Horses" by Hall and "Crow's Nests" by Wilbur. Handsewn in wrappers. Fine, with publisher's envelope. [#033051] SOLD
130.
NY, Scribner, (1984). An autograph letter signed to Peter Matthiessen, written in 1989 and addressed, "Dearest Peter," asking if he would sign her copy of The Snow Leopard, which she has been rereading and adding, "It is a gift to meet you, to have shared these two evenings in Jackson Hole. Bless you. You inspire me." Folded in thirds; fine. Laid into Matthiessen's copy of Williams' first solo book, Pieces of White Shell, which won the Southwestern Book Award. Modestly foxed; a near fine copy, lacking the dust jacket. [#032544] $450
131.
NY, Farrar Straus Giroux, (1981). The book is inscribed by the author to Peter [Matthiessen] in 1982, and with a full-page typed letter signed laid in, which discusses both Matthiessen's writing and his own, including Poppa John, "a recent whipping boy for the Eastern press..." Letter folded, with some small stains. The book is near fine in a very good, spine-faded dust jacket, with one edge tear to the upper rear panel. [#032547] $300
132.
NY, Harcourt Brace, 1921. The first American edition of this early collection of short fiction, in which Woolf explores the stream of consciousness technique that she used to great effect in later novels. One of only 1500 copies, this copy in the black cloth binding. Slight foxing to cloth; near fine in a very near fine, price-clipped dust jacket, professionally, preemptively strengthened on the verso along the folds. A beautiful copy; easily the most attractive one we've seen. [#023688] $2,500
E-list: William S. Burroughs New Arrivals