Catalog 127, D

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54. DAHL, Roald. George's Marvelous Medicine. NY: Knopf (1982). The first American edition, trade issue. By the author of James and the Giant Peach, among others. Slight sunning to board edges; else fine in a near fine, price-clipped dust jacket.

55. DELILLO, Don. Americana. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1971. His first book. Signed by the author. Light fading to top stain and endpages; faint corner bump; still very near fine in a near fine, spine-faded dust jacket with minor restoration of a tiny tear at the lower edge of the rear panel. A very attractive copy of an important first book, seldom found in this condition and very scarce signed.

56. -. Another copy. Fading to top stain and endpages; faint, barely visible stamp to front flyleaf; near fine in a very good dust jacket rubbed along the rear spine fold and with a chip imminent at the crown.

57. DELILLO, Don. End Zone. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1972. His second novel and, because of the black dust jacket, probably the toughest DeLillo book to find in nice shape. This copy is fine in a very near fine dust jacket touched up slightly at the spine extremities and with fading to the blue and red of the black spine. Signed by the author, with the signature slightly smudged, most likely also by the author. A beautiful copy of this book, much nicer than usually encountered.

58. DELILLO, Don. Great Jones Street. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1973. Signed by the author. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with very slight fading and a touch of rubbing to the spine. One of the nicer copies of this title we've seen.

59. DELILLO, Don. Ratner's Star. NY: Knopf, 1976. His fourth novel, which uses the framework of a boy genius decoding a signal sent from a star to examine issues of information: DeLillo's personal favorite of his first six books. Signed by the author. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with one edge tear and a little dampstaining visible only on verso.

60. DELILLO, Don. Players. NY: Knopf, 1977. His fifth novel. Signed by the author. Fine in a very near fine dust jacket with just a touch of edge-toning on the rear panel.

61. DELILLO, Don. Running Dog. NY: Knopf, 1978. His sixth novel. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket with a corner crease on the rear flap.

62. DELILLO, Don. The Names. NY: Knopf, 1982. Classic DeLillo, a novel that throws into sharp relief the individual, the family, and language, amid the vagaries of international events. Signed by the author. Top stain faded; else fine in a very near fine dust jacket with a touch of creasing across the top edge of the rear panel.

63. -. Same title. The uncorrected proof copy. Cocked; spine-faded; corner creased, with a couple dozen marginal lines. Very good in wrappers, with publicity information stapled inside the front cover.

64. DELILLO, Don. White Noise. (NY): Viking (1985). Winner of the National Book Award, an award for which DeLillo has been nominated for twice since. Signed by the author. A strip of sunning to board edges; near fine in a dust jacket with one short edge tear and slight shelf wear at the spine heel.

65. DELILLO, Don. The Day Room. NY: Knopf, 1987. DeLillo's first produced play, in which the figure and ground of unreality and reality repeatedly reverse. Signed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket. Originally published in American Theater in 1986.

66. DELILLO, Don. Libra. (NY): Viking (1988). His highly praised novel of the events leading up to the Kennedy assassination, and the second of his first nine novels (published under his name) to be nominated for the National Book Award. Signed by the author. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with typical fading on and near the spine.

67. DELILLO, Don. Mao II. (NY): Viking (1991). Winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award. A novel about the interacting forces of crowds and terrorists, individuals and novelists. Signed by the author. Fine in a near fine dust jacket with some scratches to the front panel.

68. DELILLO, Don. Underworld. (NY): Scribner (1997). His masterwork. Winner of the William Dean Howells Award for the best work of fiction published in the U.S. over a five-year period. Nominated for the National Book Award. Signed by the author. Near fine in a fine dust jacket.

69. DELILLO, Don. The Body Artist. NY: Scribner (2001). A novella. One of an unspecified number of copies signed by the author on a tipped-in leaf. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

70. DELILLO, Don. Cosmopolis. NY: Scribner (2003). The advance reading copy of his most recent novel. Fine in wrappers.

71. DICK, Philip K. The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch. Garden City: Doubleday, 1965. One of Dick's most famous and most highly regarded novels, a drug novel written at the beginning of the psychedelic era, which deals with a 21st century society in which various mind-altering drugs are a part of the regular life and recreation of the populace, a percentage of whom are clairvoyant. For the next decade or more, Dick pursued the question of the nature of the insights provided by the drug experience -- to what extent they were illusions and to what extent the insights revealed to a drug-altered consciousness were, in fact, metaphysical truths. More than any other science fiction author, but followed by many, Dick used the genre to explore metaphysics, consciousness and the nature of reality. This title was one of the five Philip K. Dick novels selected for Pringle's "hundred best" list -- more titles than any other author. This is a near fine copy (front hinge tender) in a very good dust jacket with fading to the spine lettering, shallow chipping to the crown and an edge tear at the upper front flap fold. The original price, still present and legible on the jacket flap, has been partially covered by a publisher's $4.95 sticker. There is also a date (Dec 21 1964) stamped on the front flap. One of Dick's scarcest novels these days, and by consensus one of his most important and sought after.

72. DIDION, Joan. Run River. NY: Obolensky (1963). The first book, a novel, by this writer whose astringent fiction and essays comprise one of the defining voices of our time. A fine copy in a near fine, price-clipped dust jacket with one edge tear and rubbing to the corners and spine extremities.

73. DIDION, Joan. Play It As It Lays. NY: FSG (1970). Her third book, second novel, basis for the 1972 movie for which she and her husband, John Gregory Dunne, wrote the screenplay. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

74. -. Another copy. Faint top stain foxing; else fine in a fine dust jacket.

75. -. Same title, the screenplay. NY/Los Angeles: F.P. Films/The Play It Company, 1971 (1972). Mimeographed filmscript, dated November 1971, with pink and blue revision pages laid in from December 1971 and January 1972. 3-hole punched and claspbound in gold covers with printed title. Near fine, in custom slipcase. The second screenplay that Didion worked on with Dunne after the success of their collaboration on The Panic in Needle Park. They later collaborated on A Star is Born and on the film adaptation of Dunne's novel True Confessions. This is an original script, dating from the time when they were reproduced by mimeograph machine -- a self-limiting process in a way that photocopying, which is most widely used today, is not. Scarce.

76. DIDION, Joan. A Book of Common Prayer. NY: Simon & Schuster (1977). The third novel, fourth book, by the author of Slouching Toward Bethlehem and Play It As It Lays. A novel of the intrigue at the heart of a fictional Central American country, in some ways presaging her later essay, Salvador, one of the most devastating portraits of the collapse of moral order in the Americas. Inscribed by the author in the year of publication. Faint erasure to flyleaf, lower board edge bumped. Near fine in a near fine dust jacket.

77. DONLEAVY, J.P. The Ginger Man. Paris: Olympia (1955). The author's first book, issued as No. 7 in the Traveller's Companion series, a publishing choice by maverick publisher Maurice Girodias (who published Lolita and Naked Lunch, among others) which later cost him his entire company, when Donleavy finally won a 25-year long suit resulting from Girodias marketing his novel as part of a pornography series. Trace edge foxing; still fine in wrappers. In custom clamshell case.

78. DORRIS, Michael. A Yellow Raft in Blue Water. NY: Henry Holt (1987). His highly praised first novel. Dorris was a professor at Dartmouth College and responsible for starting the Native American Studies Program there and was of Irish, French and Modoc Indian descent himself. He was married to writer Louise Erdrich, also part-Native American, and the two co-wrote several books; they claimed in interviews to have collaborated on all their books, including her bestselling and award-winning novels as well as this book and Dorris' book of nonfiction, The Broken Cord, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award. This copy is inscribed by the author to the former President of Dartmouth College and his wife in 1988. Slight bump to several page corners; else fine in a fine dust jacket. A nice association copy of this well-received first novel.

79. -. Same title. Second printing. Inscribed by the author to the wife of the President of Dartmouth College "in the pleasure of good friendship and with affection." Fine in a fine dust jacket.

80. -. Same title, the first Danish edition, Gul Flåde På Blåt Vand. (Viborg): Holkenfeldts Forlag (1988). Inscribed by the author in 1992. Pages uncut, although the title page has been opened roughly; near fine in self-wrappers.

81. DORRIS, Michael. The Broken Cord. NY: Harper & Row, 1989. Dorris' account of adopting and raising an Indian boy whom he later discovered suffered from Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, a debilitating illness about which virtually nothing was known at the time of the adoption. Thus the book is both a personal memoir and a small but important piece of social history, tracking the medical profession's developing knowledge of this disease over the years. This book later became the basis for a television miniseries, dramatizing the story. Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Heartland Prize and the Christopher Award. Inscribed by the author to the former President of Dartmouth College and his wife. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

82. -. Same title. Second printing. Inscribed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

83. DORRIS, Michael and ERDRICH, Louise. The Crown of Columbus. (NY): HarperCollins (1991). A collaborative novel written by the husband and wife team for the quincentenary of Columbus' expedition to America, and incorporating a Native American perspective: both authors claimed ancestry that was in part Native American. Inscribed by Erdrich and Dorris to the former President of Dartmouth College in the month of publication: "In the pleasure of long/ friendship and shared memory." Fine in a fine dust jacket. A nice association, in that Erdrich met Dorris when she attended his Native American Studies program at Dartmouth, and later both of them worked at the college for a time.

84. DORRIS, Michael. Morning Girl. (NY): Hyperion (1992). A children's book set on a Bahamian island in 1492. Warmly inscribed by the author in the year of publication to the former President of Dartmouth College. Fine in a fine dust jacket. "Compliments of the author" card laid in.

85. DOVE, Rita. Fifth Sunday. Lexington: University of Kentucky, 1985. Volume One in the Callaloo Fiction Series, and the first collection of fiction by this African-American writer who became, in 1987, one of the youngest winners of the Pulitzer Prize for poetry and, in 1993, the Poet Laureate of the United States. Inscribed by the author in 1995 on the occasion of the author's receiving an honorary doctorate from Dartmouth College. Fine in wrappers, as issued; there was no hardcover edition of this title.

86. DOVE, Rita. Grace Notes. NY: Norton (1989). Poetry, her first collection published after she won the Pulitzer Prize for Thomas and Beulah in 1987. Inscribed by the author in 1995. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

87. DOVE, Rita. Through the Ivory Gate. NY: Pantheon (1992). The Pulitzer Prize-winning poet's first novel. Inscribed by the author in 1995. Fine in a fine dust jacket. A beautiful copy of this important African-American writer's first and only (to date) novel.

88. DOVE, Rita. Selected Poems. NY: Pantheon (1993). Includes the Poet Laureate's Pulitzer Prize-winning "Thomas and Beulah." Inscribed by the author in 1995. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

89. DOVE, Rita. The Darker Face of the Earth. (Brownsville): Story Line Press (1994). A limited edition of this verse play. Of a total edition of 250 hardbound copies, this is one of 224 numbered copies signed by the author. Attractively bound in two-tone cloth; fine without dust jacket, as issued.

90. DOVE, Rita. Mother Love. NY: Norton (1995). A collection of poems published during her tenure as Poet Laureate. Inscribed by the author in the month after publication. Fine in a fine dust jacket, with a photograph of Dove with the recipient laid in.

91. DOVE, Rita. The Poet's World. Washington: Library of Congress, 1995. Two lectures delivered as Poet Laureate of the United States, with a 30-plus page autobiography. Inscribed by the author in the year of publication. Light corner bump; else fine in wrappers.

92. DRABBLE, Margaret. The Radiant Way. NY: Knopf, 1987. The first American edition. Inscribed by the author. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

93. DUFFY, Bruce. The World As I Found It. NY: Ticknor & Fields, 1987. His highly praised first novel, about Wittgenstein, Bertrand Russell and G.E. Moore. Warmly and lengthily inscribed by the author in 1988. Fine in a near fine dust jacket.

94. DUFFY, Bruce. Last Comes the Egg. (NY): Simon & Schuster (1997). His second novel. Inscribed by the author in December, 1966, the month prior to publication. Fine in a fine dust jacket.

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