Catalog 168

All books are first printings of first editions or first American editions unless otherwise noted.

32.
NY, Vintage, (1986). The uncorrected proof copy of his breakthrough book, the first in his Pulitzer Prize-winning Bascombe series. Signed by the author. Published as a paperback original: proofs in the Vintage Contemporaries series seem to have been done in much smaller quantities than those of their counterparts slated for hardcover publication, and seem to have received much more limited distribution: many review venues -- including newspapers and magazines -- have policies precluding the reviewing of paperback publications. Buckle to front spine fold, possibly from binding; very near fine in wrappers. Review slip laid in, asking the reader to disregard "large, unnumbered spaces" on more than a dozen pages, which "will not appear in the finished book." Scarce signed. [#914961] $500
33.
Elmwood, Raven Editions, 1988. One of only 14 presentation copies of this roughly 10,000 word essay on the arc of Ford's mother's life and their relationship, a shorter version of which had appeared in Harper's. Issued in a total edition of 140 copies, only 40 of which were hardbound: 26 lettered copies and 14 presentation copies. This, Copy No. 3 of the 14 presentation copies, is signed by Ford, and with a frontispiece by noted artist Russell Chatham, hand-shaded and signed by Chatham as well. Although not called for, this copy is signed twice by Ford, once on the colophon and once on the half-title. Designed and printed letterpress by Carol Blinn at Warwick Press. Hand-bound in quarter leather and decorated paste paper over boards. Nearly imperceptible bowing to boards; very near fine. [#028916] $2,000
34.
Christchurch, NZ, The Edge Press, (1971). The premiere issue of this literary magazine, notable for Richard Ford's second appearance in print. Signed by Ford. It's easy to imagine that this short-lived literary periodical, published in New Zealand, may turn out to be one of the most elusive of Ford's appearances. Fine in stapled wrappers. [#912520] $475
35.
(n.p.), Mirage Enterprises and Bona Fide Films, 2002. The revised shooting script for Minghella's screenplay based on Frazier's novel. 3-hole paper, claspbound in blue folder with acetate cover. White pages revised July 9; pink pages revised July 22. July 9 memo regarding the revisions bound in. Additionally laid in are bradbound revisions in white, pink and blue from July 9, July 22, August 6, and August 18, again with a bound-in memo. The script is fine; the laid in revisions are near fine. A revealing view of the work in progress. Minghella won an Oscar for directing The English Patient, and was nominated for Oscars for Best Adapted screenplay for that film and for The Talented Mister Ripley. [#912588] SOLD
36.
NY, Harper, (2014). First thus, Russell's graphic adaptation of Gaiman's novel in one volume, with additional material not included in the 2014 two-volume issue as a graphic novel. Copy 842 of 1600 numbered copies signed by Gaiman. Includes the complete contents of the two-volume edition, as well as previously unpublished notes by Gaiman and Russell, and a number of reproductions of sketches for the work by Russell and other artists who worked on the project -- 32 additional pages in all. The Graveyard Book, a children's tale originally published in 2008 prior to its publication as a graphic novel, was the first book to win both the Newbery Medal and its U.K equivalent, the Carnegie Medal. Fine in a fine slipcase and publisher's cardboard box. [#032872] SOLD
37.
(London), Faber and Faber, (2004). A limited edition with text by Alex Garland and woodcuts by his father, Nicholas Garland. Of a total edition of 310 copies, this is Copy No. 43 of 50 copies signed by both Garlands and including a limited edition woodcut, also one of 50, signed by Nicholas Garland. Approximately 18" x 12-1/2". An elaborate production of this novel by the author of The Beach and The Tesseract, and the screenwriter for the acclaimed film 28 Days Later. Fine in a very slightly dusty but still fine clamshell box. [#914499] $500
38.
Decatur, Wisteria Press, 1995. Copy "B" of 26 lettered copies, of a total edition of 297 copies. Signed by Kaye Gibbons and by the artist, Barry Moser, who provides the frontispiece. There is an additional signed frontispiece engraving laid into the book. Quarterbound in leather, with leather foredges; fine, in a handmade clamshell box by Kannex Fung, featuring dried leaves under plastic, and signed by Fung. [#912598] SOLD
39.
NY, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, (1974). The only children's book by the author of such novels as The Princess Bride and Marathon Man. Inscribed by Goldman in 1988: "____ - There's no reason for you to be encumbered with this, my only children's book, except I kind of like it and hope you do too. God bless/ Bill." Fine in a very good dust jacket with several edge tears and a heavy vertical crease near the front spine fold. This is the publisher's reinforced library binding of burgundy cloth stamped in silver -- not, however, an ex-library copy: simply the issue created by the publisher for sale to libraries and as such uncommon without library markings. Illustrated by Errol Le Cain, a Kate Greenaway Award winner, and a fairly early book for him. [#026741] $575
40.
NY, Self-Published, (1979). Issue #18 of the pseudonymous Green's self-published newspaper, Newspaper, which he founded in 1957 to extol the writing of William Gaddis, whose first novel appeared in 1955 and was dismissed by critics: "jack green" created "newspaper," and wrote as a literary critic, praising Gaddis' work, and his efforts are believed to have been the spur for the new edition of The Recognitions published in 1962. Gaddis' novel eventually made Time magazine's list of the 100 best novels from 1923 to 2005. Speculation over the years had "green" as actually being Gaddis, or Thomas Pynchon, or "Wanda Tinasky" -- a theorized Pynchon pseudonym -- or all of the above. In actuality he was Christopher Reid, the son of both a novelist and of an editor at a New York publishing house, who dropped out of an insurance industry job to become a freelance writer and editor, and advocate of Gaddis's writing. This issue, published in 1979, is a very late issue in the history of newspaper, and is quite uncommon. Three sheets of 8-1/2 " x 11" paper, folded in half and side-stapled to make a 12-page periodical. Slight rust to staples; still fine. [#032873] $150
41.
(Haiti)
NY, Farrar & Rinehart, (1944). A novel of Haiti by these two Haitian brothers, which won a prize in the Second Latin American literature contest sponsored by Farrar & Rinehart. Inscribed by Thoby-Marcelin to Barbara Howes in 1971. Poet Barbara Howes edited From the Green Antilles, one of the first anthologies of Caribbean literature to appear in the U.S., in 1966. She was married to the poet William Jay Smith. This book has the Howes/Smith bookplate on the front pastedown. Translated by Edward Larocque Tinker, who designed and illustrated the book, and who provides an introduction to it entitled "Haitian Background," explaining both the history and the metaphysics of Haitian religious beliefs. Fine in a good, price-clipped dust jacket threatening to split at the flap folds. An important book, and especially scarce signed. [#018565] $450
42.
(Haiti)
Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1951. Their second collaboration, inscribed by Thoby-Marcelin to Barbara Howes in 1971. Howes/Smith bookplate front pastedown, causing offsetting to flyleaf at inscription. Introduction by Edmund Wilson, with Howes' pencilled markings in the text of the introduction; spine cloth faded; very good in a very good, price-clipped dust jacket with several small edge chips. Uncommon, especially signed. [#018567] $350
43.
NY, Atlantic Monthly, (2002). The limited edition of Harrison's memoir. Copy 17 of 250 numbered copies Signed by the author. This copy is additionally inscribed by Harrison, "To my friend Larry." Fine in a near fine slipcase. Based on the source of the books we received this from (on Long Island), and the time frame of one of the inscriptions (a reference to "35 years," we speculate that Harrison's friendship with Larry could date back to his time at SUNY Stony Brook. [#032874] SOLD
44.
NY, Grove Press, (2008). The uncorrected proof copy. Inscribed by the author: "To my dear friend Larry. What is it? 35 years? Love, Jim." A few small stains to the covers; near fine in wrappers. [#032875] SOLD
45.
NY, Grove Press, (2011). Harrison's take on the detective story, featuring Detective Sunderson and his 16 year-old sidekick. Inscribed by the author: "To Larry & Rochelle/ a naughty novel/ Jim." Fine in a fine dust jacket. [#032876] SOLD
46.
Garden City, Doubleday, 1972. Himes's autobiography, inscribed to Ossie Davis, who co-wrote and directed the 1970 film Cotton Comes to Harlem, based on Himes's novel of the same name. Inscribed: "For Ossie Davis, Salut et Fraternite/ Chester Himes." Himes's series of hard-boiled crime novels featuring Gravedigger Jones and Coffin Ed Johnson used the genre to explore and reveal little-known aspects of the black culture of postwar Harlem in much the same way that Walter Mosley's novels have done for the black subculture of postwar Los Angeles. Because Himes lived most of his adult life in France, books signed by him are relatively uncommon. Significant association copies of books by Himes are genuinely rare. Here offered together with an original photograph of Davis on the set of the film, with actors Godfrey Cambridge and Raymond St. Jacques. The book is stamped "Property of Ossie & Ruby Davis" on the first blank, below the inscription; a near fine copy in a supplied, near fine dust jacket. The 5-1/2" x 7" silver gelatin print of Davis by John Rodriguez is dated 8/1969 and is matted and framed. [#032877] $1,250
47.
(Horror)
NY, Dell/Abyss, 1991-1996. Sixteen paperback titles in Dell's Abyss Horror paperback line: fourteen are first printings; fourteen are review copies; all but one are fine. As follows:1991 - Brian Hodge, Nightlife; Kelley Wilde, Mastery; 1992 - Lisa Tuttle, Lost Futures; Dennis Etchison, editor, Metahorror; Mark Morris, Stitch; Jessica Amanda Salmonson, Anthony Shriek; 1993 - Kelley Wilde, Angel Kiss; Gail Petersen, The Making of a Monster; Melanie Tem and Nancy Holder, Making Love; Tanith Lee, Heart Beast;1995 - Melanie Tem, Desmodus; Douglas Clegg, The Children's Hour;1996 - Kristine Kathryn Rusch, The Devil's Churn; Nancy Holder and Melanie Tem, Witch-Light; Ellen Datlow, editor, Twists of the Tale. All but Anthony Shriek and Making Love have review material laid in. All but Darker Saints and Heart Beast are first printings (they are second printings, but have review material laid in). The Children's Hour has the stamp of another author on the title page. All but Making Love are fine in wrappers (Making Love has one tiny corner crease and is very near fine). The Dell/Abyss imprint was created to elevate the horror genre to be "cutting edge psychological horror" and "the best, most innovative dark fiction available," according to the publisher's mission statement. Stephen King provided an unsolicited blurb for the entire series, the first time he had blurbed an entire series, and the first time he had asked to be allowed to provide a blurb, rather than being asked for one. The imprint eventually published over 40 titles before folding. This lot represents something under half the titles produced in the lifetime of the imprint. Lot price for 16 titles. [#031176] $175
48.
NY, Random House, (1959). The second book by one of the co-founders, with Peter Matthiessen, of The Paris Review. Inscribed by Humes to Matthiessen: "For Peter - father of this modern novelist -- with fondest regards. H.L. Humes/ Sept. 16, 1959/ New York." Humes and Matthiessen had had a noted falling out in the early days of the Review, but appear to have put it behind them by this time. By the year of this inscription, Matthiessen had had two novels published and was publishing his first book of nonfiction, Wildlife in America. Foxed and musty; very good in a very good dust jacket. A notable association copy. [#032484] SOLD
49.
NY, Morrow, (1985). A hardcover advance issue of the trade edition of his sixth novel, the basis for the 1999 film, for which Irving wrote the Academy Award-winning screenplay. Signed by Irving on the front flyleaf. Fine in a fine glassine dustwrapper, as issued. These books were given out by the publisher to sales reps and customers prior to publication and presumably prior to the printing of the final dust jacket. Uncommon now, especially with the glassine jacket intact. [#911600] SOLD
50.
(n.p.), (n.p.), 2000. An early, tapebound typescript of this novel that was published in July, 2001. No publisher indicated, suggesting this was an early agent's copy, or some other kind of copy prepared prior to the publisher issuing any version of it. Double-spaced, double-sided, 507 pages. "Revised: December 11, 2000" printed on the blue front cover/title page. Textual differences exist between this and the published text, beginning with a different table of contents and including changes in the Acknowledgments section of the book. We are aware of another state of this draft that was comb-bound, which was issued by Knopf/Canada. Fine. [#032787] $500
51.
(n.p.), (n.p.), 2000. An early, tapebound typescript of this novel that was published in July, 2001. No publisher indicated, suggesting this was an early agent's copy, or some other kind of copy prepared prior to the publisher issuing any version of it. Double-spaced, double-sided, 507 pages. "Revised: December 11, 2000" printed on the white front cover/title page. Textual differences exist between this and the published text, beginning with a different table of contents and including changes in the Acknowledgments section of the book. We are aware of another state of this draft that was comb-bound, which was issued by Knopf/Canada. Very near fine. [#030737] $450
52.
NY, Random House AudioBooks, 2001. The audiobook. The unabridged novel, on seven cassette tapes, read by Jason Culp. Fine in a fine carton, which has been signed by Irving. [#023858] $250
53.
NY, Simon & Schuster, (2012). The advance reading copy. Signed by the author on the title page. Scarce signed even in the trade edition: Irving did not do any signings on his author tour promoting the novel, explaining that he was no longer willing to sign books at readings per his doctor's warnings, as it would hinder his ability to write his manuscripts by hand, as he prefers to do. He did sign a handful of copies of the trade edition at his local bookstore; and he signed some number of bookplates as able. We have seen only one other signed advance copy. Fine in self-wrappers. [#032878] $350
54.
NY, Random House, (1977). A mystery novel in the Detective Sergeant Mulheisen series, by the Montana author. Inscribed by Jackson to Peter Matthiessen: "Something to read on the stage. Come out and fish some more." Matthiessen visited Montana numerous times on fishing trips with Jim Harrison and others; presumably the "stage" Jackson mentions is short for "stage coach," meaning the plane he would take from the east coast. Foxed; very good in a very good, internally foxed dust jacket, rubbed at the rear spine fold. [#032485] SOLD
55.
Reykjavik, Mal Og Menning, 1988. The signed limited edition of the Icelandic translation of On the Road. Copy No. 10 of 10 copies signed and numbered by the translator, Olafur Gunnarsson. Tearsheets of a 1988 Icelandic magazine article by Gunnarsson on the same subject laid in, also signed by its author. The book is fine, apparently issued without a dust jacket. The limitation is self-made, with the limitation declared on the title page, in Gunnarsson's hand. [#032879] SOLD
56.
NY, Grove Press, (1983). A review copy of this highly praised Kerouac biography, with review slip, subject photo, and promotional information laid in. Signed by Nicosia on the book, the review slip and the photo. Blurbs by William Burroughs (who calls it "the best of the many books published about Jack Kerouac's life and work"), John Clellon Holmes ("This is the Kerouac I knew...A great writer and a great biographer have come together..."), Seymour Krim, Jan Kerouac ("...the most accurate and comprehensive biography of my father I've come across..."), and Michael McClure. Library Journal wrote "To call this book the definitive Kerouac biography is an understatement... All-inclusive and richly detailed." Near fine in a near fine dust jacket. [#032880] SOLD
57.
Larkspur, Jan Kerouac Benefit Fund, 1995. An attractive poster, designed and printed by noted poster artist Alton Kelley -- who designed many of the famous psychedelic posters of the 1960s in San Francisco. This poster was prepared to promote a series of benefits for Kerouac's daughter Jan, who, besides being quite ill and without health care benefits, was contesting the disposition of Kerouac's literary estate. A series of fundraising events were organized in San Francisco, which included appearances and performances by a number of people who had been closely connected to Kerouac and the poets and artists of the Beat generation and later the Sixties counterculture. Of a total edition of 1135, this is one of 1000 unsigned copies. Approximately 18" x 26". Rolled, else fine. [#017485] $30
58.
Larkspur, Jan Kerouac Benefit Fund, 1995. An attractive poster, designed and printed by noted poster artist Alton Kelley -- who designed many of the famous psychedelic posters of the 1960s in San Francisco. This poster was prepared to promote a series of benefits for Kerouac's daughter Jan, who, besides being quite ill and without health care benefits, was contesting the disposition of Kerouac's literary estate. A series of fundraising events were organized in San Francisco, which included appearances and performances by a number of people who had been closely connected to Kerouac and the poets and artists of the Beat generation and later the Sixties counterculture. Of a total edition of 1135, this is one of 135 numbered copies signed by Alton Kelley and by Jan Kerouac. Fine. [#029252] $150
59.
(n.p.), Viking, (2002). The advance reading copy of the 40th anniversary edition of Kesey's landmark novel of the 1960s, here with a new introduction, and illustrations, by the author. Publication was slated for January, 2002; Kesey died in November, 2001, a fact not reflected in the cover text. Given the advance time associated with such prepublication productions, and their primary purpose -- to get copies of the book to reviewers with long lead times, in order that reviews can be ready by publication day -- the introduction in this advance copy is probably the last original piece of Kesey's writing to be published in his lifetime. Mild splaying to covers, else fine in wrappers. [#032881] $125
60.
Springfield, Springfield High School, 1950. High school yearbook, from Kesey's freshman year. Includes Kesey's freshman year photo and a picture of him in the Drama Club. Signed by Kesey in full, with an apparent self-caricature. Kesey's signature appears, upside down, on the verso of the rear flyleaf; there are more than 100 other additional signatures and inscriptions in the book. This is the earliest Ken Kesey signature we've ever seen, and the less-than-flattering self-caricature reveals both his sense of humor and, one might infer, his confidence. Rubbing to cloth covers; a very good copy. [#032882] SOLD
61.
Springfield, Springfield High School, 1952-53. The yearbooks for Kesey's junior and senior high school years. Kesey appears in approximately 20 spots in the two books. Various ownership signatures and classmate signatures and inscriptions. One tiny tear to the padded cover of each volume, with a small tape repair to 1953. The overall condition is very good. [#032931] $1,000
E-list: From the Library of Peter Matthiessen